Page Navigation

Undergraduate Programme Specifications

This page displays the selected undergraduate programme specification.

Printer friendly version Printer friendly version

Session: 2022/23

Last modified: 23/07/2022 17:22:40

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Criminal Justice and Forensic Science Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
BSc  Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
Dip HE  Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
Cert HE  Criminal Justice and Forensic Science

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:
Maximum Period of Registration:6
Mode of Study:Full Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:Dr Ciaran T Ewins

[Top of Page]


Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Scottish Highers: BBBC (102 UCAS Tariff points) including National 5 Chemistry or Biology (at least at Grade C)


or GCE

A levels: CDD (88 UCAS Tariff points) including GCSE Chemistry or Biology (at least at Grade 4)


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Advanced entry is possible to Year 2 for suitably qualified applicants with a background in Criminal Justice and Science, for example a Cert HE in Criminology and Forensic Science. Applications are considered on an individual and case-by-case basis

SQA HNC / BTEC Level 4 HNC / CertHE: Police Studies or Policing or Social Sciences or Legal Services with Criminology & Policing (for SQA HNCs, with Grade B, or above, in the Graded Unit) plus SQA Higher Chemistry and Biology or equivalent


Other Required Qualifications/Experience


Further desirable skills pre-application

[Top of Page]


General Overview

The BSc (Hons) Criminal Justice and Forensic Science programme offers an opportunity to study criminal justice theory, research and policy alongside the forensic science vital to modern investigations. It is a four-year, full-time programme that draws on elements from existing programmes in these areas. It covers the study of concepts, theories, structures, organisations, processes and practices involved with the prevention, investigation and prosecution of crime, the workings of the criminal law and criminal court system and the treatment of offenders. The forensic science content is developed along themes of crime scene examination, drugs, alcohol and evidence interpretation.  It is based on progressive levels of study, with students gradually developing scientific knowledge and research and inquiry skills applicable to the interface between criminal justice and science.   

Level 7 students will study the differences between deviant and criminal behaviour, the foundations of criminal law, and the way in which the criminal justice system operates. In parallel the foundations of future forensic science study will be laid with an introduction to molecular science, data analysis and forensic science. 

At Levels 8 & 9 the theoretical underpinnings for understanding crime and justice, the nature of policing, and contemporary theoretical perspectives on crime such as gender, power, race and class. There are a range of modules that develop knowledge in areas such as Penology, Policing, Youth Offending, Gangs, Global Security, Victimology and Comparative Criminal Justice. 

At level 8 & 9 science study will build student’s knowledge of topics important to forensic science such as evidence evaluation, drug analysis, DNA profiling and microscopy. Laboratory and crime scene skills are also developed.   

Overall, the design of the criminal justice modules seeks to provide students with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the nature of crime, criminal justice and criminal justice systems, locally, nationally and globally, and with a range of key transferrable critical, analytical and evaluative skills.  

[Top of Page]


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

UWS’ Graduate Attributes focus on academic, personal and professional skills. Throughout the programmes these skills develop graduates who are universally prepared, work-ready and successful. At UWS the attributes expected from our graduates are set out in the “I am UWS” programme.

Embedded employability activity will help ensure that graduates will be work-ready and will have globally relevant skills as British policing and forensic science is very highly regarded internationally.  Ensuring students are highly employable and able to make a difference locally and globally’ is a key aim of the University’s Education Enabling Plan, 

Alignment with the UWS Educational Enabling plan will ensure that teaching and assessment methods encourage graduates to develop and enthusiasm for learning and an ability to transfer knowledge into practice at diverse locations such as the laboratory, the crime scene and the court room.

The Criminal Justice and Forensic Science programme provides opportunities throughout the levels to enable graduate attributes to be developed and focussed appropriately.

Critical analytical and inquiry skills are developed and used to solve industry related problems wherever possible. The programme promotes awareness of work related issues with a variety of group exercises such as mock crime scenes or moot courts. 

Ethical awareness and social responsibility is developed throughout and is formalised in the Level 10 research project where School/University ethical approval is sought if required.

Links to current University research are promoted through the programme with examples embedded in teaching and opportunities for students to become involved.

Employability – The School regularly receives interest from companies to engage with our students and we are keen to facilitate this where we see benefits for our students. Our students benefit from a number of specific employability events including an invited industrial speakers and an annual ‘Working with Industry’ event. 

Personal Development Planning (PDP) within the programme is based on four strands: personal tutor support, a number of modules linked to PDP outcomes, support for development of an ePortfolio, and a number of events relating to PDP.

A personal tutor is identified for each student, and students are expected to meet with their personal tutors on a regular basis - at least once per term- to discuss issues relating to PDP, including progress, development goals and aspirations.

A number of modules core to the programme at each level have activities that are  strongly linked to PDP themes, and these are:

First year:

Science and Crime CHEM07006 – Making presentations, group working

Scottish Criminal Justice CRIM07002 – Professional issues

Second year: 

Chemical Lab Techniques CHEM08013 – Report writing, data analysis

Introduction to Policing CRIM08008– Careers and professional workshops 

Third year:

Forensic Lab Techniques CHEM09023 – Group Working, report writing, literature research

Designer Drugs CHEM09023 - CV preparation and interview techniques

Youth Justice CRIM09007 – workshops from professional staff, children’s panel presentation

Honours year: 

The Honours year involves a research project which will develop many skills such as literature research and evaluation, time management and planning, research skills, report writing and presentation skills.

Victimology CRIM10001– Poster presentations to professional audience.

Criminal Justice and Forensic Science Project module - oral presentation of research results

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

Students have the option of a one year placement after level 9 of the programme. If selected, the sandwich placement is designed for students to gain and reflect on work experience attained during their time in the workplace. Students undertaking a sandwich placement are required to undertake PDP and maintain a portfolio from which they will be required to produce a comprehensive learning log report charting their development during placement which is assessed on a pass /fail basis. The student will be required, through reflection, to explore their own role within their placement organisation and to take account of the roles and responsibilities of themselves and others in the context of the structures in which they operate. On successful completion of the placement, the learner will be more employable as a result of having developed their ability to integrate essential generic skills and attributes with subject/discipline related knowledge.

The placement will be governed by a tripartite learning agreement between the student, placement provider and the University which defines the learning outcomes and confirms elements of support and commitment from all parties. The agreement will be signed by each party prior to the start of the placement.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the placement the student will be able to:

•  L1.Critically relate elements of the placement work experience to the main themes and issues of their subject discipline relevant within the workplace and be confident in articulating this to others

•  L2. Analyse organisational cultures, capabilities and structures with particular relevance to the current workplace and exhibit the ability to critically evaluate employee roles in an applied setting.

•  L3. Recognise, critically assess and be able to clearly demonstrate to others the personal development and application of essential employability skills and  attributes within a real work situation.

Assessment

Assessment will be based on pass/fail only and all assessment elements must be passed for progression as part of the Sandwich programme. Assignments will be open to external examination in accordance with University regulations.

 

Progression/Award

• Placement students will be assigned to a specific School assessment panels.

• The relevant Programme Panel will consider the performance of each sandwich placement student enrolled on that Programme and decide eligibility for reassessment, progression and awards in accordance with University Regulations.

• A student who fails the sandwich placement after reassessment will no longer be eligible for a “with sandwich” award. They will either progress to level 9 or 10 (as appropriate) of a non-sandwich equivalent programme or exit with an equivalent non-sandwich award.

Successful completion of the placement element will result in the award of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science (sandwich).

Engagement

In line with the Academic Engagement Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on the relevant learning platform, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Where a programme has Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body requirements these will be listed here:

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy

The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy

[Top of Page]


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of criminal justice and forensic sciences 
A2Relate scientific knowledge and approaches to a forensic science context
A3Demonstrate a range of knowledge of basic theories, concepts and principles of criminal justice.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply knowledge and understanding of criminal justice and forensic science to selected issues related to crime.
B2Begin to understand and acquire the conventions of appropriate academic discourse and communication in science and criminal justice disciplines
B3Distinguish criminal justice knowledge based on evidence and/or research from other forms of explanation, e.g. anecdotal
B4Apply knowledge and understanding of forensic investigations to selected case situations.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Explain basic criminal justice concepts and ideas in a coherent form.
C2Use oral and written forms of communication effectively in both formal and informal contexts.
C3Use appropriate applications, including databases and the internet, to access information related to the investigation of crime.
C4Explain forensic science techniques and concepts in an easily understood manner

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Evaluate arguments, information and ideas which form the basis of criminal investigations.
D2Reflect on the appropriateness and validity of developed results and arguments.
D3Consider contemporary real world issues from a criminal justice perspective.
D4Evaluate the quality and meaning of forensic science results

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Be able to engage in and demonstrate a capacity for independent study.
E2Identify and recognise the importance of self-management of their own learning.
E3Collaborate effectively with others in shared tasks to achieve a common goal.
E4Take responsibility for agreed elements of group tasks.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7CHEM07006Science & Crime20check mark  
7CRIM07002Scottish Criminal Justice20check mark  
7APPD07001ASPIRE20check markcheck mark 
7CRIM07001History of Crime & Justice20 check mark 
7CHEM07013Molecules of Life20 check mark 
7CRIM07004Scottish Criminal Law20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress to L8, students must meet the criteria outlined in University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13 – 3.14). For information on progression with credit deficit in core and optional modules please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13).
Those students entering the programme at SCQF level 7, and who successfully achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 7 (including all core modules) can exit with Cert HE in Criminal Justice and Forensic Science should they choose not to progress to the next level of the programme.
For information on the award of distinction please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.25 – 3.26).
Students successfully achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 7 (but not including all core modules) can exit with Cert HE in Combined Studies, see Reg 1.61


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of aspects of science and criminalistics related to forensic science
A2Display a knowledge of the statistical evaluation of evidence
A3Show some knowledge of major current issues in forensic science
A4Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of contemporary developments in policing
A5Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the wider social and political relationship between crime and society.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply a basic range of analytic techniques appropriate to a research question or problem.
B2Show an awareness of a range of criminal justice and criminology sources and identify their validity.
B3Use a range of routine skills, techniques and practices in the forensic science laboratory
B4Carry out routine collection and investigations of evidential material

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Present numerical, graphical and verbal information in a variety of forms suitable for scientific and non-scientific audiences
C2Understand and interpret quantitative and qualitative data.
C3Communicate complex ideas in well -structured and coherent form using appropriate academic conventions.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Apply critical thinking evaluation and synthesis of information relating to the main ideas and concepts relevant to forensic science and criminal justice studies.
D2Summarise and evaluate competing explanations and interpretations of social phenomena from a methodological perspective.
D3Analyse and apply criminal justice research findings to real-world situations.
D4Display a critical evaluation of solutions and explanations of experimental information and observations

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in defined educational activities
E2Take responsibility for work planning and time management within specified contexts
E3Co-operate in group working exercises
E4Work under guidance on current professional practice and issues

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8CHEM08013Chemical Laboratory Techniques20check mark  
8CRIM08002Criminology Foundations20check mark  
8CHEM08007Evaluating Forensic Evidence20 check mark 
8CRIM08008Introduction to Policing20check mark  
8CHEM08015Pharmacology, drugs & behaviour.20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8CHEM08016Introductory Forensic Science20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
The recommended Optional module is CHEM08016 Introductory Forensic Science. Other optional modules from any suitable subject area may be taken, subject to pre-requisite requirements.

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress to L9, students must meet the criteria outlined in University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13 – 3.14). For information on progression with credit deficit in core and optional modules please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13).
Those students who successfully achieve 240 credits at SCQF level 7 & 8 (including all core modules) can exit with Dip HE in Criminal Justice and Forensic Science should they choose not to progress to the next level of the programme.
For information on the award of distinction please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.25 – 3.26).
Students successfully achieve 240 credits at SCQF level 7 & 8 (but not including all core modules) can exit with Dip HE in Combined Studies, see Reg 1.61


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad range of knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of official responses to crime and offending behaviour and their relationship to social change.
A2Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of a number of specialised areas of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science.
A3Demonstrate a broad and integrated knowledge and understanding of issues related to drugs and alcohol relevant to forensic science
A4Show a broad and comparative knowledge of the general scope of Forensic Science and a knowledge of how the legal context affects the work of the forensic scientists.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Demonstrate an understanding of the empirical research process.
B2Demonstrate competence in techniques and practices in applying scientific concepts to gather experimental information
B3Show an awareness of ethics in Criminal Justice and Forensic Science.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Make formal and informal presentations on topics relevant to Criminal Justice and Forensic Science by a variety of methods to a range of audiences
C2Use a range of IT applications to obtain and manage information and to gather, process and present information
C3Display the utilisation of a range of information sources in making judgments on matters relating to Criminal Justice and Forensic Science

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Be able to retrieve and evaluate information from a range of sources.
D2Be able to describe and critically interpret research literature.
D3Be able to identify research questions and, with suitable support, devise appropriate strategies of investigation.
D4Demonstrate the ability to comprehend and evaluate a variety of forms of data, including statistical data.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Be able to work in group settings to achieve specified goals.
E2Have the capacity, to undertake self-directed study and show awareness of time-management.
E3Be aware of ethical guidelines and their implications for professional practice and research.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9CHEM09009Forensic Laboratory Techniques20 check mark 
9CRIM09005Penology & Prisons20check mark  
9CRIM09023Policing Communities20check mark  
9CHEM09008Trace Evidence & Microscopy20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9CRIM09021Contemporary Studies in Criminal Justice20check mark  
9CRIM09020Criminal Careers20 check mark 
9CHEM09023Designer Drugs20check mark  
9CRIM09007Youth Justice20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
These are the recommended optional modules. Other optional modules may be taken subject to pre-requisite requirements being met.

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress to L10, students must meet the criteria outlined in University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13 – 3.14).
Those students entering the programme at SCQF level 9, and who successfully achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 9 (including all core modules) can exit with BSc in Criminal Justice and Forensic Science should they choose not to progress to the next level of the programme.
For information on the award of distinction please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.25 – 3.26).
Students who successfully achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 9 (but not including all core modules) can exit with BSc in Combined Studies, see Reg 1.61


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate an extensive and comparative knowledge and understanding of Forensic Science as a whole and its links to related subjects.
A2Demonstrate knowledge of, and evaluate, the trend and effects of crime, harm and victimisation in relation to criminal justice practices.
A3A critical understanding of the established theories, principles and concepts, and of a number of advanced and emerging issues at the forefront of the Forensic Science.
A4Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of appropriate research methods - including qualitative and quantitative - used in support of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science.
A5Demonstrate a critical understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Demonstrate practical skills in related to forensic science including some at the forefront of the subject.
B2Identify and critically assess questions for empirical investigation, formulate appropriate research questions and operationalise constructs accordingly.
B3Display knowledge and awareness of laboratory issues in forensic science including quality assurance, health and safety and record keeping.
B4Have the ability to select, conduct, analyse/evaluate and synthesise a range of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science materials.
B5Use a wide range of the principal professional skills, techniques, practices and materials associated with criminal justice practice.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Show competence in information management skills, especially IT skills including databases and on-line searches
C2Demonstrate the ability to present information to an informed audience.
C3Demonstrate the ability to comprehend and critically evaluate numerical, statistical and other forms of data within the research context.
C4Communicate with professional level peers and subject specialists.
C5Demonstrate competencies in a range of IT skills.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Demonstrate effective information retrieval and handling skills.
D2Demonstrate the ability to describe and critically evaluate research literature.
D3Be able to systematically identify problems and formulate questions for empirical investigation.
D4Demonstrate the ability to critically analyse, evaluate and use data in a variety of forms, including numerical and statistical data
D5Critically identify, define, conceptualise and analyse complex/professional problems and issues.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Be able to work effectively as part of a team and manage interpersonal and contextual factors.
E2Demonstrate the ability to undertake and manage self-directed study to achieve specified goals.
E3Demonstrate the ability to work independently and manage one’s own time.
E4Function as an independent learner capable of adopting a self-reflective approach to learning.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10CHEM10019Criminal Justice and Forensic Science Project40   
10CHEM10010Forensic Biology20 check mark 
10CHEM10008Forensic Evidence20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10CRIM10009Crime as Social Harm20check mark  
10CRIM10005Security in a Global Age20 check mark 
10CRIM10001Victimology20 check mark 
10CRIM10010Working in Criminal Justice20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
These are the recommended optional modules. Other optional modules may be taken subject to pre-requisite requirements being met. When choosing optional modules please note that a minimum of 200 credits Point are required at SCQF Levels 9 and 10, and of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF Level 10 for the award of BSc (Hons) Criminal Justice and Forensic Science

Criteria for Award

The award of BSc (Hons) Criminal Justice and Forensic Science is awarded to students who have at least 480 credits of which a minimum of 200 credits Point are at SCQF Levels 9 and 10, and of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF Level 10.
Honours Classification will be awarded in line with the University Regulations, Chapter 3 (3.20 – 3.24).
Students who have at least 480 credits of which a minimum of 200 Point are at SCQF Levels 9 and 10, and of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF Level 10, but not including all core modules can exit with BSc (Hons) in Combined Studies, see Reg 1.61.


[Top of Page]

Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework.

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.

[Top of Page]



Version Number: 1.05

2014 University of the West of Scotland

University of the West of Scotland is a Registered Scottish Charity.

Charity number SC002520.