University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2022/23

Last modified: 07/07/2022 11:30:01

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Sport Coaching Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Sport Coaching
BSc  Sport Coaching
Dip HE  Sport Science
Cert HE  Sport Science

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:Not Applicable
Maximum Period of Registration:
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Lanarkshire

School:School of Health and Life Sciences
Programme Leader:Dr Daryl Cowan

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

As of academic year 2022-23, this programme is now closed and is no longer accepting students. Please see new programme descriptor for BSc (Hons) Sport Coaching 2022.

Year 1 (Level 7)
108 UCAS Tariff points
Grades: (Higher) ABBC or BBBB or AACC including English, PE, and one Science (Human Biology, Biology, Geography, Psychology, Sociology, Chemistry, Maths, Physics or Modern Studies). Maths must be at standard grade 3 or above, Intermediate 2 or National 4.

Year 2 (Level 8)
136 UCAS Tariff points
Grades: BBC(Advanced Higher) including English, PE and one science subject (Geography, Maths, Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, Modern Studies) plus Maths at Standard Grade 3 or above, Intermediate 2 or National 4.


or GCE

Year 1 (Level 7)
96 UCAS Tariff points
A-LEVEL: CCC including English, PE and one Science subject (Geography, Maths, Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, Modern Studies), plus GCSE grade C or above in Maths.

Year 2 (Level 8)
112 Tariff points
A-LEVEL: BBC including English, PE and one Science subject from Geography, Maths, Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, Modern Studies plus GCSE (Grade C or above) Mathematics.


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Students entering Year 2 (Level 8) with the HNC qualification will have an A in the Graded Unit of Coaching & Developing Sport or Fitness, Health and Exercise, or Sport & Recreation Management. Students who have not achieved Grade A in HNC may be considered for Year 1 entry with B in Graded Unit.

Students entering Year 3 (Level 9) with the HND qualification will have achieved an A in the Graded Unit of Applied Sports Science or Coaching & Developing Sport or Fitness and Health Exercise, or Sport & Recreation Management. Students who have not achieved Grade A in the HND element may be considered for Year 2 entry with the inclusion of Sports Therapy (not eligible for Year 3 entry with this HND).


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Volunteer or work experience in sport, health or exercise or coaching environments, recognised coaching qualifications and awards from National Governing Bodies of Sport.


Further desirable skills pre-application

Applicants may be invited to attend an interview and may be assessed on a piece of academic writing. Year 2 or Year 3 entry may be possible for mature applicants who can demonstrate the following: Level 3, or above, coaching award. A demonstrable history of attending professional development short courses delivered by an NGB, Sports Coach UK or other agency. Significant coaching experience, evidence of having achieved a Community Sport Leaders Award, a recognised National Governing Body Award, or United kingdom Coaching Certificate qualification (UKCC) is preferred. Mature applicants without formal qualifications, who have relevant work experience, may be considered for entry.

Protecting Vulnerable Groups scheme (PVG)
Successful applicants who gain a place on this course will need to register on the PVG Scheme, managed and delivered by Disclosure Scotland. Application will be managed through the University once you have accepted your offer, and further guidance will be provided during induction. There is a fee for joining the scheme and the appropriate fee should be covered by the student. Those students already part of the scheme may apply for an update which incurs a reduced fee. Current fees are available at https://www.mygov.scot/apply-for-pvg


General Overview

The BSc (Hons) Sport Coaching at UWS aims to support current and aspiring coaches to further their career goals by developing their understanding of the pedagogical, practical skills that underpin athlete development. Practical skills are underpinned by multi-disciplinary coaching science (e.g., psychology, sociology, physiology, biomechanics) to ensure students have a holistic, scientific understanding of their role.

The programme is a structured four year full-time programme. Level 7 introduces students to the core areas that inform coaching practice and follows a common structure with the BSc (Hons) Sport Development undergraduate programme. At Level 8 students undertake additional Coaching modules with accompanying science-based modules to develop their understanding of the coaching process. Levels 9 and 10 allow students to specialise in the sciences that underpin coaching and to further understand the broader context of coaching environments.

This degree has been developed to deliver up-to-date practical and professional skills underpinned by appropriate academic theory to produce graduates who are ready for the workplace, or if appropriate, have the skills to further and extend their education in the area of academic research. The philosophy adopted by the programme team has been to produce a degree that follows current best practice, and is cognisant of national and international agendas in sport. The programme has been developed to be vocationally and academically focused, to provide a range of transferable skills. The teaching approach is student-centred with learning taking place in an active, supportive, participatory, and context-specific environment. Students will be given support to develop an autonomous approach to their learning as they progress through the programme, with the balance between independent and directed learning remaining appropriate to the level of study.

A central objective of the programme design is to produce graduates who are ready for the workplace, therefore professional and practical technical skills feature strongly in some modules. The team acknowledges the challenges of providing students with workplace environments and experiences within an academic set-up but believes that with the modules chosen, it will successfully allow students to integrate what they learn at university with what they will experience in industry, be that locally or nationally but with the intention of also providing skills required at international or globally recognised employment outlets.

Students wishing to continue their studies will be able to undertake a range of postgraduate programmes within sport and related subjects such as physical education, sports coaching and sport psychology. Graduates of the programme have gone on to become Active Schools Co-ordinators, Professional coaches, Sport Scientists, Sport Business owners, and teachers.

The School’s overall aim for all its provision is to enable students to develop the graduate skills that will enhance their employability and anticipate the skills needed to support industry. To that end, the approach to curriculum design and development is core to the longer term strategy of the School. It provides a model which is: • Learner focussed • Responsive to a demand-led skills agenda • Fit for developing partnerships within the institution, with industry and the wider HE sector Is based on the following principles: • The student learning experience should be consistent with University policy with respect to equality and diversity and in relation to students with disabilities. • The student learning experience should include e-learning where appropriate. The school is implementing an e-portfolio system for students. • The student learning experience should be designed to meet the needs of each individual student including those from different social and academic backgrounds, cultures, and levels of ability • The student learning experience should be appropriate for developing the specific knowledge, skills, and competences required of each subject area as defined by the learning outcomes of the modules • The degrees should continue to have strong emphasis on employability, PDP, and transferable skills, in line with internal and external benchmarks, policies and initiatives The learning and teaching strategy is designed to help students master the learning outcomes and also to allow them to demonstrate their highest level of competency. Many of the modules contain learning outcomes that are practical in nature. Here students will acquire practical knowledge and understanding through a variety of activities that simulate workplace practices and procedures. This promotes gradually increasing student autonomy and active learning, and supports differing learning styles that allow students to apply both knowledge and practical skills at progressively higher levels throughout the programme. The theoretical aspects of the programme are developed through more traditional lecture and tutorial settings. This approach enables students to engage with theories, concepts and principles in a critical and evaluative way and to develop their own critical, analytical and reflective skills as they progress through the levels of the programme. The aim is to foster in students the range of graduate attributes that will prepare them for their future career and study options, therefore the focus is on developing a broad range of both practical and academic skills.

The programme delivery makes use of a range of teaching and learning methods suggested in the QAA benchmark statement which include: • Tutor-led lectures • Tutorials and seminars • One to one interaction • Practical workshops and exercises in a simulated work environment • Small group teaching and group project work • E-learning (Moodle) • Peer learning through discussion of colleagues work • Independent learning • External work experience (work related/based learning) A range of assessment methods are utilised that are appropriate to the level and subject, and taking into account developments in the Coaching science sector, higher education, and advances in technology. Learning outcomes are assessed by a variety of methods aimed at enhancing the student experience. These methods include, but not inclusively, the following: group and individual work, multiple-choice exams, reflective practice reports, essays, open-book exams, poster presentations, oral presentations, case study deconstruction, programme planning, debate & discussion, reflective learning logbooks, seen question examinations, research production, and journal article reviews. Work assessed through presentations and oral exams will be required to be videotaped in order to allow for both internal and external moderation. Students are expected to undertake independent study both to supplement and consolidate what is being taught in formal classes. Much of the teaching is supported by the Moodle virtual learning environment (VLE) and other online materials developed by staff. The framework provided to students for independent study diminishes as students become increasingly more autonomous in their learning. The assessment strategy is in line with the QAA Subject Benchmark Statement for Sport. This states that assessment must be appropriate to the intended learning processes, the learning context and needs and stages of progression of the students. To ensure these requirements are met, assessment methods on the programme comprise a range of techniques. The assessment spread and type is also important for the student experience and this is reconsidered on an annual basis.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

The ‘I AM UWS’ graduate attributes have been developed to reflect the vision where UWS graduates are work-ready and able to successfully contribute both locally and globally. As part of the programme design and development, the graduate attributes are aligned with all aspects of module and programme delivery.

Employability is embedded and developed throughout the programme to ensure students are work-ready. Students work closely with professional partners from Level 7 to Level 10. Students develop their vocational skills throughout the programme by gaining industry awards and networking within sports organisations. This develops students’ understanding of professional requirements in sport coaching. The knowledge developed through the programme is focussed on the needs of the industry through Skills Active. The skills and attributes acquired by the students are reflective of QAA Subject Benchmark Statements along with the SCQF levels 7-10 qualification descriptors. In addition, the teaching staff, through their affiliations with professional bodies, provide up-to-date information and contacts on the evolving profession of sport coaching.

Core to embedding employability is the formal and informal ways in which the range of the students’ skills and achievements in areas such as data analysis, problem solving and effective communication, as well as self-reflection, decision-making, time management and effective learning and working behaviours are developed across both the academic and practical modules in the programme, all with the emphasis on preparing students for future employment, or indeed, study at a higher level.

There are a range of employment markets for graduate sport coaches, including professional sports clubs, commercial and social enterprises, local authority sports programmes, schools, disability sports clubs, and national governing bodies (NGBs). Roles include academy coach, specialist technical coach, coach educator and coach manager. There is also potential for progression to a career in education or further research (e.g., doctoral studies).

Personal development planning is embedded in all of the BSc Hons) Sport Coaching modules. The process of personal development is implicit in all activities and engagement with students.

There are two distinct themes to PDP; generic aspects are all the skills and abilities students develop in an HE programme and which are transferable to future employments, such as IT skills, and the ability to research, critically appraise and report on information, both in written and oral formats. The ‘planning’ aspect of PDP encourages students to take control of their learning, rather than to be passive consumers of the educational process. Taking control involves making active, informed choices about their path through the Sport Coaching programme. PDP that will maximise the benefit of the programme to a student’s personal and professional development include learning how to prioritise time, how to deal with subject areas that seem particularly difficult, and how to become involved in extracurricular activities that can enhance personal development and employment potential.

PDP is built into module delivery from Levels 7 -10 to ensure that an integrated approach is taken. Support and activities for PDP are incremental, with opportunities for the student to continuously build skills which will contribute to employability and life-long learning. As students progress, activities will be increasingly student centred to enhance autonomy, independence and depth of reflection. Activities will also be aimed at promoting personalisation, responsibility and ownership of teaching, learning and development.

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

The BSc (Hons) Sport Coaching programme offers students the opportunity to take part in work-based learning with specified modules at Levels 7, 8 and 9. These modules offer students the opportunity of relevant work experience placements whereby they can apply their learning and theory in a practical setting. Procedures for work-related learning are based on the QAA Code of Conduct on Placement Learning and the University policy

The credit-bearing modules allow students to choose work-based learning relevant to their areas of interest. All students are provided training by our industry partners in-house at UWS, however students can select their own placement after completion of training. Most students choose to work with our partners.

Students are required to meet the expenses (e.g. travel) relating to the WBL modules.

The Division of Sport and Exercise have a range of branded sports kit available for purchase by students via our provider’s online store. Purchase of such kit is not a mandatory part of the course; however, it is advised that attending placement in branded kit will increase the professional appearance of students whilst representing the university. Any kit purchased is at the personal cost to each student. 

Engagement

In line with the Academic Engagement Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on the relevant learning platform, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Where a programme has Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body requirements these will be listed here:

Students are defined as academically engaged if they consistently attend timetabled teaching sessions (including placements), engage with course-related learning resources including synchronous and asynchronous learning activities and tasks, regularly access VLEs, and complete and submit assessments on time.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy

In line with current legislation (Equality Act, 2010) and the UWS Equality, Diversity, and Human Rights Code, our modules are accessible and inclusive, with reasonable adjustment for different needs where appropriate. Module materials comply with University guidance on inclusive learning and teaching, and specialist assistive equipment, support provision and adjustment to assessment practice will be made in accordance with UWS policy and regulations. Where modules require practical learning or assessment, alternative formats and/or roles will be provided for students with physical disabilities which impact participation.


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1
B2
B3

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1
E2

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Evaluate and compare a variety pedagogical and observational techniques used in a coaching context.
A2Discuss sport policy goals and strategies and methods of achieving these goals.
A3Differentiate various research methodologies and discuss their strengths weaknesses when applied to a number of sport and exercise disciplines.
A4Understand and assess the proposed mechanisms suggested to underpin skill acquisition.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Deliver and evaluate a selection of coaching activities.
B2Undertake the collection and interpretation of routine data.
B3Apply subject-specific knowledge to a work based environment.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Further develop skills in relation to collation of information, interpretation and communication verbally and in written form, complex information using a standard range of applications and procedures (eg. Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Video recording and analysis, Technique Analysis Applications).
C2Develop an appreciation of quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis.
C3Record data accurately and carry out standard manipulation and analyses of data.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake problem identification and formulation of evidence-based solutions.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy for identifying own learning needs.
E2Take responsibility for planning the achievement of identified goals either independently or as part of a group.
E3Prioritise, manage time and work to deadlines.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8SPOR08031Coaching Science 1.30 check mark 
8SPOR08014Integrative Coaching Practice20check mark  
8SPOR08018Policy of Sport20check mark  
8SPOR08020Professional Experience20check markcheck mark SPOR08020 Professional Experience is delivered over two terms as this module is a long, thin placement module.
8SPOR08032Sports Conditioning and Injury 110check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
SPOR08020 Professional Experience is delivered over two terms as this module is a long, thin placement module.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8SPOR08017Physical Activity in Health and Exercise20 check mark 
OR   
any other suitable module from the University catalogue subject to timetabling restrictions, pre-requisite requirements and in agreement with the programme leader   Must be available in T1

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression to SCQF Level 9 is available to students who fulfil the university progression requirements as detailed in line with the Regulatory Framework and will be to the BSc Sport Coaching 2022 programme.

Students who have accrued 240 credit points of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF Level 8 or above, including all core modules, may choose to exit with an award DipHE Sport Coaching.

This is in line with UWS Regulatory Framework.

Distinction is awarded in line with UWS Regulatory Framework.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1
B2

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1
E2
E3

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Critical understanding of contemporary issues in coaching and application of those issues to personal coaching practice.

A2Evaluate the interactions of policy on coaching delivery.
A3Synthesise factors that influence psychology, strength and conditioning or injury.
A4Relate and apply fundamental concepts of sport coaching to complex issues and problems.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Collect, analyse and interpret data from an large independent and context-specific research project.
B2Deconstruct personal coaching performance using reflective practice.
B3Present results to an appropriate audience in a variety of formats including written and oral.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Utilise Skills in an applied context in relation to collation of information, interpretation and communication verbally and in written form using a standard range of applications and procedures (eg. Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Video recording and analysis, Technique Analysis Applications).
C2Design and present produce a poster suitable for an academic conference.
C3Produce an educational video using a variety of motion capture and video production software.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Take an objective and critical approach to problem identification and solution, using evidence-based approaches and own initiative.
D2Critically analyse problems through reference to appropriate sources of information in order to identify detailed mono, multi and interdisciplinary aspects of the conditions of the problem and to develop appropriate solutions.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Take responsibility for planning the achievement of identified goals both on their own and as part of a group.
E2Prioritise, manage time and work to both externally set and self-imposed deadlines.
E3Take responsibility for, and identify own learning needs, develop and apply strategies for further self-development within and out with the programme.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10SPOR10022Contemporary Issues in Coaching Science20check mark  
10SPOR10029Sport Dissertation40check markcheck mark 
10SPOR10031Sports Conditioning and Injury 320check markcheck mark SPOR10031 Sports Conditioning and Injury 3 is delivered over two terms as this module is a long, thin applied module.

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
SPOR10031 Sports Conditioning and Injury 3 is delivered over two terms as this module is a long, thin applied module.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
Students should select two 20-credit options to total 40 credits.    
10SPOR10019Applied Sport Psychology20check mark  
10SPOR10020Biomechanics 220check mark  
10SPOR10027Identifying Injury in Sport and Exercise20 check mark 
9SPOR09058The Psychology of Sport20check mark  Students who have previously studied SPOR09029 Psychology of Sport must not select this module.
OR   
any other suitable module from the University catalogue subject to timetabling restrictions, pre-requisite requirements and in agreement with the programme leader   

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Students should select two 20-credit options to total 40 credits.

Please note: Applied Sport Psychology is only available to students who completed Psychology of Sport in Level 9. Biomechanics 2 is only available to students who completed Biomechanics 1 in Level 9.

Criteria for Award

The award of BSc (Hons) in Sport Coaching is awarded to students who have at least 480 credits, including all core modules, and of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF Level 10.

Criteria for progression/award do not differ from the requirements of the University Regulatory Framework.


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework.

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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