University of the West of Scotland

Postgraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2021/22

Last modified: 21/04/2021 16:22:59

Named Award Title:PG Cert Coaching and Mentoring

Award Title for Each Award: PG Cert  Coaching and Mentoring

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:Not applicable
Maximum Period of Registration:3 years
Mode of Study:Part Time
Campus:Distance/Online Learning

School:School of Education & Social Sciences
Programme Leader:L. Lafferty

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

Appropriate Undergraduate Qualification
Participants will typically have a teaching qualification or other relevant professional qualification e.g. training, development, HR, and/or on-going practical experience of/responsibility for training and development and/or supporting peers and colleagues as part of their own organisational development policies.
Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applications from interested professionals without a teaching or other relevant professional qualification will be considered on the basis of a first degree in a relevant area e.g. training, development, HR and/or on-going practical experience of/responsibility for training and development and/or supporting peers and colleagues as specified above.

a) There shall be a reasonable expectation that any person admitted to a programme of study will be able to fulfil the educational aims and learning outcomes of the programme and achieve the standard required for the award - Regulation Chapter 2 (2.2)

b) In considering each application for admission to a programme of study, evidence shall be sought of personal, professional and educational qualifications and/or experiences that provide indications of ability to meet the demands of the programme. That is to say, the individual’s workplace context and work-related activities must be consistent with the practical aspects associated with the programme as there is a need for programme participants to establish clear links between professional practice and academic work undertaken as part of the programme of study - Regulation Chapter 2 (2.3)

c) Applicants whose first language is not English must provide formal, official proof that they meet the English language requirements specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework. Additionally, evidence of English proficiency must be no more than three years old counting back from the anticipated start date of the programme. If the applicant has been working or studying in an English speaking country for a substantial period of time, this can be taken into consideration as long as a statement to this effect is included in his/her references. If the applicant has studied at degree level in an English speaking country for a period of one year or more, this can also be taken into consideration as long as the programme was taught and assessed entirely in English and was undertaken in the last three years counting back from the anticipated start date of the programme. Relevant transcripts must be provided as evidence of this and a relevant statement must be included in the references - Chapter 2 (2.12)

d) Applicants will be required to supply a minimum of one 'work-related' reference in support of their application to join the programme. Therefore, applicants will need to ensure, in good time, that their referee is willing and able to write a reference (letter of recommendation) on their behalf.

Referees should be in a position to provide an informed view of the applicant’s academic ability and suitability for their chosen programme of study and any other information they consider as being relevant to the individual’s application.

The referee should also hold a position of authority within the applicant’s employer organisation so as to enable them to confirm that the applicant’s workplace context is consistent with the practical aspects of the programme i.e. they can confirm the applicant is able (or is about) to engage in a coaching/mentoring role and that the applicant has the support and permission to reflect on/refer to their work related activity throughout the programme (n.b. programme requirements associated with work related activity will be subject to compliance with UWS Ethical Guidelines so as to ensure confidentiality, privacy and anonymity of all participants involved in such activity).

In this respect applicants are advised to supply their prospective referees with an overview of the programme so that they can comment on the individual’s ability to meet with the general demands of, and the specific practical aspects associated with, the programme. Please contact the Programme Leader for further, specific details.


Recognition of Prior Learning: UWS processes associated with recognition of prior learning (RPL) will be adopted in line with Chapter 2 (2.13) of the UWS Regulatory Framework. Accreditation of Prior Learning/ Experiential Learning will be judged on individual claims made by the individual in conjunction with academic staff with subject specialist knowledge relevant to the programme. Advice and guidance on the RPL process can be located online from UWS' webpages (Policies and Procedures).


Further desirable skills pre-application


General Overview

In general terms, recognition of the benefits of mentoring, coaching, (‘life’ coaching), and developing ‘communities of professional practice’ has evolved gradually over time across (local, national and international) industry sectors. For example, knowledge exchange within and between organisations (Eby, 1997); job and/or career related skills development (Kochan and Pascarelli, 2003); promoting collaborative (working) relationships (Mullen and Lick,1999; Whelan, 2005), and as a means of supporting institutional reform and improvement (Hargreaves, 2003; Elmore, 2007). More recent interventions reflect emergent themes. For example, coaching under-represented groups (Ortiz-Walters and Gilson, 2012), PhD coaching (Godskesen and Kobayashi, 2016), ‘reverse mentoring’ (Raza and Onyesoh, 2020), coaching while walking (Turner, 2017; Cook and van Nieuwerburgh, 2020), and health and wellbeing coaching (Ahmann et al,  2020). In particular, across the 3-18 education sector the coaching/mentoring continuum aligns positively with the type of situated professional (learning and) support model espoused by the Scottish Government (2010, 2011), the General Teaching Council for Scotland (2011, 2014) and the National Partnership Group (2011) as a means of driving forward Scotland’s ambitious ‘21st Century’ education agenda.

Therefore, the programme aims to support participants from across a diverse range of industry/sectoral backgrounds. Both from the perspective of enabling them to identify and implement appropriate coaching/mentoring strategies to support peers and colleagues during often individually challenging periods of reform and uncertainty, as well as during the implementation of (and, where applicable, on-going compliance with) professional accreditation and/or organisational policies/procedures.

 

References

Ahmann, E., Leikin, S., Smith, K., Ellington, L. and Pille, R. (2020) 'Exploring Health Literacy and its Relationship to Health and Wellness Coaching'. International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentoring, 18 (2), pp.83-100. doi: 10.24384/9qz4-w404

Cook, S. and van Nieuwerburgh, C. (2020) ‘The experience of coaching whilst walking: A pilot study’, Coaching Psychologist, 16(2), pp.46–57. Available at: EBSCOhost

Eby, L. (1997) ‘Alternative forms of mentoring in changing organisational environments: A conceptual extension of the mentoring literature’. Journal of Vocational Behavior [sic], 51(1), pp.125-144. Available at: ScienceDirect

Elmore, R. (2007) ‘Professional Networks and School Improvement’. The School
Administrator, 64 (4), pp.20-24. Available at: https://www.aasa.org/SchoolAdministratorArticle.aspx?id=6812 (Accessed: 6 April 2021)

General Teaching Council for Scotland (2011) Professional Update: a positive step forward for the teaching profession in Scotland (An initial statement from GTC Scotland). Edinburgh: GTCS

General Teaching Council for Scotland (2014) Professional Update. Edinburgh: GTCS

Godskesen, M. and Kobayashi, S. (2016) 'Coaching doctoral students – a means to enhance progress and support self-organisation in doctoral education'. Studies in Continuing Education, 38(2), pp.145-161. doi: 10.1080/0158037X.2015.1055464

Hargreaves, D. (2003) Working Laterally: How innovation networks make an educational epidemic. London: DEMOS

Kochan, F.K., Pascarelli, J.T. (2003) Global perspectives on mentoring: transforming contexts, communities, and cultures. North Carolina (US): Information Age Publishing

Mullen, C. A., Lick, D. W. (1999) New Directions in Mentoring: Creating a culture of synergy. London: Falmer Press

National Partnership Group for Teaching Scotland’s Future (2011) Summary work plan submitted to the Cabinet Secretary for Education and Lifelong Learning. Edinburgh: The Scottish Government

Ortiz-Walters, R. and Gilson, L.L. (2012). Mentoring Programs for Under-Represented Groups, in Passmore, J., Peterson, D.B., and Freire, T. (eds.) The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of the Psychology of Coaching and Mentoring. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons, pp.266-282.

Raza, A., and Onyesoh, K. (2020). 'Reverse mentoring for senior NHS leaders: a new type of relationship'. Future Healthcare Journal, 7(1), pp.94–96. doi:10.7861/fhj.2019-0028

The Scottish Government (2010) Teaching Scotland's Future - Report of a review of teacher education in Scotland. (Chair: Graham Donaldson) Edinburgh: The Scottish Government

The Scottish Government (2011) Advancing Professionalism in Teaching - The Report of the Review of Teacher Employment in Scotland (Chair: Professor Gerry McCormac) Edinburgh: The Scottish Government

Turner, A. (2017) ‘Coaching through walking’. Coaching Psychologist, 13(2), pp.80–85. Available at: EBSCOhost

Whelan, E. (2005) Knowledge Exchange in Electronic Networks of Practice; Towards a Conceptual framework. Galway: National University of Ireland

 

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

The Pg. Certificate Coaching and Mentoring is delivered entirely online through UWS’ virtual learning environment (VLE). Within the VLE, participants remotely access set and extension readings and other course materials, and engage with on-line, asynchronous communication with tutors and their co-learners through use of e-mail and discussion boards. A range of 'authentic' formative and summative assessment methods are used across the programme. Assessment details are published online at the outset of each module via a specific ‘assessment handbook’ together with links to UWS assessment regulations and resources related to academic writing and referencing. Programme and Module Handbooks also include general assessment information and contain clear references to the UWS Regulatory Framework and other relevant policies. All assessments relate to SCQF Level 11.

In broad terms, all learning, teaching and assessment approaches have been informed and developed in ways which are consistent with the aspirations set out within UWS Strategy 2025, the Guidelines for Effective Practice in Assessment (revised annually), and cognisance of ‘good practice’ advice compiled by UWS' Education Futures (formerly Learning Innovation). More specifically, online module development has been informed by guidance published in the UK Quality Code for Higher Education (revised in 2018) and its associated themes, and other relevant documents including the Master’s Degree Characteristics Statement (2020). The programme has also benefited from drawing on the programme team’s combined experience of the design and delivery of Masters level e-learning modules and associated interventions which can be traced back to 2001. Attendance requirements associated with the Pg. Certificate Coaching and Mentoring programme are informed by the UWS Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure (n.d). Attendance requirements are explained in Programme and Module Handbooks and participants are encouraged to seek advice from the module tutor and/or Programme Leader in the event that they experience any difficulties in meeting with the recommended/set deadlines associated with module coursework.

 

Connectivity

With all of the foregoing factors in mind, there is an expectation that participants will have access to a reliable internet connection. Additionally, there is an expectation that participants will have access to an appropriate internet connected device which will enable full engagement with, and the development of, work at Masters level; participants will need to use word processing and, on occasion, other common file formatting software packages to enable engagement with aspects of the programme.

 

Reading

Consideration of current and recent literature is required throughout the programme as a means of linking theoretical perspectives to professional practice. As a result, set (and optional) reading is an integral part of coursework and participants are also expected to source additional literature which is of direct relevance to their professional context. Fully enrolled participants have access to a range of resources and services offered by UWS’ Library. Although every effort is made to supply module specific texts books in electronic (‘e’) format, it is not always possible to offer every text in electronic format and/or some participants may prefer to purchase their own copies of text books. Participants are advised to liaise with the Programme Leader when/if considering the purchase of texts so as to receive advice and/or an up-to-date module reading list (as reading lists outlined via individual module descriptors are sometimes updated during an academic session where possible and applicable).

 

Further study

Individuals who successfully complete and pass all three modules will be eligible for the award of Pg. Certificate Coaching and Mentoring. In the event an individual wishes to build on this initial award by continuing with a further programme of study towards a Pg. Diploma/M.Ed, then they may engage with the processes as set out via Chapter 2 of the UWS Regulatory Framework (Admissions and Recognition of Prior Learning); completion of further modules could provide the individual with an opportunity to seek professional recognition/update (3-18 education sector only).


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

In general terms all aspects of delivery, coursework and assessment provide participants on the Pg. Certificate Coaching and Mentoring with opportunities to develop academically, personally and professionally in line with the aspirations set out via UWS’ graduate attributes (UWS Quality Handbook) and outlined online via the Graduate Attributes web resource.

More specifically, participants will develop and enhance their employability skills in the areas of Knowledge and Understanding; Applied Knowledge and Understanding; Generic Cognitive Skills; Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills; Autonomy, Accountability and Working with others, as encompassed by SCQF Level 11. They will develop and enhance these skills in ways specific to and of direct relevance to their own professional context and to the demands and issues inherent within current and anticipated developments in the area of coaching and mentoring.

Personal Development Planning
In line with UWS guidance and protocols for Personal Development Planning (PDP), elements of personal and critical reflection are embedded via coursework and assessment across the programme but the overall approach to PDP is also informed by the following important consideration(s).

  • Those participants from within the education sector embarking on the programme already have to maintain a CPD portfolio and undertake Annual Career Reviews as part of their contractual duties.
  • Other professionals embarking on the programme are likely to be subject to similar requirements.

Therefore we aim to balance the wishes of the University in this area with the need to avoid overload and possible intrusion upon the participants’ professional obligations.
 

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

This programme relates to a participant’s existing professional context and fits within the University’s definition of Work Related Learning (WRL).

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

For the purposes of this programme, this equates to the following:

In addition to the general expectations outlined above, specific engagement and attendance requirements are set out via individual module handbooks. Each handbook also includes a detailed module timeline so as to enable learners to manage their study time accordingly; to plan and review their progress against timescales and deadlines at regular intervals. In this respect, attention is drawn to the ‘student learning hours’ assigned to study at this level (as indicated via individual module descriptors) and any learner who faces challenges in keeping pace with individual module requirements should notify the relevant module tutor. Seeking support and advice from the programme leader is also encouraged. Online engagement and attendance is monitored regularly and it is vital that any learner who is unable to access the virtual learning environment and/or engage with coursework requirements for over one (working) week should notify the appropriate member of staff, immediately.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. PG Cert
Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate critical understanding of key theories, concepts and principles
that cover and integrate most, if not all, of the main areas of a subject or discipline – including their features, boundaries, terminology and conventions in a coaching or mentoring context.
A2Demonstrate a critical understanding of the principal theories, principles and concepts as they apply to the student’s specific professional context.
A3Demonstrate critical awareness of current issues associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use a significant range of the principal skills, techniques, practices and/or materials which are associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
B2Apply a range of standard and specialised research or equivalent instruments and techniques of enquiry to investigate issues, processes and practices associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
B3Demonstrate originality or creativity in the application of knowledge and understanding to issues, processes and practices associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Apply critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis to issues which are at the forefront or informed by developments at the forefront of situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
C2Develop original and creative responses to problems and issues associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
C3Critically review, consolidate and extend knowledge, skills/practices and thinking associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Using appropriate methods, communicate about issues, processes and practices associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
D2Communicate with peers, more senior colleagues and specialists about issues, processes and practices associated with situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
D3Use a wide range of software to support and enhance work at this level that is of relevance to situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
D4Undertake critical evaluations of a wide range of numerical and graphical data in order to inform approaches to and developments in the practice of situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise substantial autonomy and initiative in professional and equivalent activities relating to situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
E2Take responsibility for own work and work as a leading member of a team, in a range of contexts to develop and enhance practice relating to situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
E3Take responsibility for a significant range of resources relating to situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
E4Practise in ways which draw on critical reflection on own and others’ roles and responsibilities relating to situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular.
E5Deal with complex ethical and professional issues relating to situated professional learning in general and coaching and mentoring in particular, and make informed judgements on issues not addressed by current professional and/or ethical codes or practices.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
11EDUC11085Contextualising Coaching and Mentoring20check mark  
11EDUC11086Critical self-evaluation and development20check mark  
11EDUC11087Situated Professional Learning20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
The Pg. Certificate Coaching and Mentoring will comprise of the three named modules above which, in the context of this specific award, would require to be completed in a linear manner. As the modules listed above are all assigned to a specific term and cannot be taken outside of the relevant term, this means that a participant will complete the Pg. Certificate in approximately 18 months. The final module - EDUC11085 Contextualising Coaching and Mentoring - is offered in a long, thin format (commencing at the start of Term 1 with the summative assessment submission made in Term 2) so as to provide participants with a more flexible and immersive learning experience. In real terms this extended delivery mode neither impacts negatively on the overall duration of the programme nor the award of the Pg. Certificate. Market feedback associated with other Masters programmes has indicated a dearth of interest in taking modules in Term 3. This is because the vast majority of individuals who undertake part-time programmes often work in organisations which may close for several weeks during the summer months. Participants would then find it very difficult to fit study around their holiday plans. In addition, coursework requires participants to reflect on their practice and to use consultation with colleagues and other professionals with relevant expertise as a basis for their responses to coursework tasks. As it would not be possible to do this while their workplace may be closed for summer holidays or typical annual leave periods, it has been decided not to offer any modules during Term 3; this situation is monitored and evaluated annually.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Individuals who successfully complete and pass all three modules (equating to 60 Credits at SCQF Level 11) will be eligible for the award of Pg. Certificate Coaching and Mentoring.


B. PG Dip
Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award


C. Masters
Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Award


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.



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