University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2022/23

Last modified: 05/05/2022 13:08:01

Named Award Title:BA (Hons) Community Education Single

Award Title for Each Award: BA (Hons)  Community Education
BA  Community Education
Dip HE  Community Education Studies
Cert HE  Community Education Studies

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:Community Learning and Development Standards Council
Maximum Period of Registration:6 yrs
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Lanarkshire

School:School of Education & Social Sciences
Programme Leader:Dr Annette Coburn

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Highers: BBBC.


or GCE

A Levels: BCC.


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

A relevant HNC with a B in the graded unit and evidence of competence in key areas of community learning and development may be considered for direct entry into level 8 e.g. HNC in Working with Communities, or HNC in Social Care.

Applicants with a relevant HND and practice experience may be considered for direct entry into Level 9 and will routinely be required to submit a practice learning experience portfolio via our UWS Making Experience Count process.

Applicants who do not meet standard admissions criteria but have a minimum of two years of practice experience, verified in a strong personal statement and supporting reference, may be interviewed in via on-line platform or telephone, to assess the suitability of our programme for their level of learning.


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Successful applicants will have experienced community work(eg as a participant, volunteer or paid worker) in, for example, adult, family or community learning, community development and equalities, human rights or social justice, and youth work or work. On commencing their studies,students commit to ethical and respectful practice and have a level of experience that could facilitate joining our Community Learning and Development, Standards Council (CLDSC).

The hybrid nature of learning that blends on-campus with on-line learning using new technologies, such as Teams or Zoom, creates flexibility that can be useful to anyone interested in part-time study. Students who choose to study Part-Time will normally meet the same admissions criteria as full-time student.

Applicants wishing to study on a Part-Time basis should apply directly to the University.

In recognition that applicants who choose to study part-time are likely to already be employed full-time in this disciplinary area, they can claim for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) or credit transfer, (normally as part of an earlier Degree or an assessed portfolio). Claims are made in advance of commencing study. At least 40% of such a claim must offer evidence of contemporary practice learning, via portfolio submission, in order to meet the CLD standard for qualifying programmes.





Further desirable skills pre-application

Applicants will typically have skills in communicating ideas and building relationships. Seeing problems as a means to learning, and working with others can be useful. Experience of voluntary or paid work in community projects, organisations or community contexts, is highly desirable. Candidates who do not demonstrate some of these skills may require a second reverence of be interviewed prior to being offered a place on our programme..

NB An important note on terminology.
The terms Community Education (CEd) and Community Learning and Development (CLD) are used throughout the Programme. The reason for this is that CEd is the core disciplinary area through which CLD is articulated professionally in Scotland.
This dual use of language also recognises a deliberate focus on education as a process for development of deep level knowledge and understanding of the subject area and the emerging professional graduate. This is distinct from learning, which can sometimes be interpreted as the more superficial learning of skills for employment or in relation to a particular competence. While learning in this way is always a part of education, it does not always follow that education (as fostering deep knowledge and understanding) is a part of a learning process. Thus, our CEd Degree prepares students for a career in the core disciplinary area, which is recognised across the world, and is also a qualifying programme within the Scottish CLD context.


General Overview

The overall aim of the BA in Community Education (BACE) programme is to ensure that our students have the best possible learning experience, through which to become qualified and competent CEd/CLD practitioners and managers. The requirement for Community Learning and Development (Scotland) Regulations, 2013 means that all Education Authorities in Scotland must co-ordinate provision for CLD in each of the 32 Local Authority areas. This is a growing professional area in Scotland and in other parts of the world. Our graduates have a valued skillset and understanding of how participatory community education practices can be useful in fostering democracy and citizenship, community wellbeing, and inclusion.

Community Education (CEd) is a distinctive professional practice that historically overlaps with the fields of social work and school education and is also known, in Scotland, as Community Learning and Development (CLD).  Working in specialist areas of community based adult education, community development, and youth work, our graduates are prepared for working in variety of creative and exciting learning environments in Scotland and internationally. A career in Community Education includes working across public and voluntary sectors and involves cross disciplinary working that seeks to enhance learning and promote wellbeing.

As an applied subject, Community Education graduates are prepared for employment that involves working with communities to engage in critical, democratic and social education. Learning about theories, values and practices of Community Education, our students gain knowledge and understanding about community, power, equality and social justice. This knowledge and understanding can be applied in practice to influence change at individual and community level. The programme offers a contemporary hybrid of teaching and learning that incorporates in-class, on-line and practice based study – with 40% of learning achieved in a practice setting.

Grounded in the values and principles of CLD: self-determination, inclusion, empowerment, working collaboratively and promotion of learning as a lifelong activity, this Hons. Degree is also aligned with the QAA subject benchmarks for Youth and Community Work (2019). The programme is also designed with our CLD Standards Council for Scotland guidelines for the professional approval of CLD learning programmes. There are three themes running through the programme:

  • Theme one relates to theory and practice and the importance of critical reflection and research in relation to community education.
  • Theme two relates to the development of emancipatory professional practice in the context of changing cultural, social, political and economic conditions.
  • Theme three relates to the concept of ‘community’ and how this links to new ways of connecting people and the development of social relationships.

Graduates progress into careers in areas such as youth work; community development; human rights or equality work; health and wellbeing; capacity building; community and youth engagement; community cohesion; employability. Practice is applied in contexts as varied as social value in construction, housing; health, or to postgraduate study

Programme Content

Year 1
Students are introduced to key theories and CLD Competences are identified as a foundation for (Personal  and) Professional Development Planning (PDP). Students develop understanding of social theory and power and will be introduced to critical pedagogy. They explore ideas that can be used to enhance competence in groupwork and communication skills. Academic practice is embedded in all modules and students will undertake a practice learning module that is focused on building and maintaining relationships during a practice learning placement of a minimum of 210 HOURS.

Year 2
Students research the core domains of practice and will examine and consider how these can be applied in a range of contexts. They will also undertake a 40 credit practice learning module and placement of a minimum of 290 HOURS focussing on leadership and enaling practices and will consider community activism and positive psychology.

Year 3
Students continue their studies in critical pedagogy and its purpose in creating emancipatory practice. They will develop understanding of the tensions in managing resources and people and will learn about practice based research. A practice learning Module (60 Credits) in trimester will further develop their CLD competences by completing a capstone project within a practice learning placement of a minimum of 364HOURS.

Year 4
In the final year students further develop an emerging professional identity  studying the implications of social policy on CLD practice and will develop a critical understanding of participatory and collaorative practices. They will undertake a research dissertation through professional enquiry linked to a practice learning context (involving 276 HOURS) examining a CLD community of practice.

The degree prepares students for working in a range of professional roles in Community Learning and Development: adult education; community development and community capacity building; culture and community arts; equality work and anti-discriminatory practices; health and well-being; lifelong learning and literacies, social and community regeneration and youth work. Graduates can expect to gain employment in statutory and voluntary sectors at practitioner and management levels. The degree offers a grounding that is relevant in a range of contexts for example, in national agencies, international charities, or in responding to global concerns via community action or campaigns.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

On completion of this degree you will have accumulated a range of knowledge, skills and understanding that prepares you for employment in a range of ever changing contexts, in Scotland or in other parts of the world. You will have a set of graduate attributes that strengthen your resilience and capacity to succeed (see https://www.uws.ac.uk/current-students/your-graduate-attributes/ for more information on the full range of attributes that mean you will be proud to say ‘I am UWS’) Specifically, in your Community Education degree, you will develop skills and attributes in a range of ways:

Academic Attributes – are obviously in your reading enough to produce an argument in academic essays or other assignments. However academic attributes are also about your development of critical thinking, resolving problems and being inquisitive. Examples of this include participation in live debates, utilising a range of digital meeting in learning, teaching and assessment, and undertaking a critical review of policy and practice

Personal Development Planning (PDP)– is embedded in every module and involves specific aspects of learning towards emotional and cultural awareness of yourself, understanding the communities that you work alongside, and in developing creative and imaginative assessments (including the invention of a board games, poster presentations, short films and website development).

Professional Development – is about the aptitudes and values of the emerging professional that you are becoming. It is achieved through teaching, learning and assessment across all modules and includes activity such as practice learning placements. For example, you will develop potential for leadership in Yr2 taking a leading role is part of your placement, and in Yr3, undertaking a ‘capstone project’ will demonstrate professional competence and prepare you to be fully ready for your role as a community educator.

Our UWS attributes are aligned to the growth of a professional learning culture within Community Education and CLD in Scotland. Driven by the CLD Standards Council for Scotland,  i-develop offers a web-based continuing professional development platform that supports creative and innovative learning with increased use of coaching, mentoring and enhanced skills in self-reflection to support continuity in practitioner learning.

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

Community Education Practice Learning is a key element of this Degree. The CLDSCS guidelines for the approval of courses, requires that 40-50% of the learning within all qualifying courses should be practice based. Students can engage in practice learning through their work if it is a relevant area, through dedicated placements and through activities related to practice including participatory research.

Where students are currently employed in CLD the practice learning experience at either level 8 or 9 will be in a different area of practice from their area of employment in order to ensure breadth of learning across the three domains of CLD.  The student will negotiate and secure placement offers across a range of CLD practice to facilitate creation of appropriate community practice learning placements. The final decision on where the student will undertake practice learning and the main focus of their learning involves the student, their personal university tutor and placement co-ordinator.  

In year one, the CEdPL module gives 20 credits, in year two this is raised to 40 credits and in year three, to 60 credits.  In third and fourth year, CEdPL is also embedded in a capstone project and the Hons dissertation. During year three a required 80 hours of CEdPL relates to a research pilot and in year four, 276 hours of CEdPL is linked to dissertation. 

The terms ‘Community Education Practice Learning’ or ‘CEdPL’ are used to include work-based related and placement learning. In accordance with Chapter 1 of the University Regulatory Framework (Chapter 1: Sections 1.68 – 1.79), practice learning experiences fall into two categories – placement learning and work-based learning.

Practice placement learning – Full-time students who do not have relevant employment will normally be placed by the University within an organisation for a defined period in each year of the programme. The placement experience  enables students to meet specific learning outcomes and a placement learning agreement is drawn up for each student, within each placement to clarify the specific responsibilities accepted by the student, provider and the University (see Practice Learning Handbook and associated forms).

Work-based learning – It is anticipated that part-time and some full-time students will be employed within an organisation that provides a relevant placement experience which will enable them to achieve the required learning outcomes within their own workplace. However, a placement learning agreement is still required for each student, within each placement in order to clarify the specific responsibilities of the student, provider/employer. This agreement must be accepted by the practice learning placement co-ordinator, to ensure that the student has access to a relevant range of experiences and that required supports are in place. Students who are employees will negotiate with employers to facilitate a placement experience that offers learning and challenge outwith their normal working practices.

This may be essential if the workplace does not provide sufficient, relevant experience for the student to demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes. The following are essential elements of the practice learning agreements:

• Each student within each placement will have an identified practice tutor.
• The practice tutor’s role will be clearly outlined.
• Guidelines will clearly outline the role expectations and responsibilities of the student, provider/employer, University and practice tutor.
• The nature and purpose of the experience and relevant learning opportunities will be clearly defined.
• Expected achievements and limitations of participation by students will be clearly identified.
• The process of achievement and assessment of learning outcomes and standards will be clearly identified.
• Responsibility for achievement and assessment of the required standards will be clearly identified
• Channels of communication between the student, practice tutor, placement provider/employer and the University will be clearly identified.

Assessment of CEdPL is by production of an e-portfolio or equivalent. In year 3 this incorporates a capstone project and pilot research activity in a practice setting; In year 4 the portfolio includes evidence of research data gathering that is applicable in a youth and community context.

Engagement

In line with the Academic Engagement Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on the relevant learning platform, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Where a programme has Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body requirements these will be listed here:

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on AULA/Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time. For the purposes of this programme, academic engagement equates to the following:

Full engagement in your studies is essential to maximise your UWS experience in working towards your BA (Hons) Community Education you are required to participate in all aspects of the programme and are expected to spend approximately 200 hours of study effort for each module. This means that simply attending classes each week is not enough to succeed in your studies.

So, in addition to participating in classes on campus, you will also work on your own or with others through the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) or other on-line environment, to complete activities on and off of campus task. You will also engage in and reflect on practice learning and will make time to read, think and write on most days (not only during term time). This will help you to understand new ideas, to challenge and change your existing views, and to successfully complete assessments.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy

Community Education is an emancipatory practice that works with communities to challenge inequality and promote social justice. Thus, a commitment to equality and accepting difference underpins curriculum, content and process, across the Programme. It is therefore not surprising that our values and ethos adhere to, and go beyond, the minimum legal position as detailed within the Equality Act 2010, in requiring compliance with the general equality duty to:

•Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by the Act;

•Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not; and

•Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

The programme supports equality of opportunity for students from different backgrounds and with different learning needs. Using appropriate platforms, learning materials are presented in formats that facilitate flexible access and with all reasonable adjustments being made to ensure fair and inclusive engagement. The programme complies with University regulations and guidance on inclusive learning and teaching practice. Specialist assistive equipment, support provision and adjustment to assessment practice will be made in accordance with UWS policy and regulations.


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of community practices in CLD and their historical development.
A2Can articulate knowledge of the values, principles and purposes of CLD and its relationship to critical pedagogy and power.
A3Demonstrate awareness of the roles and responsibilities associated with becoming a participatory and emancipatory community practitioner as conceptualised in the identity of a reflective practitioner.
A4Demonstrate an understanding of the difference between explanations based on research and other forms of explanation and the importance of this difference.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Show understanding and capacity to apply and integrate theoretical frameworks and key concepts relevant to learner-centred, participatory practice in youth and community work.
B2Acquire informed and critical understanding of their professional role as empowering community educators in relation to other professional youth and community practices.
B3The ability to build trusting, empowering and participatory relationships as a foundation for learning.
B4Develop ability in the application of basic, routine and dynamic values, principles, purposes and processes of participatory and emancipatory practice.
B5Facilitate informal learning, community participation and agency using groupwork and a range of interpersonal skills.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Present and evaluate arguments, information and ideas in relation to the theory and practice of community education.
C2Access online materials and participate in online learning activities.
C3Make effective use of literature search systems and be aware of their strengths and limitations.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Present and evaluate opinions and arguments in speech and writing using relevant specialist vocabulary.
D2Demonstrate an understanding of their own approaches to learning.
D3Demonstrate self management, including the organisation of an efficient and effective work pattern, and working to deadlines.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise some initiative and independence in carrying out defined activities at a professional level in a community work context.
E2Participate in less familiar areas of youth, adult and community work.
E3Promote experiential learning and reflection in self and others.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7BACE07002C Ed Practice Learning 120check markcheck markcheck mark
7BACE07003Critical Pedagogy One20check markcheck markcheck mark
7BACE07004Group Work and Communication20check markcheck markcheck mark
7BACE07005Power in Communities20check markcheck markcheck mark
7BACE07001Social and Political Ideologies20check markcheck markcheck mark
7BACE07006Understanding Communities20check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Core modules will be specifically timetabled each year for full-time students, but are available across all three Terms for part-time students who have a negotiated timetable.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Students who meet criteria for progression, as detailed in the University Regulations, Chapter 3, Sections 3.13 – 3.14, will progress to level 8. On completion of these modules students can exit with a Certificate of Higher Education in Community Education Studies if they meet the requirements of Chapter 3, Section 3.15 – 3.16

Distinction for anyone exiting at this level will be calculated in line UWS Regulations,Chapter 3, Sections 3.20 - 3.26


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the scope, defining features, and main areas of participatory youth and community work.
A2Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the three domains of CLD and the theoretical implications associated with a community of practice.
A3Demonstrate and work with a limited range of theories of change in regard to critical pedagogy and a participative, learner-centred curriculum in community contexts.
A4Develop knowledge and understanding of community inquiry and research practices and how these inform agency, participation and social change.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use a range of skills, techniques and practices, both conventional and innovative, to demonstrate autonomy in the planning, delivery and evaluation of participatory educational programmes across a range of practice settings.
B2Operate as a reflective and empowering practitioner, demonstrating appropriate professional actions and behaviours.
B3Foster participation and support for young people and adults in playing an active role in their communities, increasing their voice and influence in contexts and on issues that affect them.
B4Develop skills in facilitating inclusive strategies for participation in community-led activities, collaborations and partnerships.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use a range of standard applications to collect and apply narrative, numerical and creative data, as appropriate.
C2Convey complex data in different formats, including graphical and tabular to a range of audiences.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues in relation to community contexts and opportunities for social democratic and participatory practice.
D2Use a range of approaches to formulate evidence based responses to defined problems or issues related to domains of practice in CEd/CLD.
D3Critically evaluate evidence based and resilient responses to defined problems.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise skill and autonomy in reflection on different value systems, including their own, and be able to explore participatory values in informal community education contexts.
E2Manage resources with in defined areas of work.
E3Take the lead in planning in familiar or defined contexts.
E4Deal with ethical and professional issues in accordance with ethical codes of practice.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8BACE08001Activism In Communities20check markcheck markcheck mark
8BACE08003C Ed Practice Learning 240check markcheck markcheck mark
8BACE08002Community Arts and Media20check markcheck markcheck mark
8BACE08004Domains of Community Education Practice20check markcheck markcheck mark
8BACE08005Positivity in Community Work20check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Core modules will be specifically timetabled each year for full-time students, but are available across all three Terms for part-time students who have a negotiated timetable.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Students who meet criteria as detailed in the University Regulations, Chapter 3, Sections 3.13 – 3.14 will progress to level 9. On completion of these modules students can exit with a Diploma Higher Education in Community Education Studies if they meet the requirements of Chapter 3, Section 3.15 – 3.16

Distinction for anyone exiting at this level will be calculated in line UWS Regulations,Chapter 3, Sections 3.20 - 3.26


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Critique a broad and integrated knowledge and understanding of the scope, main areas and boundaries of youth and community work.
A2Demonstrate a originality and creativity in taking a critical approach to youth and community work, reflecting on the two way relationship between theory and practice.
A3Apply knowledge of critical pedagogy in developing and managing youth and community work contexts.
A4Interpret a range of social issues that affect youth and community and exercise informed judgement in relation to them.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Practice in a range of professional level contexts and be prepared to question and deconstruct taken-for-granted and common-sense professional understandings.
B2Practice routine methods of enquiry to conduct, record and evaluate the impact of democratic, participatory practice in the context of up-to-date knowledge.
B3Practice ethically, recognising the complex, contested and essential nature of ethical practice in developing and managing youth and community work.
B4Develop capacity to manage others in the workplace, manage complex accountabilities, including being able to compromise and negotiate without losing integrity and professional principles.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Make formal and informal presentations on debates at the forefront of the discipline.
C2Use a range of IT applications to support and enhance work.
C3Interpret, use and evaluate numerical and graphical data to record and reflect on practice interventions.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis and evaluation of current debates on key concepts and contested issues.
D2Draw on a range of sources in making judgement.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Take responsibility and exhibit insight and confidence in managing themselves and draw on conscious use of self in working with others and in leading or participating in teams.
E2Identify discrimination and unjustified oppression and be strategic in developing inclusive, liberating and participatory interventions to tackle these in different situations.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9BACE09001Applied Critical Pedagogy20check markcheck markcheck mark
9BACE09002C Ed Practice Learning 360check markcheck markcheck mark
9BACE09003Community Practice Research20check markcheck markcheck mark
9BACE09004Managing People and Practice20check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Core modules will be specifically timetabled each year for full-time students, but are available across all three Terms for part-time students who have a negotiated timetable.


Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Students who meet criteria as detailed in the University Regulations, Chapter 3, Sections 3.13 – 3.14 will progress to level 10. On completion of these modules students can exit with a BA in Community Education if they meet the requirements of Chapter 3, Section 3.15 – 3.16

N. B. Students wishing to exit at Level 9 with the award of an ordinary BA degree, will need to ensure that they have met the 40% placement hours requirement before graduating. See placement and programme handbook for details on how this can be achieved. Distinction for anyone exiting at this level will be calculated in line UWS Regulations,Chapter 3, Sections 3.20 - 3.26


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate and work with knowledge that covers and integrates most of the principle areas, features, boundaries, terminology and conventions of critical and participative youth and community work.
A2Synthesise a critical understanding of the principle theories, concepts and principles of participative youth and community work.
A3Question and critique knowledge and understanding in one or more specialisms in the discipline.
A4Demonstrate and work with knowledge and understanding of the ways in which the discipline is developed, including a range of established techniques of enquiry.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use some skills, practices and materials which are advanced and at the forefront of the discipline.
B2Execute a defined project of research using a professional enquiry approach and demonstrate capability to implement relevant outcomes.
B3Practice in a range of professional level contexts which include a degree of specialism and fine-tuned inter-professional skills.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Make formal presentations about specialised topics to informed audiences.
C2Communicate with professional level peers, senior colleagues and specialists.
C3Use a range of software to support and enhance work at this level.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Critically identify, define conceptualise and analyse complex professional level problems and issues.
D2Offer professional level insights, interpretations and solutions to problems and issues.
D3Critically review and consolidate knowledge, skills, practices and thinking in youth and community work.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Take significant responsibility for the work of others and for a range of resources.
E2Practice in ways which show a clear awareness of own and others' roles and responsibilities and opportunities for participation in collaboative and inter-professional practice.
E3Work with others to bring about change, development and new thinking.
E4Deal with complex ethical and professional issues in accordance with youth and community work ethics.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10BACE10002Activating Collaborative Practices20check markcheck markcheck mark
10BACE10001Advanced Policy and Community Practices20check markcheck markcheck mark
10BACE10006CEd Practice Research Dissertation60check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Core modules will be specifically timetabled each year for full-time students, but are available across all three Trimesters for part-time students who have a negotiated timetable.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10BACE10003Community Based Adult Education20check markcheck markcheck mark
10BACE10004Community Development20check markcheck markcheck mark
10BACE10005Youth Work Specialism20check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Option modules will be specifically timetabled each year for full-time students, but are available across all three Terms for part-time students who have a negotiated timetable.

Criteria for Award

Students who meet criteria as detailed in the University Regulations, Chapter 3, Sections 3.13 - 3.16 and thus, have successfully completed these modules will be Awarded a BA Hons in Community Education. The Hons classification will be calculated in line UWS Regulations,Chapter 3, Sections 3.20 - 3.26


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework.

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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