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Undergraduate Programme Specifications

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Session: 2020/21

Last modified: 17/03/2020 16:34:55

Named Award Title:BSc Midwifery Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc  Midwifery
Dip HE  Health Studies
Cert HE  Health Studies

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:NMC
Maximum Period of Registration:Five years
Mode of Study:Full Time
Campus:Lanarkshire

School:School of Health and Life Sciences
Programme Leader:Jean Watson

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Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

4 Higher Grades @ BBBC or equivalent including English. Science subject is also preferred.
Maths /Life skills Maths/Application of Maths at least at standard grade 2 or above, Intermediate 2 at C or above or National 5.


or GCE

CCC (Preference given to science based subject) plus GCSEs in Maths, English Language and English Literature


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Any HNC will be considered although Health or Science related preferred.
PLUS
Higher English. (If Applicant has passed Communication and Literature 1 at level 6 modules in HNC will accept an alternative Higher.)

Maths /Life skills Maths/Application of Maths at least at standard grade 2 or above, Intermediate 2 at C or above or National 5.

If Applicant has completed module HF2434 or FN2734 Essential Skills for Care Practice in HNC, this satisfies Maths requirement.

HND Same as HNC but does not require Higher English


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

All applicants must satisfy the NMC entry requirements as per NMC Standards for pre-registration midwifery education. This is to ensure applicants have good health and good character sufficient for safe and effective practice as a midwife (NMC Standard 4.3, 2009).

Entry is also dependent on the outcome of the following screening process:

- Group interview
- Health Screening
- Protection of Vulnerable Groups

International students are referred to UWS Overseas Marketing Team/International office who are responsible for mapping qualifications to ensure appropriateness and comparability. Overseas Students must demonstrate ability to speak, understand and write English. For Health, Nursing and Midwifery courses that lead to professional registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council, applicants are required to have an IELTS score as follows: OVERALL SCORE OF 7.0. At least 6.5 in the writing section and at least 7 in the reading, listening and speaking sections. No other English language test can be used as an alternative to IELTS for Pre-Registration programmes as the NMC only recognise two English Language tests IELTS and OET.

For more information please visit the UWS website at: http://www.uws.ac.uk/international-students/entry-and-english-language-requirements/.
In accordance with NMC Circular (03/2008 and NMC Standard 4.2, 2009) the School will continue to test numeracy and literacy if required to ensure that applicants have provided evidence of literary and numeracy sufficient to undertake education and practice at the appropriate level.

Other Required Qualifications/Experience
Applicants may also be considered with other academic, vocational or professional qualifications deemed to be equivalent.


Further desirable skills pre-application

Communication/Interpersonal Skills
Ability to work as part of a Team
ICT Literate
Driving Licence
Previous work experience in a caring/health environment

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General Overview

Our belief is that the education of student midwives is the responsibility of midwifery educationalists and clinicians working in a partnership of close collaboration to ensure ‘fitness to practise’ at point of registration (NMC, 2009). The programme philosophy reflects the informed vision of the midwives’ role, responsibilities and core values contained within the Midwifery 2020 document (Midwifery 2020, 2010).

As a manifesto for midwifery education in the 21st century, the programme aims to prepare graduate practitioners who can develop and lead evidence-based care within the current environment of political policy, public health, cultural diversity and address the continuing challenge of reducing inequality and improving maternal and family health. In addition, patient safety education is embedded within the curriculum to prepare the future workforce to meet the needs of the complex health-care environment in terms of reducing harm and improving quality of care (WHO, 2011).

To meet the needs of women and their families within our society, the programme reflects a dynamic student centred approach to education with emphasis on active learning focussing on leadership, research-awareness, professional reflection, critical thinking and expert knowledge and understanding in preparation for autonomous practice within the maternity services. In addition, the programme seeks to facilitate skills necessary for employability, life -long learning and the acquisition of graduate attributes for ongoing personal and professional development.

Through a contemporary and innovative curriculum, the programme aims to transform the student to meet the diverse needs of the population of 2020, preparing them to deliver clinically safe, effective, person-centred and compassionate care.

PROGRAMME AIMS AND OUTCOMES

The graduate programme aims to ensure achievement of:

    Stipulated academic level for the award of BSc Midwifery.

    Requirements relating to professional competence and fitness for practice for registration as a midwife on Part 2 of the Professional Register (NMC).

    Requirements of the European Midwives Directive 80/155/EEC and Article 4 and 89/549/EEC Article 27

    Requirements of the European Union Midwives Directive (2005/36/EC "on the recognition of professional qualifications" as amended by Directive 2013/55/EU)

 

Develop graduate attributes:

    To prepare students who are fit for practice, award and employment.

    To develop an autonomous practitioner committed to personal development and lifelong learning.

    To develop graduate level decision making skills and the ability to use enquiry, evidence and research mindedness to influence midwifery practice.

    To profile midwifery practice within a multi-professional/multi-agency framework and positively influence a collaborative approach to learning and the delivery of healthcare.

    To equip the student with enhanced employability skills and the ability to plan a career pathway in the context of a dynamic and evolving healthcare system.

    To develop safe proficient and adaptable midwives who can facilitate health promotion approaches including the nurturing of self-care at individual, family and community level.

    To develop specific skills, knowledge and understanding of caring for women and babies with complex needs including holistic practice, team working and medicine management.

    To foster a commitment to contemporary practice in healthcare and to enable students to critically examine the underpinning models, philosophies and theoretical frameworks in midwifery

 

Programme Outcomes

1. To prepare a clinically competent, safe, effective and compassionate practitioner who applies evidence-based care within a systematic approach to midwifery care (NMC Standard 13, 2009).

2. To develop in the student an understanding of the holistic and social model of woman-centred care within a variety of maternity service settings and multidisciplinary and multi-agency teams (NMC Standard 13, 2009).

3. To develop a sound and expert knowledge base that underpins the care for all women, embracing normality and including those with complex, medical, obstetric and social needs (NMC Standard 13, 2009).

4. To facilitate the acquisition of excellent communication skills necessary for the development of leadership, advocacy and decision-making skills (NMC Standard 17, 2009; Essential Skills Clusters 1, Communication).

5. To provide a stimulating teaching and learning environment that fosters self-directed learning behaviour, research-awareness, graduate attributes and self-reflection (NMC Standard 17, 2009).

 

OUTLINE OF THE PROGRAMME

This is a three year programme comprising approximately 49% theory and 51% practice (NMC Standard 12, 2009). Theory is taught within the University of the West of Scotland, Lanarkshire Campus and practice placements are within acute obstetric-led maternity hospitals and community midwifery units within the associated NHS Boards that are Ayrshire and Arran, Lanarkshire, Dumfries and Galloway, Greater Glasgow and Clyde and Highland (NMC Standard 13, 2009). In addition, students are expected to undertake at least one placement out-with the acute maternity sector.  This alternative practice placement offers the student a different learning opportunity focussing on normality to enhance their knowledge, clinical skills and integration of theory with practice within a midwifery-led, low risk, flexible service. Short practice placements are also available in relation to Home Birth and Special Needs in Pregnancy (NMC Standard 13, 2009).

Curriculum content is informed by NMC Standards for pre-registration midwifery education (Standard, 17, 2009), Essential Skills Clusters (NMC, 2009) and Scottish Subject Benchmark Statement, Midwifery (QAA, 2009).

 

Programme Provision

The programme is provided on a full-time basis of no less than three year’s duration (equivalent to 156 weeks full time) with each year consisting of 45 programmed weeks. The programme must be complete within five years (including interruptions) (NMC Standard 10, 2009). Students are expected to experience 24-hour/seven-day care, enabling them to develop an understanding of the needs and experiences of women and babies throughout a 24-hour period (NMC Standard 13, 2009).

The programme consists of 360 credits of which 120 are at level 9 to achieve degree award (NMC Standard 9, 2009).

 

Qualification

Students will exit the programme with a dual qualification

1. BSc Midwifery – Academic Qualification (NMC Standard 9, 2009)

2. Registered Midwife – Professional Qualification

 

Supernumerary Status

In line with NMC Standard 14 (2009), students undertaking the programme are afforded supernumerary status during all practice placements. Student midwives cannot be employed to provide midwifery care during their training.

 

Career Pathways

Following graduation, there is a variety of career pathways available including:

    General Midwifery Practice – Obstetric Hospital (UK)

    Community Midwifery Practice – Midwifery-Led Units (Normality) (UK)

    Independent Midwifery Practice

    Midwifery within the Armed Forces

    Midwifery abroad particularly New Zealand and Australia

    Voluntary Service Overseas

    Public Health Nurse

    Employment within Public Health and Sexual Health Areas

    Research

    Education and Training of student midwives

 

Overview of Year One of the Programme

Initially the student will be integrated within the University environment and be provided with a foundation of relevant knowledge and skills. This will enable them to develop in an academic, professional and personal context. Study skills sessions will be provided which will focus on the nature of academic learning within the university setting including critical writing and reading, accessing the literature and study techniques. There will be an Induction week prior to the course commencing to provide Information, advice and guidance to the students in relation to facilities, timetable, book acquisition, virtual learning environment, library and literature searching. In addition, an on-line induction programme is offered to begin the development of ICT skills.

The student will receive education in relation to life and social sciences, adaptation to pregnancy, health and public health issues and basic caring practical midwifery skills. Key health issues including smoking, alcohol, nutrition, drug addiction, domestic abuse and poverty will be explored in relation to their effect on childbirth. The student will then be introduced to midwifery practice within the context of normal midwifery care during the preconceptual, prenatal, intranatal and postnatal periods including care and examination of the newborn.

The acquisition of clinical skills will be introduced using simulated practice techniques within the UWS skills laboratories using a range of specialist equipment and simulators, thus ensuring a safe environment for the student to learn through repeated practise under direct supervision. In addition, there will be online teaching and learning packages used, that specialises in the acquisition of clinical skills will be utilised allowing students to assess, plan, deliver and evaluate virtual care scenarios.

An introduction to Patient Safety Education is commenced in year 1 using the WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide (2011).

Sociology and Psychology input complements the midwifery curriculum through adding breadth to health topics including definitions of social inequality, social stratification, psychology of addiction and relationship between health and social/psychological wellbeing.

Research awareness is embedded through the programme and the focus in year one is aimed at introducing the student to the nature and purpose of evidence-based practice.

The graduate professional role and responsibilities of the midwife will be explored in relation the NMC Code (NMC, 2018)  with an emphasis on quality improvement/harm reduction through the delivery of safe, effective and compassionate care (WHO, 2011).

 

Practice Learning

All practice placements and practice learning is supported by Part 2: Standards for Student Supervision and Assessment (NMC, 2018). Students will be have the opportunity to achieve proficiencies out lined in the Standards of Proficiency for Midwives (NMC, 2019). The key aspect of practice placements is to give the student the opportunity to integrate the learned theory and simulated clinical skills into safe, effective practice. Whilst on placement, students are allocated a ‘Practice supervisor’, who will predominately be a midwife but they can also be other allied health professionals (Midwife, Nurse, Social worker, Radiographer). The Practice supervisor is responsible for the students teaching and learning in practice (NMC, 2018). Students will also be allocated a ‘Practice assessor’ who is a registered midwife and responsible for their practice assessment (NMC, 2018). In addition, students will be supported by ‘Academic assessors’ (midwifery academics) who are responsible for student progression. Through this tripartite arrangement of ‘Practice supervisor’, ‘Practice assessor’ and ‘Academic assessor’ along with the student there will be review, reflection of learning and progress and assessment (NMC, 2018).

 

Practice Placements

There are three practice placements in year one where the students will be exposed to normal, low risk midwifery practice. The key aspect of practice placements is to give the student the opportunity to integrate the learned theory and simulated clinical skills into safe, effective practise. This practice-based module comprises direct hands-on care that is formally assessed and graded and is counted as part of the academic award (NMC Standard 15, 2009).

 

Practice Placements include:

1. Community

2. Labour Ward

3. Prenatal/Postnatal

 

Total number of practice weeks = 21 weeks (including one week skills week)

 

By the end of year one, the student will be able to provide evidence-based holistic care to healthy women and their babies during pregnancy, labour and the postnatal period and demonstrate awareness of professional, ethical and legal issues relevant to midwifery practice. In terms of professional development, the student is being prepared to take on the role of lead professional for all healthy women with straightforward pregnancies (Midwifery 2020,). In addition, the student will have begun the life-long learning journey through personal and professional portfolio development and self-reflection.

 

Overview of Year Two of the Programme

The focus of year two prepares the student to assess, manage, support and care for women whose childbirth experience has been compromised due to complex medical, obstetric and/or social needs during pregnancy, labour and /or the postnatal period. This encompasses the underlying pathophysiology and the role of the midwife in addressing the physical, psycho-social and education needs and implications for pregnancy and birth outcome.

Included are the management of obstetric emergency situations where there is an adapted teaching and learning approach using the Scottish Multiprofessional Maternity Development Programme format (SMMDP) using simulated clinical practice within the skills laboratories in relation to the identification and management of obstetric emergencies. This is done using specialist equipment and manikins permitting students to observe and then participate in ‘real-time’ emergency scenarios thus developing team working skills as well as clear integration of theory with practice within a safe learning environment. In addition, VLEs will be used to provide examples of ‘womens’ stories’ in relation to compromised pregnancy and labour that permit individual and group reflective activities and peer discussion on risk assessment and harm reduction.

Students will undertake a module titled, ‘Holistic Care of the Newborn’ that will provide them with detailed knowledge and skills related to factors that contribute to the health and well-being of the neonate. The student is also prepared to care for the compromised neonate. Also within this module, the student will be provided with the principles of ‘Examination of the Newborn’ in preparation for completion of this skill once qualified. Neonatal resuscitation is taught using SMMDP Teaching and Learning format.

There is a focus on women’s emotional and mental health issues including generic mental health problems, perinatal mental health problems, eating disorders, suicide, self-harm and reaction to bereavement.

Psychological input continues with a more in depth examination of the ethics of screening in relation to diagnosis and management of compromised pregnancy and the psychological effects of loss and bereavement.

There is continued development of professional ethical and legal issues relating to compromised midwifery practice, controversial outcomes and quality improvement through harm reduction strategies within the high risk maternity environment.

Patient Safety Education continues through exploration of issues in relation to multi-disciplinary team working and risk assessment and management.

In Trimester 3, the concept of ‘caseload holding’ is introduced whereby the student will care for a small number of women, following their journey through the maternity services and childbirth experience. Providing this type of learning and experience aims to enable the student to better understand the impact of pregnancy, birth and the integration of a new baby into family life as well as learning about the practicalities of planning, implementing and evaluating midwifery care in a way that is relevant to women. Case-load holding encompasses the total concept of person-centred care a key aspect of quality improvement (NMC Standard 13, 2009).

 

Practice Placements

There are four practice placements in year two that reflect the high risk theoretical content to permit direct integration of theory with practice. This practice-based module comprises direct hands-on care that is formally assessed and graded and is counted as part of the academic award (NMC Standard 15, 2009).

Total number of practice weeks = 21weeks.

 

Practice Placements include:

1. Labour Ward: 8 weeks – with an emphasis on high risk labour and including theatre and Triage.

2. Neonatal Unit: 4 weeks.

3. Women’s Health: 4 weeks – includes Daycare, Early Pregnancy and Gynaecology.

4. Community/ antenatal/postnatal ward: 5 weeks – focus on pre/postnatal care

By the end of year two, the student will be equipped to identify, assess and care for women, their babies and their families when childbirth is compromised and where there are complications necessitating medical/surgical intervention. In addition, the student will be able to provide critical care during obstetric emergencies. In terms of professional development, the student is being prepared to take on the role of key coordinator of care for women within the multidisciplinary team for women with complex pregnancies (Midwifery, 2020, 2010)

 

Overview of Year Three of the Programme

The overall aim of year three is to consolidate theory and practice learned in the preceding two years and further enhance that knowledge and understanding within a leadership framework. In year three, the student is encouraged to view the delivery of midwifery care within a patient safety agenda through developing skills in autonomous decision-making, management/leadership strategies and critical thinking. As part of the assessment process, the student will undertake a Quality Improvement Independent Project, critically exploring in detail a subject of their choice within the patient safety agenda.

Students will critically explore concepts of evidence-based practice through a dedicated research orientated module that focuses on the theory and application of the research process. This module consolidates previous theory and aims to lead the student towards a detailed and critical understanding of the research process that will prepare them to provide the highest possible standards of safe and effective evidence-based care and also for future professional development such as MSc or Research Studies.

Family, lifestyle and parenting issues are included in year three with a focus on the role of the midwife in facilitating transition to parenthood and early parenting. Identifying and engaging with families at risk through lifestyle issues to provide them with appropriate care and services in conjunction with support agencies is a key role of the contemporary midwife. Issues including inequalities in health care provision and childbirth outcomes, social inclusion and emerging population demographics will be debated. Sociological and Psychological aspects in relation to models of family and society and parenting roles will be included.

Year three students will have the opportunity to design, plan, deliver and evaluate a student-led conference available to other students, academics, clinicians and service users. This conference will develop, consolidate and enhance skills required for life-long learning and autonomous practice at point of registration. Team working, finance, communication, logistical planning and ordering, health and safety, problem solving and leadership are just some of the advanced skills the students will use in order to execute a high quality and relevant conference.

Professional development is enhanced to include advocacy and empowerment with a view to preparing the student for a leadership role in midwifery practice as the lead professional for healthy women with straightforward pregnancies while developing and refining new skills in caring for women with complex medical and obstetric conditions. Midwifery within the political and international arenas will be discussed and student will be encouraged to challenge current practice and delivery of maternity services. This gives the students an opportunity to prepare their skills for registered practice in organising and leading local services for women and families. In addition, during the final six months of the programme, students will be given the necessary learning opportunities, support and supervision to be able to take on the full scope of practice as a midwife at the point of registration.

 

Practice Placements

There are four practice placements in year three of the programme that aim to provide an opportunity for students to consolidate theory with previous practice experience within a leadership framework to prepare students for safe qualified practice. This practice-based module comprises direct hands-on care that is formally assessed and graded and is counted as part of the academic award (NMC Standard 15, 2009).

During the final twelve weeks of practice, the students are assessed at, ‘Independent Level’ (Bondy, 1983) to ensure ‘Fitness to Practise’ in terms of clinical proficiency, expert knowledge and the ability to deliver safe, effective, person-centred and compassionate care.

 

Practice Placements include: Total number of practice weeks = 26 weeks

1. Community: emphasis on Caseload Holding and Normality

2 Labour Ward

3. Pre/Postnatal Ward: emphasis on Ward Management Aspects

By the end of year three, the student midwife has been prepared to a level ‘fit for practise and purpose' (NMC, 2009). The student midwife will identify with the core values of the profession and exhibit graduate attributes that will ensure that the women and the babies they care for experience safe, compassionate care in the appropriate environment.

Following on from the BSc award, graduates can undertake a variety of academic and /or professional course and modules that will enhance their knowledge, skills and understanding and enhance their employability status including: - Masters in Health Studies (Maternal & Child Health) - Mentorship for Professional Practice Module - Effective Clinical Practitioner Module – for newly qualified midwives - Flying Start – for newly qualified midwives  - Variety of relevant PG Certificates e.g. Child Protection - Clinical Education – PG Cert Practice Education - Academic Education – PG Cert Tertiary Level Teaching Methods - Non Medical Prescribing Programme - Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme - Assisted Birth Practitioner – aimed at experienced midwives.

The School of Health and Life Sciences aims at all levels of education to facilitate the student journey to a platform of career long learning and adaptability within the reality of the challenging demographic profile and healthcare needs of the population. The University provides a comprehensive plan of the necessary infrastructure and educational design that optimises the student experience of education and culminates in improved employability. Student engagement in the learning, teaching and assessment processes offers both flexibility and a focus on learner needs. A variety of learning, teaching and assessment approaches are used to enhance delivery of the programme and are informed by external factors, publications and emerging legislation as well as the economic, social and cultural needs of the physical locations for the learners. The learning environment will be enabling, respectful, effective, varied and appropriate to the needs of learners. In addition, the learning environment will aim to focus on collaborative acquisition and creation of knowledge and encourage the students to find, apply, challenge and communicate it in a shared manner. Interprofessional Learning is crucial in relation to the education of healthcare professionals as they are required to work with a variety of other disciplines within the healthcare setting. Embedding interprofessional learning within the curriculum fosters effective working practices including partnership, collaboration, seamless care and multidisciplinary team working, all which contribute to the quality improvement agenda by protecting the public through safe and effective joint care delivery.

A multi-faceted curriculum prepares students for professional registration and employment: The curriculum content is delivered using a range of methods that are designed to develop and replicate the skills of an autonomous practitioner and enable the student to acquire the employability necessary to socialise into the workforce (NMC Standard 12, 2009). The curriculum will foster and encourage research and innovation that underpins teaching at all stages of the curriculum. Embedded in the teaching and learning strategy and central to progress in learning are the concepts of active engagement, structured reflection and constructive feedback. Patient Safety Education is essential and is built into the curriculum using WHO (2011) Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to ensure students are educated in patient safety and thus capable of meeting the needs of the current complex health care environment. An eclectic curriculum model combining theories from education sources has been utilised as the framework for this midwifery programme. The combination of these models demonstrate how the depth and breadth of integration in relation to theory and practice will be progressively achieved throughout the programme. Bruner's (1966) concept of a spiral curriculum permits the introduction and re-introduction of material to evolve. Fundamental concepts can be re-visited and explored in different contexts, from different aspects and at different levels of complexity. This allows knowledge to be delivered according to the student’s needs and developing academic and professional level. Students therefore develop from the known to the unknown and from concrete to abstract concepts, thus deepening their knowledge of the subject as they progress through the programme. Beattie's fourfold model (1987) provides the curriculum with breadth where each subject is developed within the fourfold framework of: 1. A map of key interrelated subjects - that is integrated within: 2. A schedule of related essential skills required for proficiency - undertaken within: 3. Meaningful personal experience - utilising a variety of teaching and learning methods within the context of: 4. An agenda of important cultural issues. Using this multifaceted approach to subject development, the knowledge, understanding and practice of each topic can be explored in a relevant and holistic manner. This is particularly useful as a teaching and learning strategy to integrate midwifery theory with diverse lifestyle against current political thinking. When both models are combined, then subject matter can be explored in breadth using Beattie's fourfold curriculum, and using Bruner's spiral curriculum in increasing depth by introducing and re-introducing the material as the student progresses through the programme. Proficient clinical practice is essential to this curriculum model and this is recognised with the integration of knowledge and practice in relation to Beattie's practical skills teaching and development within the appropriate setting.

The programme will maintain the balance between university (49%) and clinical practice (51%) contexts to effectively promote the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes (NMC Standard 12, 2009). In addition, all clinical practice which is direct hands-on care is assessed, graded and counted towards the award of degree (NMC Standard 15, 2009). Additional hours to support study skills development are contained within the following modules: Life Long Learning 1 (year 1) – 24 hours: To facilitate completion of online Induction Programme; PDP e-portfolio activities; Module activities related to academic study skills e.g. accessing literature online e.g. SIPCEP modules. Life Long Learning 2 (year 2) – 12 hours: To facilitate completion of PDP e-portfolio activities; Practice/Instruction sessions for online completion of academic tests, K2 fetal CTG monitoring training package and Safe Medicate. Life Long learning 3 (year 3) – 18 hours: To facilitate completion of PDP e-portfolio activities; Literature searching and critique skills for year 3 module assessments (Evidence in Practice/Independent Studies); Academic writing skills required for year 3 module assessment (Life Long Learning 3). Teaching Methods include: - Lectures and Modified lectures which will permit the delivery of core theory, ideas and competencies from which debate will be generated. - Face to face tutorials and seminars which will follow lectures to enable the student to further develop aspects of the lecture content in both depth and breadth. - Skills teaching which will take place in the safe environment of the skills labs to permit students to develop midwifery skills before commencing practice placements. Simulated skills practice will continue throughout the 3 years of the programme to facilitate refinement of skills. In cognisance of our VLE – Enhanced online simulation teaching and learning package consisting of anatomy, physiology, scenario training, practical’s, case studies, women’s stories and knowledge tests will assist learning. Skills teaching and development is primarily delivered within the following academic modules using the UWS Skills Laboratories: • Skills for Midwifery Practice – year 1 • Midwifery Knowledge and Practice – year 1 • Emergencies in Childbirth – year 2 • Holistic Care of the Newborn – year 2. Autonomous practice - year 3.

The programme aims to develop in the student a desire for knowledge, understanding and skills and supports this through a learning strategy that promotes and maintains a student-led, active role. To maximise learning, it is crucial that the student takes ownership of their learning and by doing this will facilitate the skills of organising workload, accessing help and support, developing and refining study skills and using a variety of learning methods. The programme seeks to develop in the student expertise for learning and thus delivers the programme using several different learning methods that serve to encourage active participation in the learning process. - E-learning has been developed throughout the programmes. All modules are supported by the UWS Virtual Learning Environment. From the outset, students will undergo an on-line Induction Programme and this will seamlessly take them forward to undertake the programme modules Life-long Learning 1, 2 and 3 which facilitate development of individualised PDP e-portfolio. In Year 2 of the programme, the module Compromised Health will be partly delivered on-line supported by tutorials, e-learning activities and online assessment. In addition, use of Discussion Board as both formative and summative forms of assessment will be utilised. - Online Teaching and Learning Programmes completed during the programme include: • NES SIPCEP modules  • Safe Medicate • K2 Cardiotocograph (CTG) Fetal Heart Monitoring Training Package • Blood Transfusion – Transfusion Science Practice - Experiential Learning is undertaken through Clinical Simulation and is employed throughout the midwifery curriculum.

The student learns the context of midwifery practice and the practical dynamics of team working in the context of computer simulated patient scenarios. Real life clinical conditions and the unpredictability of patient symptoms are replicated using sophisticated software and this includes the range of clinical patient encounters. In addition, skills laboratories have been designed to replicate care settings and there are a variety of models, simulators and equipment with which to simulate care scenarios, and permit the safe practise of core caring skills. - Enquiry-based Learning will be utilised to stimulate debate in relation to ethical, legal and professional issues. Trigger questions will be used in small group sessions to determine management of case scenarios. This encourages learning in terms of team work, managing opinionated discussion and safe resolution of dissent. - Learning through workshops and group project work will also be utilised to stimulate active immersion in the learning process whereby students will be required to participate fully, lead in some instances and work together to produce an outcome. - Reflection: learning through structured reflection encourages the student to think realistically about their personal experience. Evaluating personal experience in relation to care delivered, outcomes and personal and professional attitudes and behaviour provide the student with a unique and intimate review of their status, progress and areas of strengths and weaknesses. Reflection is taught and used as a learning strategy from the outset of the programme to encourage students to more objectively view the impact of their input into events going on around them. - Self-directed learning is incorporated into each study module to encourage students to be active and progressively self-directed in their learning. The amount of self-directed learning is influenced by the nature of specific modules and the level of study being undertaken. Students will be supported with guidance and feedback until they are able to apply self-directed learning effectively. Ultimately, in Year 3 of the programme the student will undertake an in depth Independent Study of their own topic choice in relation to patient safety as part of their academic award. Moving towards independence in self-directed academic learning reflects progressive development in clinical learning where the student moves from dependent status to supported status in preparation for autonomous practice at point of registration. - Oral presentations both on an individual and group basis as a method of assessment facilitate the development and improvement of oral, written, IT and presentation skills. - Written assessment in the form of assignments, workbooks and case-studies will be undertaken by the student. - For the assessment of some clinical skills, simulated skills assessment will be undertaken in the form of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. This will be done in the University skills labs using models/mannequins, actors and computer technology. - Student Conference: Year 3 will culminate in the delivery of a student-led Conference that involves individual and group planning, organising, running and evaluation/reflection. Expert knowledge where appropriate, teaching and learning will be led by external experts from either a theoretical or clinical perspective. In relation to research teaching linkages, research experts within the School will be utilised to demonstrate research in action through their own studies. Clinicians will undertake practice-based skill sessions within the designated skills laboratories.

 

Assessment is undertaken according to UWS regulations. The main aims of assessment are: - to highlight strengths and weaknesses within the student, thus enabling the formulation of realistic goals in order to provide for and achieve personal, academic and professional growth during the programme. - to establish the student’s success or failure in meeting the requirements of the programme and individual student eligibility for the academic and professional awards to which it leads. - to provide a basis for continuing development on a personal, academic and professional level. In order to achieve these aims, a wide variety of assessments will be utilised. In order to support the philosophy of student-centred learning and to ensure that the student derives maximum value from it, assessment should involve active student participation. In addition to this concept, assessment will encompass the primacy of safety and competence in practice and the importance of integration of theory within practice. To this end, each year involves assessments that test the progression of students within the domains of midwifery practice as set out in the Standards for Pre-Registration Midwifery Programmes (NMC 2009). Both formative and summative assessment will be used throughout the programme and will reflect the programme educational philosophy and achievement of aims and outcomes. Formative Assessment - This form of assessment clearly engages the learner with both the lecturer and the learning experience, thus contributing to the learning process. Examples of formative assessment within the programme includes breastfeeding workbook, administration of medicines workbook, practice on-line tests with one-to-one feedback, guided study with associated oral class presentation and peer review, and self-evaluation and appraisal utilising SMOTS. Summative Assessment - This form of assessment is valuable for measurement of achievement, quality and public safety. In relation to Skills-based Assessment (OSCE), students must achieve an aggregate mark of at least 40% and a mean mark of not less than 40% to be attained in each main component of assessment. The module assessments this applies to are: - Skills for Midwifery Practice: OSCE (year 1). The following assessment is informed by professional expectation and is delivered external sector wide. It has a higher overall Pass Mark. - Life Long learning 2: Safe Medicate (year 2), Overall Pass Mark 80%. The following two assessments are informed by professional expectation and are graded as Pass/Fail in accordance with UWS Regulatory Framework, - Neonatal Resuscitation Technique (year 2) - Clinically-based Administration of Medicines Practical Assessment (year 3)

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Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

Using the Spiral Curriculum Model (Bruner, 1987) the programme educational philosophy facilitates the introduction of theory and practical skills to the students that are then re-visited throughout the programme from different perspectives at increasing academic levels. This model supports the development and enhancement of knowledge and skills for life-long learning.

For example: Communication/Interpersonal Skills

Year 1 – Introduction to basic theory and practice of communication: verbal; non verbal; listening skills; recognising barriers; learning terminology.

Year 2 – Development to specialised communication for loss and bereavement counselling; therapeutic communication;
SBAR for emergencies; non judgemental communication techniques.

Year 3 – Enhanced to leadership and management communication: delegation; decision-making; education/teaching of parents; communication with ethnic minorities where English is not first language; advocacy; empowerment.


Employability Skills

The programme aims to prepare student midwives to work and develop their role and sphere of influence within a range of practice settings in a politically and culturally changing environment. To this end, the programme is designed to equip students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for employability as a graduate professional midwife. The programme has utilised the UWS Employability Toolkit as a guide to demonstrate that graduates are appropriately prepared for employability in relation to cognitive skills, generic competencies, personal capabilities, technical abilities, organisational awareness and practical/professional elements.


Specific skills for employability relevant to midwifery practice within the programme include:

  • Breastfeeding – UNICEF Baby Friendly Accredited Programme of Education
  • NES  SIPCEP  – Infection Control Training Modules
  • Safe Medicate– Drug Calculation Training Programme
  • Moving and Handling
  • IV Cannulation
  • Neonatal Resuscitation
  • Immediate Life Support Certificate
  • Preparation for  Detailed Examination of the Newborn
  • K2 Fetal Monitoring Training Package
  • BTS Certificate in Transfusion Science Practice
  • Caseload Holding
  • WHO Patient Safety Curriculum


Graduate Attributes

To  produce UNIVERSAL graduates who are critical thinkers, analytical, enquiring, emotionally intelligent, ethically-minded, culturally aware , collaborative, research aware and socially responsible.

-To produce WORK-READY graduates who are knowledgeable, digitally literate, problem-solvers, effective communicators, influential, motivated, potential leaders, enterprsing and ambitous 

To produce SUCCESSFUL graduates who are autonomous,incisive,innovative, creative,imaginative, resilient,driven,daring and transformational

Personal Development Planning (PDP)

UWS encourages all students to participate in Personal Development Planning (PDP) during their time at the university. UWS define PDP as:

“A structured and supported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon their own learning and/or achievement and to plan for their personal education and career development”.

PDP is embedded within the midwifery programme and reflects the student’s ability to manage themselves initially during the theory and where applicable, practice components of learning. Thereafter PDP is instrumental in securing successful employment and pursuing a career pathway in midwifery. PDP is essential to this process and therefore is identified as a subject in its own right in the programme and is formatively assessed by means of Learning Development Units consisting of reflective activities that are completed online and contained as part of an ongoing online e-portfolio of evidence of achievement. Students are encouraged to ‘share’ their e-portfolio PDP activities with their Personal Tutor on a regular basis and they are reviewed as part of the annual student/personal tutor end of year meeting.

Students have structured PDP Learning Development Units (structured workbooks) for the duration of the three-year programme that guide them in relation to learning and reflective activities related to academic and practice knowledge, skills and attitudes. Study time is allocated within each trimester of the programme to permit students to complete the activities including reflections following practice placements.

The use of active PDP also meets the requirements of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) who state that practitioners must:

  • “Keep up to date with new developments in practice.
  • Think and reflect for yourself
  • Demonstrate that you are keeping up to date and developing your practice
  • Provide a high standard for practice and care” (NMC, 2018)

Completion of the PDP Learning Development Units fulfils NMC requirements in encouraging student to commence the process of critical reflection and evaluation of their personal and professional knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes through the programme.


Reflective Practice

In addition, reflective practice is utilised routinely within a variety of modules and other activities including:

  • Breastfeeding Workbook – spans the three-year programme and ask students to reflect on case scenarios and personal performance in line with UNICEF BFI Standards.
  • QI/Patient Safety Education – student are asked to routinely reflect within each topic area in relation to impact on harm minimisation and their role.
  • Reflection through Peer Review Discussion and Assessment in relation to management of Student Conference.
  • Risk Assessment: Commencing with introduction to Care Pathways (year 1); Discussion of ‘real-life’ scenarios within Compromised Health Module (year 2) and management of risk in Autonomous Practice Module (year 3).
  • NES SIPCEP  Training modules  requires extensive reflection on Clinical Performance in relation to Infection Control.
  • Clinical Practice: Students are asked to complete a personal reflection in relation to every practice placement, identifying strengths, weaknesses and areas for improvement. In addition, students are asked to reflect on the knowledge, skills and attitudes they learned and how they would use this learning to inform future practice.

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

Placement Learning takes place when a student applies learning in a work situation, for which learning outcomes are identified, in the fulfilment of which the students is supported by appropriate teaching and guidance, and credit is awarded . In addition, placement learning adheres to the UWS Good Practice Guidelines for Work Based Learning and UWS Health and Safety Policy for Work-based/Placement Learning.

The core aspect of the programme is the integration of theory with practice to provide meaningful learning experiences and the progression towards safe and competent standards of midwifery. The role of practical experience further promotes cognitive, affective and psychomotor development. The programme consists of 49% theory and 51% clinical practice, where theory is taught first and relevant practice placement follows in discernible blocks to facilitate integration of theory with practice. Placement Learning is integral to the content and credibility of the Pre-registration Midwifery programme (NMC Standard 12, 2009).

Students will undertake practice placements in the following clinical areas:

  • Royal Alexandra Maternity Unit, Paisley.
  •  Ayrshire Maternity Unit, Crosshouse Hospital, Kilmarnock.
  •  Vale of Leven Community Midwifery Unit.• Inverclyde Community Midwifery Unit, Greenock.
  •  Rural Placements  in Montrose, Dunoon, Lochgilphead, Oban, Rothesay, Campbeltown and Isle of Arran
  •  Wishaw Maternity Unit, Wishaw General Hospital
  •  Day Assessment Unit, Wishaw, Airdrie  and East Kilbride
  •  Dumfries Maternity Unit, Cresswell Hospital, Dumfries
  •  Community Areas Lanarkshire
  • Community Areas Dumfries
  •  Rural Placement in Montrose, Dunoon, Lochgilphead, Oban, Rothesay, Campbeltown, Stranraer and Isle of Arran.
  • Princess Royal Maternity Unit, Glasgow and associated community areas
  • Queen Elizabeth University Hospital maternity unit, Glasgow and associated community areas

Practice based learning is achieved through the 51% practice component of the programme. Students must achieve specified clinical proficiencies for year one before progressing to year two, and specified proficiencies for year two of the programme prior to progressing to year three and must achieve and maintain the mandatory NMC competencies for professional registration. The clinical setting as an educational environment is optimised through the negotiation of clinical learning experiences and regular audit by UWS (NMC Standard 11, 2009). Consent for the student to be involved in women's care will be sought at each episode of care. Women can choose to withdraw consent at any time without prejudice.

All programmes of education and preparation for midwifery practice are required to formally accredit clinical practice. All clinical placements within this programme comprise direct hand-on care and are formally assessed, graded and counted as part of the academic award (NMC Standard 15, 2009; Scottish Executive Subject Benchmark Statement, Midwifery, 2009). In addition, practice placement learning meets the national standards of NHS Education for Scotland, Quality Standards for Practice Placements (NMC, 2008). All practice placements and practice learning is supported by Part 2: Standards for Student Supervision and Assessment (NMC, 2018). Students will be have the opportunity to achieve proficiencies out lined in the Standards of Proficiency for Midwives (NMC, 2019).

Clinical knowledge and skills is accredited using a criterion-referenced rating scale (Bondy, 1983) to assess clinical proficiency through achievement of specific competencies (NMC, 2009). The assessment of each student is undertaken by a tripartite approach comprising the Practice supervisor, Practice assessor and Academic assessor in conjunction with the student to ensure that they are achieving their proficiencies and able to progress (NMC, 2108). A selection of practice placement documentation is scrutinised by the external examiner.

Skills development through the direct integration of theory with practice within practice placements is assessed within the following modules:

Midwifery Care in Practice 1: year 1, 100% direct hand-on care - 20 credits
Midwifery Care in Practice 2: year 2, 100% direct hand-on care - 20 credits
Midwifery Care in Practice 3: year 3, 100% direct hand-on care - 20 credits


Support

The key aspect of practice placements is to give the student the opportunity to integrate the learned theory into safe, effective practice. Whilst on placement, students are allocated a Practice supervisor, who will predominately be a midwife but they can also be other allied health professionals (Midwife, Nurse, Social worker, Radiographer). The Practice supervisor is responsible for the students teaching and learning in practice (NMC, 2018). Students will also be allocated a Practice assessor who is a registered midwife and responsible for their practice assessment (NMC, 2018).

In addition, students will be supported by Academic assessors (midwifery academics) who are responsible for student progression. Through this tripartite arrangement of Practice supervisor, Practice assessor and Academic assessor along with the student there will be review, reflection of learning and progress and assessment (NMC, 2018).

Placement learning assessment documentation conforms to the National Approach to Practice Assessment Documentation for the Pre-registration Nursing and Midwifery Programmes in Scotland (NES, 2011). Students complete an ‘Ongoing Achievement Record’ that details competency based on NMC Standards of Proficiency for Pre-registration Midwifery Education (2010) and NMC Essential Skills Clusters (2007).  In addition, at the end of each practice placement (Part), the Practice assessor, Academic assessor and student (NMC 2018) will complete a 'placement summary' that acts as an additional ongoing record of achievement that is passed from one placement to the next to enable judgements to be made on the student's progress (NMC Standard 16, 2009).

Practice placements within the programme contribute toward the overall graduate award with the exception of the Women’s Health Practice Placement (4 weeks in year 2). Due to the fragmented nature of the Women’s Health Placement (comprises 1 week in Daycare Unit, 1 week in Early Pregnancy Unit and 2 weeks in Gynaecology) it is not possible to give a mark and grade for clinical proficiency. However, to ensure that clinical knowledge and practice is integrated, the students complete a competency checklist that acts as a learning agreement that must be signed as achieved by the Practice supervisor and Practice assessor in each area. Students must successfully complete the competency agreement in order to complete the module.

Credit is achieved using the following tools:

  • UWS Grading Scale – UWS Regulatory Framework
  • Bondy’s Criterion Referenced Rating Scale (1983)


Practice Placements
Total number of practice placement weeks in year 1: 21 weeks
Total number of practice placement weeks in year 2: 21 weeks
Total number of practice placement weeks in year 3: 26 weeks
Total number of practice placement weeks in programme: 68 weeks

Year 1:

There are three practice placements in Year 1 where the student will be exposed to normal, low risk midwifery practice. The key aspect of clinical placements is to give the student the opportunity to integrate the learned theory into safe, effective practice. Whilst on clinical placement, students are allocated a Practice supervisor (midwife or other allied health professional) and Practice assessor (who is a registered midwife) who will teach, guide and assess them in relation to the Standards of Proficiencies (NMC, 2018). In addition, they will be supported by an Academic assessor (Midwifery academic) who will review their progression in liaison with the Practice supervisor and Practice assessor.  The placements are as follows and are assessed within Midwifery Care in Practice 1 Module:

1. Community
2. Labour Ward
3. Pre/postnatal ward

Students are expected to successfully pass all three practice placements (components) in order to successfully complete the module (NMC Standard 15, 2009).

By the end of Year 1, the students will be able to provide holistic care to healthy woman and their babies during pregnancy, labour and the postnatal period and demonstrate awareness of professional issues within midwifery practice.


Year 2:

There are four clinical placements in Year 2 that reflect the high risk/compromised health theoretical content of the year to allow integration of theory with practice. Students are expected to successfully pass all three practice placements (components) in order to successfully complete the module (NMC Standard 15, 2009). Whilst on clinical placement, students are allocated a Practice supervisor (midwife or other allied health professional) and Practice assessor (who is a registered midwife) who will teach, guide and assess them in relation to the Standards of Proficiencies (NMC, 2018). In addition, they will be supported by an Academic assessor (Midwifery academic) who will review their progression in liaison with the Practice supervisor and Practice assessor.  The placements are as follows and are assessed within Midwifery Care in Practice 2 Module:

1. Women’s Health: includes Gynaecology, Daycare, Early Pregnancy Assessment (not summatively assessed)
2. Labour Ward/ Pre – postnatal ward: including High risk labour care, Theatre, High Dependency and Triage
3. Neonatal Unit
4. Community – To facilitate commencement of caseload holding.

By the end of Year 2, the student will be equipped to care for woman, their babies and their families when childbirth is compromised and where there are complications necessitating medical/surgical intervention. In addition, the student will be able to care for women during a critical/emergency situation.

Year 3:

There are four clinical placements in Year 3 which include twelve weeks at the end of the Year known as, ’Fitness for Practice’ in which the student should be clinically proficient at an Independent Level in preparation for registration. Students are expected to successfully pass all four practice placements (components) in order to successfully complete the module (NMC Standard 15, 2009). Whilst on clinical placement, students are allocated a Practice supervisor (midwife or other allied health professional) and Practice assessor (who is a registered midwife) who will teach, guide and assess them in relation to the Standards of Proficiencies (NMC, 2018). In addition, they will be supported by an Academic assessor (Midwifery academic) who will review their progression in liaison with the Practice supervisor and Practice assessor.  The placements are as follows and are assessed within Midwifery Care in Practice 3 Module:

1. Labour Ward
2. Community
3. Pre/postnatal Ward Area

By the end of Year 3, the student will have been prepared to a level ‘fit for practice and purpose’. They will be a reflective practitioner capable of critical thinking and reasoning. They will be a safe, effective, competent and compassionate practitioner ready for work as a qualified midwife.


Cause for Concern Process: Supportive Action to Be Taken If a Student Fails To Achieve Clinical Proficiencies

Where there are concerns about a student's progress at any point during the programme, UWS has an established procedure that is promptly initiated (NMC Standard 16, 2009). This is a supportive procedure aimed at identifying and addressing the student's needs quickly and effectively.  Where there is cause for concern, including failure to attain clinical competencies and/ or standards of professional behaviour, students should be positively supported through this process in order to address the situation. Should students continue to fail to meet professional requirements, then they should be referred to Fitness to Practice (NMC 2008).

The law, University of West of Scotland Regulations and Professional Requirements all provide frameworks within which appropriate conduct and the consequences of misconduct are defined in a number of general and specific ways for student nurses and midwives.

For these programmes the University must also be confident that students of nursing and midwifery are fit to practise their chosen career and hence eligible for registration or re-registration with the Statutory Professional Body, namely the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), which will enable them to practise as a registered nurse or midwife.

“Students must be of good mental and physical health; display appropriate professional conduct and be competent to practice. It must be emphasised that students have an individual responsibility to ensure they meet the aforementioned requirements and as such will be asked to confirm that they have read relevant guidelines pertaining to this”

The justification for fitness to practise arrangements is fundamentally that of protection of the public interest in safeguarding client wellbeing. The student of nursing/midwifery is required to demonstrate a Duty of Care (a sensitive, reliable and responsible approach) towards others. The student is required to demonstrate these qualities in general attitude and behaviour towards other students, staff of the University and in the practice areas towards client(s), carers, staff and the general public. Students are obligated to learn, accept and demonstrate the responsibility and accountability demanded of practitioners in health care services.

“A student who fails to demonstrate appropriate standards of behaviour, either at University or on practice placement, may be deemed to be professionally unsuitable.”

It should be added that similar issues arise with regard to problems with the health and intellectual ability of students, which may affect their fitness to practise safely or complete their professional training.

The Policy and Procedure for Withdrawal on Grounds of Professional Unsuitability applies to nursing and midwifery programmes where there are compulsory integral periods of professional placement and for which there are behavioural and health requirements which must be met to ensure suitability to practise and eligibility for registration.

A key aim of this Policy is to highlight with transparency and openness, the framework within which cases are to be considered by the University in conjunction with University regulations. In addition, the process to be taken in consideration of each case clearly maps out where the student engages within the process and provides a pathway or protocol for the management of cases whereby remedial action or termination of training would be invoked. The system is transparent, workable and capable of being quality assured.

Self Declaration

In accordance with NMC Standards 3 and 4 (NMC, 2009) the Lead Midwife for Education (LME) must obtain evidence of the students good health and good character as part of the selection, admission and ongoing monitoring process to ensure safe and effective practice as a midwife, on entry to, and for continued participation in programmes leading to registration with the NMC. Initially this is done by means of reviewing references, checking documents, obtaining satisfactory Occupational Health Review, obtaining satisfactory PVG (Protection of Vulnerable Groups) and asking the student to sign a declaration of good health and character prior to being offered a place on the programme.

In conjunction with the Fitness to Practice Policy within the School, there is a requirement that continuing students declare any changes to their health and PVG status. This declaration of good health and character shall be completed at the progression points and contained within the paperwork utilised for the modules Midwifery Care in Practice 1, 2 and 3.

It is also the LME's responsibility for signing the supporting declaration of good health and good character for all midwifery applications to the NMC Register on completion of the programme. The LME has the right to refuse to sign any supporting declaration where the available evidence identifies that the student may not be of sufficient good health or good character to carry out safe and effective practice as a midwife (NMC Standard 3, 2009).

Conditions of entry to the BSc Midwifery programme stipulate that Occupational Health must approve all prospective students as being fit to undertake the programme. Further to this all students must have a satisfactory PVG (Protection of Vulnerable Groups) check.

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

For the purposes of this programme, this equates to the following:

For practice based modules students must attend minimum of 80% of module to sit assessment and make up attendance to 100%.
For theory based modules students are required to attend minimum of 75% of module to sit assessment

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Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate sound knowledge and understanding of the physiological processes that affect the body systems (woman and fetus/baby) during normal pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium.
A2Develop sound knowledge and demonstrate understanding of evidence based midwifery care and management provided to women and their families during normal pregnancy,labour and the puerperium.
A3Demonstrate sound knowledge of professional, ethical and legal issues relating to the role and practice of the midwife and the Nursing and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct governing the profession.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Safely and competently deliver basic caring midwifery skills in relation to the activities of daily living.
B2Safely and competently assess, plan, deliver and evaluate midwifery care to women and their babies during pregnancy, labour and the puerperium.
B3Deliver safe evidence-based care to women and their families across a variety of care settings.
B4Undertake health and midwifery care within a holistic framework incorporating the physical, social, psychological, spiritual, educational and cultural needs of the individual.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Acquire knowledge and skills in handling information technology related to client care, health promotion and continuing professional development.
C2Function as part of a multi-disciplinary/multi-agency team with appropriate interpersonal and communication skills.
C3Acquire skills in numeracy necessary for safe client care.
C4Search, extract and present information using information technology.
C5Interpret and record graphical information and apply a range of numerical and statistical Skills.

Respond to and produce both oral and written, complex communication.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Engage in an ongoing evaluation of all evidence-based care delivered, making appropriate changes as required.
D2Analyse, issue, plan and review tasks and care delivery using problem-solving activities, reflection and critical thinking.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Engage in teamwork, multi-professional, interagency and collaborative working, implementing an agreed care plan under supervision.
E2Value and demonstrate a commitment to promoting health and social care for women, their families and the wider community irrespective of gender, age, race, ability, sexuality, economic status, lifestyle, culture, religious or political beliefs.
E3Understand the importance and professional requirements of professional practice and accountability in different healthcare settings and employer contexts.
E4Value themselves as growing professionals by taking responsibility and evaluating their lifelong learning reflective practice and professional development.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7MIDW07016Maternal Health and Wellbeing20      
7MIDW07018Midwifery Care in Practice 1 MW20      
7MIDW07019Midwifery Knowledge and Practice20      
7MIDW07017Skills For Midwifery Practice MW20      
7MIDW07020Life Sciences and Childbirth20      
7MIDW07015Life Long Learning 1 MW20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
In exception to UWS Regulatory Framework pass marks – assessment and components for midwifery programmes would instead adhere to NMC Standards for non-use of compensation within assessment (NMC Quality Assurance Framework, June 2013, updated 2017).Where a module assessment comprises two or more components - each component must be successfully passed at the minimum pass mark required for the overall module pass. This ensures that components do not compensate for each other to deliver an overall aggregate pass mark. I.e. BSc level: each component must be passed at a minimum of 40%, and the aggregate pass mark should be 40%.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

As per UWS Regulatory Framework . In order for the student to progress to the next academic level on the programme the student must:

- Have successfully completed all level 7 modules (6 core modules) attaining 120 credits at SCQF Level 7.
- Successfully achieve and confirmed all outcomes within the progression period (academic year) within 12 weeks of entering the next academic level (NMC Standard 15, 2009).


Criteria for Award

Students who have successfully achieved 120 credits at SCQF level 7 from this programme, and who wish to exit at this point, will be eligible for the award of Certificate of Higher Education in Health Studies. This award carries no professional recognition from the NMC.



B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate sound knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiological processes which affect the body systems (woman and fetus/baby), compromising pregnancy, labour and the puerperium.
A2Develop sound knowledge and demonstrate understanding of evidence based midwifery care and management provided to women and their families during ‘high risk’ pregnancy, labour and the puerperium.
A3Demonstrate sound knowledge of professional, ethical and legal issues relating to the role and practice of the midwife and the Nursing and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct governing the profession when caring for woman at risk.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Safely and competently assess and deliver midwifery care to women and their babies during compromised pregnancy, labour and the puerperium.
B2Deliver safe, evidence-based care to women at risk, and their families across a variety of care settings.
B3Manage emergency situations within midwifery practice according to practice guidelines, protocols and policies.
B4Undertake health and midwifery care within a holistic framework incorporating the physical, social, psychological, spiritual, educational and cultural needs of the individual at risk.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Utilise detailed knowledge and skills in handling information technology related to client care, health promotion and continuing professional development.
C2Develop appropriate interpersonal and communication skills required to function as part of a high risk multiprofessional team.
C3Acquire skills in numeracy necessary for safe client care in compromised and emergency situations.
C4Search, extract and present graphical information using information technology and interpret and evaluate graphical information and apply a range of numerical and statistical skills.
C5Respond to and produce both oral and written, complex communication.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Analyse all evidence-based care delivered, making appropriate changes as required.
D2Inform practice, using evidence-based information, thus demonstrating clear integration of theory with practice.
D3Evaluate and analyse issues, plan and review tasks and care delivery using problem-solving activities, reflection and critical thinking.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Engage in team work, multi-professional, interagency and collaborative working implementing agreed care plans with minimal supervision.
E2Value and demonstrate a commitment to promoting health and providing midwifery and social care for women at risk, their families and the wider community irrespective of gender, age, race, ability, sexuality, economic status, lifestyle, culture, religious or political beliefs.
E3Apply the principles of professional practice and accountability in different healthcare settings in accordance with the NMC Code of Practice.
E4Value themselves as growing professionals by taking responsibility for their lifelong.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8MIDW08010Life Long Learning 220      
8MIDW08009Midwifery Care in Practice 2 MW20      
8MIDW08003Emergencies in Childbirth20       long thin modue
8MIDW08001Compromised Health20      
8MIDW08007Holistic Care of The Newborn L820      
8MIDW08008Women's Mental Health and Wellbeing20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
In exception to UWS Regulatory Framework pass marks – assessment and components for midwifery programmes would instead adhere to NMC Standards for non-use of compensation within assessment (NMC Quality Assurance Framework, June 2013, updated 2017).Where a module assessment comprises two or more components - each component must be successfully passed at the minimum pass mark required for the overall module pass. This ensures that components do not compensate for each other to deliver an overall aggregate pass mark. I.e. BSc level: each component must be passed at a minimum of 40%, and the aggregate pass mark should be 40%.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

As per UWS Regulatory Framework . In order for the student to progress to the next academic level on the programme the student must:

- Have successfully completed all level 8(6 core modules) attaining 120 credits at SCQF Level 8.
- Successfully achieve and confirmed all outcomes within the progression period (academic year) within 12 weeks of entering the next academic level (NMC Standard 15, 2009).


Criteria for Award

Students who have successfully achieved 120 credits at SCQF level 8 from this programme, and who wish to exit at this point, will be eligible for the award of Diploma of Higher Education in Health Studies. This award carries no professional recognition from the NMC.





C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Apply sound knowledge and understanding in relation to the midwife as lead carer for women within ‘normality’ in childbirth.
A2Apply sound knowledge and understanding of the role of ‘management’ within midwifery practice.
A3Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the ‘teaching’ role of the midwife.
A4Apply broad and detailed integrated knowledge of professional, ethical and legal issues relating to the role and practice of the midwife and the Nursing and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct governing the profession.
A5Critically analyse and evaluate the clinical contribution of research to midwifery practice.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Safely and competently assess, plan, deliver and evaluate midwifery care to women and their babies during pregnancy, labour and the puerperium at an independent level.
B2Deliver safe, evidence-based practice to women and their families across a variety of care settings.
B3Function at an independent level through the concept of caseload holding.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Be proficient in handling information technology related to client care, health promotion and continuing professional development.
C2Within the multi-disciplinary/multi-agency team demonstrate skilled interpersonal and communication skills.
C3Demonstrate skills in formal and informal presentations to a range of audiences.
C4Search, extract and analyse information using information technology.
C5Interpret and analyse graphical information and apply a range of numerical and statistical skills.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Critically appraise evidence-based care delivered making, appropriate changes as required.
D2Critically analyse issues, plan and review tasks and care delivery using problem solving activities, reflection and critical thinking.
D3Actively self-direct learning and undertake independent project work.
D4Expertly manage and organise a student conference.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Engage in responsible, autonomous practice and recognise the role of advocacy in midwifery practice.
E2Apply knowledge of professional, ethical and legal issues relating to midwifery practice and the responsibilities that these impose on the midwife’s professional practice.
E3Actively promote health and the delivery of a high standard of midwifery and social care for women, their families and the wider community irrespective of gender, age ability, sexuality, economic status, lifestyle, culture, religious or political beliefs.
E4Take sole responsibility for life-long learning, reflective practice and professional development.
E5Engage in teamwork, multi-disciplinary, interagency and collaborative working.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9MIDW09030Autonomous Practice20      
9MIDW09031Evidence in Practice: MW20      
9MIDW09032Independent Study: MW20       long thin module
9MIDW09033Meeting Family and Lifestyle Needs20      
9MIDW09002Life Long Learning 320      
9MIDW09019Midwifery Care in Practice 3 MW20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
In exception to UWS Regulatory Framework pass marks – assessment and components for midwifery programmes would instead adhere to NMC Standards for non-use of compensation within assessment (NMC Quality Assurance Framework, June 2013, updated 2017).Where a module assessment comprises two or more components - each component must be successfully passed at the minimum pass mark required for the overall module pass. This ensures that components do not compensate for each other to deliver an overall aggregate pass mark. I.e. BSc level: each component must be passed at a minimum of 40%, and the aggregate pass mark should be 40%.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

As per UWS Regulatory Framework

Students who have successfully achieved 120 credits at SCQF level 9 from this programme will exit with the award of BSc Midwifery.

Additional Exit Criteria

Level of absence does not preclude completion of either academic module (75% attendance) or practice placement (100% attendance)
Distinction
Students will be awarded Distinction if they meet the academic requirements as set down in the UWS Regulatory Framework .



D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Award


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Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.

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Version Number: 1.07

2014 University of the West of Scotland

University of the West of Scotland is a Registered Scottish Charity.

Charity number SC002520.