University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2021/22

Last modified: 27/08/2020 09:59:41

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Computer Aided Design Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Computer Aided Design
BSc  Computer Aided Design

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:
Maximum Period of Registration:3 years for Full time
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:Dr Parag Vichare

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications


or GCE


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

An appropriate HND award with the level of entry and/or credit awarded being subject to the content of the HN programme in a related discipline.


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applicants may also be considered with other academic, vocational or professional qualifications deemed to be equivalent.


Further desirable skills pre-application


General Overview

Aims and Objectives
(i) Develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills to prepare the student for graduate employment;
(ii) Enable the student to engage in lifelong learning, study and enquiry, and to appreciate the value of education to society;
(iii) Assist the student to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working;
(iv) Develop a critical understanding of fundamental natural laws and their relevance to general design problems;
(v) Develop the ability to apply this understanding (iv), in conjunction with observed information, to the solution of design problems;
(vi) Develop the ability to undertake typical computer aided design, appreciating the variety of design solutions possible
(vii) Develop a critical understanding of, and an ability to apply computer aided engineering design tools to practical engineering problems;
(viii) Develop the ability for group project work and individual project work;
(ix) Develop the ability to communicate clearly and concisely by means of all the currently recognised communication media;
(x)Develop awareness of the procedures used for project and business management;
(xi) Create awareness of the continuing development of mechanical engineering technology and an appreciation of the need for continued study and personal and professional development throughout a career.
(xii) Promote an understanding of the position and responsibilities of designers in society

General Overview of Programme

The current BSc Computer aided Design (BSc CAD) programme is designed as Degree ‘top-up’ at SCQF Level 9 (Year 3) for students with HND in 3D Design; Computer Aided Draughting and Design; Interior Design; Product Design; Mechanical Engineering; Architectural Design; Jewellery Design; or relevant discipline. This gave potential recruits an entry route into the University system and upon successful completion of the programme, allowed them to undertake further study, or to enter the job market. The programme is highly vocational and aims to prepare students for employment.

This degree will put your creative and technical skills to the test to produce digital models, concepts (2D and 3D designs) and specifications for various design and development projects.  It has been developed to meet the needs of industry to enhance your existing qualifications in design, or a related area, to Honours level.

You will use Computer-aided Design, Analysis, Visualisation and Manufacturing packages, Prototyping systems and ancillary equipment in combination with modern communications technologies. You will gain knowledge of the broader spectrum of design and manufacturing systems and the importance of systems integration and will undertake a range of projects in Product / Architectural design. This unique blend of knowledge will provide you with a lot of opportunities in industry across Civil, Structural and Mechanical engineering.

As a graduate, your wide-ranging skills and experience will be sought by employers within the design, engineering, manufacturing, construction, structural, civil, architectural sectors. Roles include Design, CAD/CAM, Manufacturing, Process Planning and Product Design Engineer and Civil/Structural CAD Technician. Graduates from this programme have progressed onto post-graduate study in Computer Aided Mechanical Engineering, Digital Construction Management and Advanced Manufacturing or similar academic streams.

The teaching and learning methods employed by staff in the delivery of the module portfolio covers a wide range of established as well as some novel approaches. Much of this is left to the professionalism of the staff delivering the material with traditional lectures and tutorials still forming the basis for much of the teaching and learning within the School. Extensive use is also made of laboratories, seminars, group work, independent learning and demonstrations. More use is now being made of problem-based learning materials in the teaching environment. One of the main objectives in this area is to keep teaching materials as interesting and as relevant as possible to ensure student enthusiasm for the subjects being presented. Staff make full use of all technologies when delivering materials to students including high quality printed notes, use of multi-media presentations and extensive use of the internet/electronic technology or other appropriate e-learning strategies. The School has a policy of using small tutorial groups in the key subject areas and either sub-divides cohorts into small groups or increases staff numbers in classroom or laboratory environments. All modules are taught by subject experts and for final year students staff make use of materials and topics raised through their professional activities whether research or consultancy based. Many case studies and examples of applications are taken from live industrial situations. The School of Engineering has always taken a lead in the use of IT to either deliver material or to supplement and reinforce the traditional teaching and learning approaches. The School has its own extensive IT Networks (currently running across six server systems) to support all of the activities within the cognate area. These systems are dedicated for the School alone. Students currently have access to 120+ high specification workstations in state of the art laboratories, some of which are air conditioned. Students and staff have personal accounts for the School facilities and students are able to gain 24 hour access to the IT facilities seven days per week. Staff make extensive use the networks to deliver materials electronically. Indeed, many modules are now supported electronically, providing notes, copies of lectures models, videos etc. all through the Schools networks. The standard system for providing a VLE (Virtual Learning Environment) within the University is a system known as Moodle. This is also extensively used by staff from the School of Engineering and Computing. This system is mainly used for the dissemination of materials and information regarding module administration. Students can also contact staff via e-mail or vice-versa. Students are supplied with staff contact details (including e-mail addresses) in the Programme Handbooks. There are examples within the School where staff make use of the VLE to perform additional teaching and learning activities such as on-line tests and assessments. A variety of assessment methods are used throughout the programmes. These range from class tests, laboratory reports, design assessments, individual and group presentations and formal examinations. In first year, assessment is by class test and coursework. This aims to build confidence in the student’s ability to pass modules. Examinations are then introduced from year two onwards. Both group project work and individual project work are incorporated into the curriculum so that students develop the learning skills associated with group and independent working as well as giving presentations on their work. Formative feedback and constructive comments are given to the student on their work. Anonymous marking is undertaken, where possible. Honours projects and group projects are double marked. Mixtures of formative and summative methods are used in the assessment of student performance within the School. It is recognised that while most assessments are summative in nature, demands from students have indicated a desire for more assessment which delivers regular feedback. Where possible, this has been attempted but it is noted that this puts extreme demands on the available time that academics have for marking. There are a number of modules with PDP elements that are integrated within the module content (e.g. Project Management). However there are additional hours and a number of PDP activities that will be scheduled and presented out with the selected modules in accordance with School PDP guidelines. These will be presented, where possible, on the normal days of student attendance or during induction.

Programme Modules will be delivered mainly by an innovative laboratory demonstrations were the practical nature of the module will be emphasised and students will gain experience in using state-of-the-art design software.  During the course of this programme students will develop their UWS Graduate Attributes. Academic Universal and Work-ready attributes: Students will gain knowledge and understanding of this important discipline as well as having the opportunity to develop a broad range of ICT, technical and transferable skills.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

Graduate Attributes

UWS’ Graduate Attributes focus on academic, personal and professional skills and throughout the programmes that these skills develop graduates who are universally prepared, work-ready and successful. The BSc (Hons) Computer Aided Design programme provides opportunities throughout the levels to enable these skills to be developed and focussed appropriately.

BSc (Hons) Computer Aided Design knowledge is assembled throughout the programme and wherever possible digital literacy skills and ability to provide effective solutions is enhanced utilising industry standard appropriate technologies such as CAD, PDM, CAM, CNC machining etc. Most of the undergraduate projects are designed with commercial potential in collaboration with local industry / internal research groups, leading towards long/short term projects and possible employment after graduation.

The programme promotes cultural awareness and emotional intelligence with a variety of group exercises developing resilient, ambitious and enterprising leadership qualities whilst ensuring that group members are emotionally and culturally aware and respectful communication and behaviours are the norm. Commercial awareness is linked to various produc design activities during the programme ensuring that costs associated with staff, materials, manufacture, in-service and decommissioning are considered when developing transformational/innovative solutions with commercial potential.

Ethical awareness and social responsibility is developed throughout and is formalised in final year project studies where School/University ethical approval is sought if required.

Links to current University and programme research are promoted through the programme with opportunities for students to become involved in aspects of the research from the earliest opportunity either discretely or as part of an assessment.

Personal Development Planning

Across the programme of study, the Personal Development Planning (PDP) process gives the opportunity for engagement of students with a set of core activities, which include
• Reflection on prior experience, personal attributes and goals;
• Audits of skills and feedback on their development;
• Opportunities and guidance on the recording of achievements;
• Identification/development of learning goals;
• Opportunities to reflect on this material and to gain feedback;
• Opportunities (and guidance) on presentation of evidence for different audiences and planning of future
• Learning and career development (such as CVs);
• Maintaining an effective PDP record.

The School has set up a group to co-ordinate and improve the effectiveness of the delivery of PDP and students are encouraged to maintain an effective PDP record using e-portfolios.

The employability of engineering graduates is excellent and they are in substantial demand with starting salaries up to £27,000.
 

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

For the purposes of this programme, this equates to the following:

Students are expected to attend all timetabled sessions and to engage with all formative and summative assessment elements of all the modules that are included in the programme specification as core modules as well as any optional module when applicable.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of the essential principals and techniques of product design using Computer Aided Design Methods
A2Demonstrate an understanding of material properties and testing when selected for design/engineering applications
A3Demonstrate an integrated knowledge and understanding of computer aided engineering tools in reverse and conventional modes in engineering product design
A4Develop an in-depth study into an appropriate CAD topic

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use a selection of CAD techniques to model a variety of engineering systems, both static and dynamic
B2Apply reverse engineering principles to a concept design
B3Undertake a risk assessment for a selected engineering procedure or test
B4Undertake the design and testing of a simple engineering component

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Demonstrate the ability to apply rendering and animation techniques to engineering products as a communication aid.
C2Use different computer software to process point data to create a 3D computer model of an engineering artefact
C3Use computer software to develop a rapid prototype to assist in communicating ideas and concepts to potential customers
C4Make formal and informal presentations on aspects of the engineering design process

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Critically analyse a CAD approach to the engineering design process
D2Identify and analyse common problems in the selection and implementation of CAD systems
D3Undertake a comparison between traditional and reverse engineering approaches to component or product design

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Further develop the ability to work independently or as part of a team
E2Prepare, under supervision a risk assessment in line with current industry practice
E3Take responsibility for the work of others in the development of a substantial piece of work.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9ENGG09001Design Prototyping & Testing20 check mark 
9ENGG09018Independent Study20check mark  
9ENGG09051Product design and data management20   
9ENGG09004Project Management20check mark  
9ENGG09025Visualisation Techniques20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9ENGG09011Analysis & Simulation 120   
8ENGG08002Computer Aided Design CAD20   
8ENGG08001Materials & Manufacture20   

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Students obtaining 360 credits of which 100 credits are at SCQF 9 from the above programme, plus 20 credits from another module at either SCQF levels 9 or 10 from the Engineering SDG are eligible for the exit award of BSc in Computer Aided Design.

The award of distinction can be made to a student obtaining a pass degree as stated in the University Regulations.


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate an integrated knowledge and understanding of the principals and techniques of product design and manufacture and testing, using modern CAD/CAM techniques
A2Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concepts of engineering management tools used in design/engineering industry
A3Demonstrate an integrated knowledge and understanding of computer aided engineering tools in reverse and conventional modes in engineering product design
A4Develop a broad understanding of new developments within CAD/CAM

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply a range of CAD methods to the design of engineering components and systems
B2Execute a defined project of research or investigation and identify and implement relevant outcomes
B3Apply advanced methods in CAD

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use a wide range of standard software in the planning, execution and control of the design process
C2Make formal presentations on specialized topics to an informed audience
C3Interpret, use and evaluate a wide range of numerical and graphical data

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Critically identify, define and analyse complex engineering problems using a variety of methods
D2Critically review and consolidate knowledge, skills and practice in a specific area of CAD
D3Make engineering judgements where data/information is limited

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in the study of an advanced CAD topic
E2Practice in ways which show a clear awareness of own and other roles and responsibilities
E3Work with others in the design of an engineering system

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10ENGG10024Computer Aided Manufacture CAM20 check mark 
10ENGG10001Final Year Project40check markcheck mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10ENGG10018Advanced Computer Aided Design20check mark  
9ENGG09006Engineering Management 120   
10ENGG10010Manufacturing Systems Engineering20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Award

To be eligible for the award of BSc Honours degree a candidate must hold 480 credits, including 100 at SCQF 10 from the above programme.
The Classification of Honours will be determined by University Regulatory Framework 3.20-3.24.


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



Version Number: 1.07