University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2020/21

Last modified: 06/05/2020 15:11:29

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Computer Games Technology (Sandwich Avail) Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Computer Games Technology (Sandwich Avail)
BSc  Computer Games Technology (Sandwich Avail)
Dip HE  Computer Games Technology
Cert HE  Computer Games Technology

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:British Computer Society
Maximum Period of Registration:Normally 7 years full time, 8 years full time with sandwich and 11 years part time
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:Paul Keir

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Grades B, B, B, C @ Higher including Mathematics and preferably Physics, Computing or Technological Studies, plus English at least at SQA Standard grade or equivalent. Direct entry to Year 2 with Advanced Higher grades C, C and D including Maths/Computing or evidence of programming.


or GCE

Grades C, C including Mathematics and preferably either Physics, Computing or ICT, plus GCSE English and preferably Physics. Grades B, C, C including Mathematics and preferably either Physics, Computing or ICT will allow direct entry to Year 2.


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

In order to be eligible for admission to year one of the programme, an applicant must have a SQA HNC or BTEC Level 4 HNC in Computer Games Development (with modules in Java/C++/C#/Maths/Object Oriented Programming Unit).

In order to be eligible for admission to year two of the programme, an applicant must have a SQA HNC (Grade A) in Computer Games Development, or an HND in Computing or an HND in Software Development, providing in all cases that C++ (or Java or C#) and Maths have been covered.


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applicants may also be considered with other academic, vocational or professional qualifications deemed to be equivalent.


Further desirable skills pre-application

Knowledge of computer games and the games industry. An interest in programming.


General Overview

The BSc Computer Games Technology programme aims to develop the knowledge and skills of students so that they can play a key technical role in the games industry. As well as covering games-specific issues, the programme also covers software engineering principles and maths/physics principles relevant to the development of modern computer games, including console-based games. The programme has a very practical focus, developing students' skills through courseworks and projects.

The programme has been designed in collaboration with some of the UK's top computer games companies. This approach has been very successful and the programme is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS): fully for Certified Information Technology Professional (CITP); and partially for Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Students enjoy access to the latest hardware and software packages to develop their skills for the games market. A dedicated games studio features a mix of high specification PCs networked to PlayStation® 4 Pro Development Kits, supplied as part of an agreement with Sony Interactive Entertainment, which provide students with practical experience of working with advanced games console architecture and further opportunities for games prototyping. XBox360, PS3, PS Vita and PSP consoles are also available.

UK-based games developers are expected to remain at the centre of this global industry as it continues to expand. Graduates of this course should be well placed to play a role in that expansion. Although the UK already has a significant proportion of the global market in games development, there remains a shortage of people with the relevant technical knowledge and skills to work in the industry. However, the skills developed in this course are also applicable to many other careers within the IT industry and graduates could easily move into programming and systems design.

SANDWICH PLACEMENT (between years 2 and 3, or years 3 and 4)

With the skills and knowledge they have acquired in the first two (or three) years of the programme, students proceed to a paid placement position, of a minimum duration of 36 weeks, in a games company or games-related setting which may be based in the UK or abroad. This provides an opportunity to gain experience as a computer game professional in solving real-world problems and addressing business and organisational requirements. Support in finding a placement, and in the academic supervision of it, is provided by the School’s Placement Officer and the University's Employability Link.

There is some commonality with B.Sc. Computing in the first two years and students may request to transfer to Computing from Computer Games Technology at the end of levels SCQF7 or SCQF8. Transfer to B.Sc. Computer Games Development, a programme aimed at the casual games market, is also possible for those who develop an interest in this alternative career path in the games industry.

Formal face-to-face contact with students is our primary mode of education delivery; via lectures, tutorials and laboratory work. Classes are divided into smaller groups for laboratory work and tutorials. Seminars and group work are used where appropriate. Throughout the programme these provide the opportunity to demonstrate the application of the theoretical concepts presented in the lectures, and for students to practice such application in given scenarios. At levels 9 and 10, in particular, these also provide the forum where assumptions and issues in the theory and its application are explored. The teaching of programming is largely based on practice, where students learn through problem solving, developing algorithms, and writing and testing code to produce working solutions to problems which become more challenging at each level of the programme. Pair programming is used in the early years to build student confidence and to help students become practiced in the continuous critical evaluation of and reflection on the quality of the product as it is being developed. Timetabled programming support sessions, supported by a Moodle site, are provided in term 1 and term 2 and are available to all students on programmes in the School. In addition to the early experience of pair programming, in modules throughout the programme students work in groups, and learn how to manage the team working experience. This includes project management, written and verbal communication, and presenting their work for criticism by their peers and tutors. In the third year of the programme there is a group project to develop a prototype video game, which can represent a substantial piece in the eportfolio of game development work – students have used this project work as the basis for entry into the UK Games Fund's annual Tranzfuser competition. Nearly all modules have either one or two assessment categories. At each level of the programme at least one of the core modules is assessed by an end-of-term formal examination, and sessions on preparing for examinations and managing examination time are provided to all students through the School’s study skills sessions (see Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning). However, the development of analytical and problem solving skills and the application of theory to practice are essential features of the programme and so from the very beginning of the programme there is a high emphasis on in-course assessments. As already noted, in the later years, there are extended pieces of integrative assessed games-development related project work. Modules in which artefacts are developed often ask for a sequence of assessed deliverables, rather than a single overall submission at the end of the module, to allow for formative feedback on earlier implementation phases before later phases are completed. Class tests are widely used to allow feedback on the students’ grasp of concepts and principles in the modules during the term.

The programme also incorporates a blended learning style promoting the objectives of the School’s eLearning strategy. Blended learning is supported by use of the Moodle Virtual Learning Environment. As well as allowing staff to provide resources online for students such as lecture notes, online quizzes etc., Moodle is used extensively to communicate with students: via email e.g. to provide individual feedback for both formative and summative assessment purposes; via discussion boards to supplement tutorials; and via an electronic notice board to convey module administration information. Staff also make use of Moodle to allow students to electronically submit assignments, thus allowing both staff and students to make use of software tools such as Turnitin and MOSS to check for plagiarism. Moodle will also be used as the platform to support Personal Development Planning via the creation and maintenance of an ePortfolio (see Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning below).

Note that the relevant QAA Benchmark statement is the October 2019 Subject Benchmark Statement for Computing.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

Computer Games Technology aims to develop the student’s intellectual and imaginative capabilities, professional understanding and judgement, problem-solving and communications skills, and ability to work as an effective team member. The programme also aligns its modules with the aims of the UWS Graduate Attributes: our students will be Universal, Work-Ready, and Successful. The programme offers a thorough grounding in the principles of computer operation, including programming, and associated engineering approaches and develops the lifelong learning skills that students will need to stay abreast of the rapidly evolving technologies in computing and its related disciplines.

The 3rd year ‘Creative Technologies Professionalism' module is core for this programme. This module covers the development of a number of key transferable skills as well as providing a foundation upon which students will base their future Personal Development Planning (PDP). The support for the PDP elements within this module is also the responsibility or the School’s Personal Tutors (normally the year leader for the programme). Students are scheduled to have PDP meetings with their Personal Tutor each term.

From term 2 of year 1 onwards PDP is embedded in the taught modules of the programme, rather than as a separate subject. Students develop their PDP through module assessments that are intended to contribute to the student’s engagement with personal development planning and the development of skills related to employability in their specialist area.

As students progress through the programme they are typically required to produce reflective and critical evaluation of the work that they have created within an individual or group context. Feedback on this work will be given by teaching staff and supplemented by guidance on the e-portfolio by personal tutors.

PDP and employability skills culminate in the Honours project which gives students the opportunity to display the high level skills they have developed through the programme and to produce an important component of their e-portfolio.

Sandwich Year (either after 2nd year or after 3rd year)

The employability skills and attributes which students will gain experience in developing, applying and reflecting upon during the sandwich placement are correspond to characteristics identified by the SCQF. The SCQF relies on five underpinning characteristics, with SCQF level descriptors expressed in terms of these. The sandwich placement year occurs after either the 2nd or the 3rd year of the programme, and we find the characteristics we aim for align with a subset of those associated with levels 9 and 10 of the published SCQF level descriptors (July 2019).

1) Knowledge and understanding

Demonstrate and/or work with:
• Knowledge that covers and integrates most of the principal areas, features, boundaries, terminology and conventions of the subject/discipline/sector.
• Detailed knowledge and understanding in one or more specialisms, some of which is informed by, or at the forefront of the subject/discipline/sector.

2) Practice: applied knowledge and understanding

Apply knowledge, skills and understanding:
• In using a wide range of the principal professional skills, techniques, practices and/or materials associated with the subject/discipline/sector.
• To practise in a range of professional level contexts that include a degree of unpredictability and/or specialism.

3) Generic cognitive skills

• Critically identify, define, conceptualise and analyse complex/professional problems and issues.
• Demonstrate some originality and creativity in dealing with professional issues • Make judgements where data/information is limited or comes from a range of sources

4) Communication, ICT and numeracy skills

Use a wide range of routine skills and some advanced and specialised skills in support of established practices in the subject/discipline/sector, for example:
• Communicate with peers, senior colleagues and specialists on a professional level.
• Use a range of ICT applications to support and enhance work at this level and adjust features to suit purpose.

5) Autonomy, accountability and working with others

• Exercise autonomy and initiative in professional/equivalent activities.
• Work, under guidance, in a peer relationship with specialist practitioners.
• Work with others to bring about change, development and/or new thinking.

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

A key finding of the Shadbolt Review of Computer Sciences Degree Accreditation and Graduate Employability (2016) is that the type of course that students enrol in matters: those studying sandwich courses enjoy the lowest levels of unemployment (6% sandwich vs 15% non-sandwich), the lowest levels of non-graduate level employment (6% sandwich vs 25% non-sandwich), and graduates from sandwich courses are twice as likely to be earningover £20,000 compared to those who did a standard degree.

The sandwich placement is designed for students to gain and reflect on work experience attained during their time in the workplace. The experience may also contribute towards meeting the membership requirements of a Professional body. Students undertaking a sandwich placement are required to undertake PDP and maintain a portfolio from which they will be required to produce a comprehensive learning log report charting their development during placement. This is assessed on a pass /fail basis only with the majority of ongoing assessment being formative in nature. The student will be required, through reflection, to explore their own role within their placement organisation and to take account of the roles and responsibilities of themselves and others in the context of the structures in which they operate. On successful completion of the placement, the learner will be more employable as a result of having developed their ability to integrate essential generic skills and attributes with subject/discipline related knowledge.

The placement will be governed by a tripartite learning agreement between the student, placement provider and the University which defines the learning outcomes and confirms elements of support and commitment from all parties. The agreement will be signed by each party prior to the start of the placement and it is expected that Schools will continue to use their existing placement systems for the management of such agreements.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the placement the student will be able to:

• L1.Critically relate elements of the placement work experience to the main themes and issues of academic study of [subject discipline] relevant within the workplace and be confident in articulating this to others

• L2. Analyse organisational cultures and structures with particular relevance to the current workplace and exhibit the ability to critically evaluate employee roles in an applied setting.

• L3. Recognise, critically assess and be able to clearly demonstrate to others the personal development and application of essential employability skills and attributes within a real work situation.

Assessment
Assessment will be based on pass/fail only and all assessment elements must be passed for progression as part of the Sandwich programme. Assignments will be open to external examination in accordance with University regulations.
In order to submit for assessment students need to:
• Attend the workplace(s) in which they have been placed for a minimum total of 36 weeks (180 full working days) and have their employer(s) confirm their attendance
• Receive a satisfactory assessment of work performance from their workplace supervisor(s) and academic tutor (based on two interviews and other evidence as required)
• Maintain a PDP portfolio and use this to submit a satisfactory learning log report reflecting on the placement experience (minimum 2,000 words)
• Successfully complete a subject related project (minimum 3,000 words or equivalent)
Where a student’s sandwich placement is made up of two separate planned periods of work experience (i.e. a “Thin Sandwich”), the PDP portfolio report and subject related report will normally be submitted and assessed during the second period of placement. Assessment of the first period of placement will relate to satisfactory performance in the workplace.
Mitigating circumstances will be taken into consideration in accordance with University regulations.

Reassessment
• Minimum period in work: It is essential that the student completes at least 36 weeks (180 working days) in employment. If the student does not meet this minimum requirement then they cannot pass the placement.
• Catch up: Where through no fault of their own a student has been unable to attain at least 36 weeks placement experience they will be entitled to secure the additional work experience required through a suitable additional period of work experience provided this is agreed in advance with the Programme Team.
• Retake of Placement: a repeat or alternative placement will only be considered on health or other mitigating grounds or where the placement is terminated due to no fault of the student. In such cases the student will receive counselling from the placement tutor on how best to proceed.
• Satisfactory Performance: The first interview will be used to assess the student’s progress. If it is considered that the student’s performance is less than expected at that stage, the student will be advised of this and of the elements of their performance that need to improve. If the student’s performance is assessed as unsatisfactory at the second interview then the student will be given further advice on the steps they need to take to achieve a satisfactory assessment and will be reassessed through a third interview at the end of their placement period. Interviews will normally be conducted within the workplace unless a suitable alternative method is agreed by all parties.
• Reflective Report from PDP: If the reflective report is unsatisfactory, the student will be given the opportunity to resubmit in line with University regulations
• Subject related report: If the subject related report is unsatisfactory the student will be given the opportunity to resubmit in line with University regulations

Progression/Award

• Placement students will be assigned to a specific Subject and Programme Panel.

• The relevant Programme Panel will consider the performance of each sandwich placement student enrolled on that Programme and decide eligibility for reassessment, progression and awards in accordance with University Regulations, in particular those relating to Sandwich Awards: i.e. Sections 1.37, 1.38 and 1.39 of the 2019/20 edition.

• A student who fails the sandwich placement after reassessment will no longer be eligible for a “with sandwich” award. They will either progress to level 9 or 10 (as appropriate) of a non-sandwich equivalent programme or exit with an equivalent non-sandwich award.
 

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate an understanding of the computer games industry and the roles and relationships of games developers and publishers.
A2Demonstrate an understanding of design issues in computer games.
A3Demonstrate an understanding of object-based and event-based software development.
A4Demonstrate an understanding of computing as an evolving discipline.
A5Demonstrate understanding of how data is represented and processed on computer systems.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply programming principles and techniques in the development of simple graphical applications.
B2Use a modern program development environment and demonstrate familiarity with the tools it provides to compile, execute, debug and document the software.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use a variety of models and notations to communicate a problem situation and/or its solution.
C2Produce a reflective account of their learning and personal development planning.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Use structured programming as an approach to solving routine computing problems.
D2Evaluate system requirements in a well-understood problem domain.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Work as a member of a pair programming team and take shared responsibility for the deliverables produced.
E2Demonstrate in their work, and be able to give an account of, the responsibilities of computer professionals and their accountability to their clients, the community, and society at large.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7COMP07071The Creative Computing Professional10      
7COMP07028Intro to Games Development20      
7COMP07070Programming with Objects30       Long thin (C++)
7MATH07003Mathematics of Space & Change20      
7COMP07061Computing Systems20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7COMP07010Introduction to Computer Animation20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Standard UWS progression regulations will apply.

Students who achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 7 or above, including the core modules above, will be eligible for the exit award Certificate of Higher Education (Cert HE) Computer Games Technology

Students who achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 7 or above, but do not achieve all the core credits above for the programme, may be eligible for the Certificate of Higher Education (Cert HE) in Information Technology.


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate an intellectual understanding of, and an appreciation for, the central role of algorithms and data structures, and work with a variety of them.
A2Demonstrate understanding of the concepts and principles of the object-oriented paradigm and its use in the context of games programming.
A3Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theory and principles of software models for interactive physical systems.
A4Demonstrate an understanding of the issues affecting performance in rendering 3D graphics.
A5Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the systems comprising a typical games engine.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Make use of a range of object-oriented design principles and of common design patterns to implement a basic games engine.
B2Make effective use of software tools in developing a design model of a computer game.
B3Analyse the extent to which a proposed or existing computer-based application meets the criteria defined for its intended use.
B4Recognise and evaluate the legal, ethical and social dimensions of the games industry.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Develop a design document for a computer game.
C2Simulate real-world physical interactions within game environments by the selection and application of contemporary collison detection and physics algorithms.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Employ algorithmic thinking in developing computing solutions to routine problems, including recursive and distributed possibilities and attention to the benefits and limitations of these.
D2Develop a model of a computer game for the purposes of comprehension, communication, prediction and the understanding of trade-offs.
D3Make informed judgements about graphics hardware and software.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Work as a member of a team, taking account of own and others’ roles, responsibilities and contributions in carrying out and evaluating tasks.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8COMP08035Computer Games Design20       (continuing students)
8COMP08038Real-Time Collision Detection20      
8COMP08091Software Development for Games20      
8COMP08036Real Time Graphics20      
8COMP08087Game Physics20      
8COMP08079Game Engine 120      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Standard UWS progression rules will apply.

Students who achieve 240 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L8 or above, including the core modules above, will be eligible for the exit award Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) in Computer Games Technology.

Students who achieve 240 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L8 or above, but do not achieve all the core modules for the award may be eligible for the Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) in Information Technology.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad and integrated understanding of the scope and main body of knowledge of the computing technologies employed in computer games.
A2Demonstrate an understanding of a range of management techniques used to plan and monitor computer games development projects.
A3Demonstrate a critical understanding of the types of dynamic data structures that can be used to store data and the algorithms to manipulate them.
A4Demonstrate an understanding of advanced principles underlying a 3D graphics engine

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Demonstrate ability to implement advanced graphics techniques using a standard graphics API.
B2Use project management techniques to control and monitor a games development software project.
B3Select and apply theories and techniques of artificial intelligence in implementing a given game intelligence requirement.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use appropriate software tools to support development techniques and project management.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Understand and apply a range of concepts, principles and practices in the context of the design and implementation of 3D games software, exercising judgement in the selection of tools and techniques.
D2Select algorithms appropriate to particular purposes and apply them, recognising the possibility that no suitable algorithm may exist.
D3Make an effective contribution in the design and implementation of a multiplayer computer game.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Recognise and deal with the professional, economic, social, environmental, moral and ethical issues involved in the sustainable exploitation of computer technology, and be guided by the adoption of appropriate professional, ethical and legal practices.
E2Work as a member of a development team recognising the different roles within the team.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9COMP09098Games Technology Group Project40      
9COMP09096Creative Technologies Professionalism10      
9COMP09040Advanced Graphics Programming20      
9COMP09044Algorithms & Collections20       long-thin module
9COMP09041Computer Game AI20      
9COMP09092Research Methods in Computing10      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Either:

BSc Computer Games Technology
or
BSc Computer Games Technology with Sandwich

Standard UWS progression regulations will apply. In particular, students may not progress to the Honours level of the programme until they have met the requirements for BSc award.

Students who have completed 360 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L9 or above, including the core modules above will be eligible for the award Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Computer Games Technology.

Students who achieve 360 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L9 or above, but do not achieve all the core credits for the programme may be eligible for the Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Information Technology.

To be eligible for the award of a sandwich degree, a candidate must have satisfied the requirements for the award of the BSc Computer Games Technology and have accumulated 36 weeks of appropriate industrial placement experience via the COMP00001 module.


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a critical understanding of the ways in which knowledge in computing is advanced, including established methods of enquiry in the discipline
A2Demonstrate a critical understanding of the influence that gaming hardware architectures have on the design of games programs, and knowledge of why and how these novel architectures have developed.
A3Demonstrate a critical understanding of the hardware, software and graphical techniques used in the entertainment industry.
A4Demonstrate a critical understanding of the use of computer games approaches and technologies in non-entertainment applications.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Execute a defined games-related project to produce industry standard software along with design and test documentation.
B2Critically review and assess contributions to the research literature of computing and computer games.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Prepare and deliver comprehensive and critical reports of research studies undertaken in both written and verbal format to an informed audience.
C2Deliver a coherent and reflective presentation of an extended piece of project work.
C3Produce a critical and evaluative written report of a games-related development project.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Use the interface between typical games software application/tools libraries and the underlying hardware in the design and development of code that is tuned to the peculiarities of computer games hardware.
D2Apply modelling concepts in the simulation and control of a variety of systems.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Critically evaluate and review their own work and the work of others.
E2Exercise autonomy and initiative in their project work.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10COMP10034Computing Honours Project40      
10COMP10065GPGPU and Accelerator Programming20       (students who entered at L7)
10COMP10010Serious Games20      
10COMP10037Games Console Development20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10COMP10080Immersive Technologies20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Award

Either:

BSc (Hons) Computer Games Technology
or
BSc (Hons) Computer Games Technology with Sandwich

Students who have completed 480 credits of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF L10 or above, including the core modules as above, will be eligible for the award BSc (Hons) Computer Games Technology.

Students who achieve 480 credits of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF L10 or above, but do not achieve all the core credits for the programme may be eligible for the BSc (Hons) in Information Technology.

To be eligible for the award of a sandwich degree, a candidate must have satisfied the requirements for the award of the BSc (Hons) Computer Games Technology and have accumulated 36 weeks of appropriate industrial placement experience.


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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