University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2022/23

Last modified: 21/07/2022 14:38:18

Named Award Title:BA (Hons) Criminal Justice (Policing) Single

Award Title for Each Award: BA (Hons)  Criminal Justice (Policing)
BA  Criminal Justice (Policing)
Dip HE  Criminal Justice
Cert HE  Criminal Justice

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:
Maximum Period of Registration:
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Education & Social Sciences
Programme Leader:Heather Myles

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

SQA Highers
Standard Entry (UCAS Tariff 114 pts) ABBB

Adjusted Entry (UCAS Tariff 108 pts) BBBB

A Levels (UCAS Tariff 112 pts)
Standard: BBC
Adjusted: BCC

SWAP (BBB):
Access to Humanities; Access to Social Sciences


or GCE

To Year 1/Level 7:
GCE A-Level - BCC; OR 104 UCAS Tariff Points


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Year 1: HNC B in GU
Social Sciences (with sufficient CJ content)
Legal Services (with sufficient CJ content)

Year 1 HND: Social Sciences; Legal Services B in GU.

Year 2: HNC with B in GU:

Social Sciences (need to have at least some research methods, and have taken either one criminal justice/criminology/Scottish criminal law module)

Year 2: HND B in GU

Social Sciences (with sufficient CJ content)


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Irish leaving Certificate: H1, H2, H2, H2

IB: 27P


Further desirable skills pre-application


General Overview

The Criminal Justice programme offers an opportunity to study criminological theory, research and policy alongside a strong emphasis on process and institutions. It develops a comparative knowledge and understanding of Criminal Justice with attention to Scotland, the United Kingdom, Europe, and beyond, including the global south. It is a four-year, full-time programme and involves the study of concepts, theories, structures, organisations, processes and practices involved with the prevention, investigation and prosecution of crime, the workings of the criminal law and criminal court system and the treatment of people with convictions. It is based on progressive levels of study, and at Level 7 and Level 8 introduces students through research-led teaching by staff in Criminal Justice, to the key concepts and theories in criminology and criminal justice.  For example, at Level 7 students will study the differences between deviant and criminal behaviour, the foundations of criminal law, and the way in which the criminal justice system operates; and at Level 8 the theoretical underpinnings for understanding crime and justice, the nature of policing, and contemporary theoretical perspectives on crime such as gender, power, race and class.  Additionally, students are taught core research methods at Levels 7, 8, and 9 where students will have the opportunity to meet and collaborate with students enrolled on other social science related programmes within the School.  At Levels 9 and 10 there are a range of modules that allow students to develop their own specialised areas that draw from and reflect staff’s research interests in Penology, Policing, Youth Justice, Gangs, Working in Criminal Justice, Global Security, Victimology and Comparative Criminal Justice.

Students have the opportunity to apply during level 8 of their studies to specialise at level 9 by taking the Criminal Justice (Policing) specialism which entails students taking the Policing Communities and Crime Investigation modules at Level 9, and completing a policing related dissertation in level 10. This is a specialism that accepts a limited number of students, and information relating to how to secure a place on the pathway is discussed with the level 8 cohort each year. At the end of the degree, student who successfully complete all of the policing modules will exit with either a BA Criminal Justice (Policing) or BA (Hons) Criminal Justice (Policing) award.  

All students are assigned a personal tutor who can support and provide advice throughout the period of study related to personal, pastoral or academic issues.  The programme also provides opportunities for students to study abroad through established Erasmus partnerships in Malta and Slovenia (subject to Erasmus continuing). There are further opportunities for experiential learning with the offer a biennial field trip to one of three Universities in the United States of America on a rotational basis. 

Overall, the design of the Criminal Justice programme seeks to provide students with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the nature of crime, criminal justice and criminal justice systems, locally, nationally and globally, and with a range of key transferrable critical, analytical and evaluative skills.

Progression Routes and/or Further Study

Criminal Justice students have the potential to enter employment in a variety of contexts including: youth justice, the police, as police officers, as part of the 'civilian' support staff, or as part of the office of the Police Investigation and Review Commissioner; the Prison Service; the Criminal Courts Administration and/or the Fiscal service; Local Authorities where jobs that are specifically related to criminal justice are a further potential graduate destination with growing opportunities in areas such as restorative justice; Community Justice related opportunities exist in areas including community safety and working with people with convictions, victims and witnesses; the Scottish Justice Department; and numerous youth/criminal justice services such as SACRO, Young Scot and Youth Link.

Relating to further study, Criminal Justice students have in the past gone on to take postgraduate studies in Criminology, Law, Applied Social Sciences, Social Work, Policy Analysis, Global Security, Teaching, and other related disciplines. For those students interested in pursuing an academic career path, an achieved honours classification of 2:1 and above would normally make a student eligible to pursue postgraduate study either at UWS or elsewhere. 

  Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategies

The learning, teaching and assessment framework is aligned with the University’s Strategic Plan and with AdvanceHE’s (formerly HEA) Framework, to develop an assessment strategy that promotes learning and is fit for purpose, that embraces effective feed forward and feedback practices that are innovative and promote excellent teaching and learning experiences. For example, in addition to the ERASMUS programme there shorter opportunities to study abroad through the earlier noted field trips.  Furthermore links exist to support students in undertaking applied/work-related learning opportunities as part of their undergraduate studies, including through our level 10 'Working in Criminal Justice' module where students combine criminal justice work or volunteering with their academic studies. There are a range of learning and teaching methodologies including inquiry-based and blended learning to support students in becoming autonomous learners through the development of independent learning skills.

Teaching is research-led with all members of staff have experience of working and publishing in the field of Criminal Justice. Research active staff have worked with a diverse range of agencies on a number of projects including topics such as institutional and school violence, community policing, reducing reoffending, public protection, youth gangs and organised crime, issues affecting refugees, support for former armed forces personnel, international crimes such as genocide and terrorism.  A number of agencies linked with these areas of research also provide support through guest lectures and/or support for student research projects. The knowledge gained from this external engagement and practice are embedded in curriculum.

Our assessments vary in form - formative and summative - and include essays, seminar presentations, poster presentations, short answer questions, case studies, on-line assessments, critical article reviews, and mock practical exercises such as mooting / mock trials and replication of a children’s panel.  The programme offers a variety of assessments in order to encourage student learning and development and provide students with a range of transferrable skills and competencies.  Pedagogical philosophy underpins the programme’s learning, teaching and assessment strategy by:

  • Providing a diverse range of learning and assessment options
  • Providing the opportunity for students to develop a range of communication styles and skills - oral and written
  • Embedding both formative and summative forms of assessment
  • Providing opportunities for students to develop digital literacies
  • Supporting student collaborations - internally and externally - to develop critical thinking, independent learning, and bridge the gap between acquired academic knowledge and applying it to contemporary Criminal Justice issues
  • Encouraging reflection on key graduate attributes/transferable skills
  • Facilitating awareness of the complex and contested ethical issues in Criminal Justice

Consequently the degree programme utilises a number of learning and teaching methods including lectures, seminars, group work, and workshops. It encourages students to become independent and autonomous learners throughout their degree programme and at Level 10 the Dissertation module provides the opportunity for an extended period of independent study.

All modules have their own Moodle or Aula  (virtual learning environment) sites which support students with a range of learning resources, including discussion boards, on-line tests, and where appropriate video-clips. 

The BA (Hons) Criminal Justice programme board, divisional board, and the school of Education and Social Sciences annual monitoring process evaluate all of the learning and teaching practices adopted by the programme, for example through the module evaluation process, with alterations and improvements made every year.

 


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

The programme is fully aligned with institutional priorities around the development of graduate attributes and with the institutional policy on personal development planning. The mapping of programme and module learning outcomes and employability-integrated assessment ensures the visibility of graduate attributes, employability and citizenship competencies. Personal development is embedded and explicitly signposted in the curriculum, with students provided with regular opportunities to capture and evaluate progression and development, stimulating reflection, self-regulation and a more constructive engagement with employability. It is recognised that personal development planning is an essential component of lifelong learning and continuing and professional development. To support this activity, all students are provided with access to personal development planning tools and enabled to develop a personal e-portfolio across the programme.

Within the School of Education and Social Sciences, there is a focus on embedding employability skills and personal development planning in delivered modules. In particular this is carried out within the core research methods modules through their applied nature, the optional level 10 module 'working in criminal justice' and the level 10 Dissertation which encourages the development of key independent learning and employability skills.

On the BA (Hons) Criminal Justice programme, learning outcomes and the design of assessment strategies ensure that, in addition to the development of academic subject-based knowledge, students also develop key personal transferable skills that will enhance their employability.  Encouragement is given to students to reflect upon their own learning and/or achievement and to engage in planning for their personal education and career development throughout their studies.  As part of the University’s commitment to the development of PDP, Personal Tutors support students in developing self-awareness of the key skills and knowledge that are acquired in the course of learning, and in becoming effective, independent and self-directed learners.

A range of electronic tools provide the opportunity for students to record and showcase their academic and personal achievements in developing their curriculum vitae.

The BA (Hons) Criminal Justice Programme maps fully on to the ‘I am UWS’ strategy. This institution-wide strategy ensures that students, upon completing their studies will be Universal, Work-ready, and Successful in an academic, personal, and professional sense. The full ‘I am UWS’ graduate map for the programme can be found on the BA (Hons) Criminal Justice programme Moodle site which all students of the programme have access to.

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

We have a number of partnerships, and several members of the team have excellent working relationships, with institutions in Europe, USA and elsewhere. Our international strategy is in line with the university’s ambitions as laid out in the Global Reach Enabling Plan. 

We are also actively engaged with external organisations such as SACRO, Victim Support Scotland, Community Services Glasgow, SPS and Police Scotland to deliver work-related opportunities for students, in line with the University’s Education Enabling Plan, AdvanceHE's (formerly the HEA’s) strategies for Embedding Employability, and Student Engagement through Partnerships. We further seek to develop volunteer opportunities or to gain applied work-related learning experience as part of their degree studies through modules such as the leve 10 'work related learning module'. Further to this, the Level 10 Dissertation Module is designed to permit students to consider undertaking an applied research project with/for an external agency if planned and permission given by the organisation in question. This is especially the case for those students registered on the policing specialism at level 10, as they will conduct research related to policing and may have the opportunity to carry out a project agreed with a single point of contact at Police Scotland.

There are existing outward mobility field trips faciliated on the BA (Hons) Criminal Justice programme. First there is the biennial two-week exchange programme for our level 9 students with three USA based Universities (on a rotational basis); Washburn University in Kansas, the University of West Florida and Florida Atlantic University.  In addition, for credit bearing outward mobility students can (Erasmus scheme continuing post UK / EU withdrawal dependent) spend a semester at one of our Erasmus partner institutions including the University of Malta, Maribor University - Slovenia, Laurea University - Finland and the University of Salamanca - Spain.  It is important to note also that work related learning and skills development are embedded within a large number of modules on the BA (Hons) Criminal Justice programme and associated Policing specialism as previously noted.

 

Engagement

In line with the Academic Engagement Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on the relevant learning platform, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Where a programme has Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body requirements these will be listed here:

All full time students (part-time and distant learning students should check with their programme leader for any queries) are required to attend all scheduled classes and participate with all delivered elements of the module as part of their engagement with their programme of study. Consideration will be given to students who have protection under the appropriate equality law. Please refer to UWS Regulations, Chapter 1, 1.64 – 1.67, available at the following link: http://www.uws.ac.uk/current-students/rights-and-regulations/regulatory-framework/

Please note that some individual modules may have specific engagement and attendance requirements that deviate from the standard approach, and all students should familiarise themselves of the requirements for each module they enrol on through module descriptors, module handbooks, and module VLE sites.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy

Aligned with the overall commitment to equality and diversity stated in the Programme Specifications, the module supports equality of opportunity for students from all backgrounds and with different learning needs. Using Moodle, learning materials will be presented electronically in formats that allow flexible access and manipulation of content (part-time and distant learning students should check with their programme leader for any queries). The module complies with University regulations and guidance on inclusive learning and teaching practice. Specialist assistive equipment, support provision and adjustment to assessment practice will be made in accordance with UWS policy and regulations. The University’s Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Policy can be accessed at the following link: http://www.uws.ac.uk/equality/

Our partners are fully committed to the principles and practice of inclusiveness and our modules are designed to be accessible to all. Where this module is delivered overseas, local equivalent support for students and appropriate legislation applies.


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad understanding of the nature of criminal justice.
A2Demonstrate a range of knowledge of basic theories, concepts and principles of criminology and criminal justice.
A3Demonstrate knowledge of the historical developments of the main institutions of criminal justice and their organisation.
A4Demonstrate an awareness of the difference between explanations based on evidence and/or research and other forms of explanation on the developing nature of criminology and criminal justice.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply knowledge and understanding of criminal justice to selected real world issues.
B2Begin to understand and acquire the conventions of appropriate academic discourse and communication.
B3Distinguish criminal justice knowledge based on evidence and/or research from other forms of explanation, e.g. anecdotal

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Explain basic criminal justice concepts and ideas in a coherent form.
C2Use oral and written forms of communication effectively in both formal and informal contexts.
C3Use appropriate applications, including available virtual learning environments (VLE) and the Internet, to access a variety of sources.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Evaluate arguments, information and ideas which form the basis of criminal justice knowledge
D2Reflect on the appropriateness and validity of developed arguments.
D3Consider contemporary real world issues from a criminal justice perspective.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Be able to engage in and demonstrate a capacity for independent study.
E2Identify and recognise the importance of self-management of their own learning.
E3Collaborate effectively with others in shared tasks to achieve a common goal.
E4Take responsibility for agreed elements of group tasks.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7APPD07001ASPIRE20check markcheck mark 
7SOCY07020Introduction to Social Research20check markcheck mark 
7CRIM07005Criminal Behaviour & Deviance20check mark  
7CRIM07002Scottish Criminal Justice20check mark  
7CRIM07001History of Crime & Justice20 check mark 
7CRIM07004Scottish Criminal Law20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress to L8, students must meet the criteria outlined in University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13).

For information on progression with credit deficit please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13).

Those students entering the programme at SCQF level 7, and who successfully achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 7 (including all cores) can exit with Cert HE in Criminal Justice should they choose not to progress to the next level of the programme.

For information on the award of distinction please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.25).


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate an understanding of differing theories and representations of crime and deviance.
A2Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of contemporary developments in criminology and criminal justice and of their theoretical explanations.
A3 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the governance and values of institutions relevant to criminal justice.
A4Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the wider social and political relationship between crime and society.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply a basic range of analytic techniques appropriate to a research question or problem.
B2Identify the ethical issues in the formulation of a research investigation.
B3Show an awareness of a range of criminal justice and criminology sources and identify their validity.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Understand and interpret quantitative and qualitative data.
C2Carry out a range of basic procedures and report them effectively.
C3Communicate complex ideas in well -structured and coherent form using appropriate academic conventions.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Apply critical thinking in relation to issues, policies and developments within the realm of criminal justice studies.
D2Summarise and evaluate competing explanations and interpretations of social phenomena from a methodological perspective.
D3Analyse and apply criminal justice research findings to real-world situations.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Work effectively in autonomous and group settings, managing time, prioritising tasks and meeting deadlines.
E2Take responsibility for own learning and review and evaluate own learning and development.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8SOCY08021Foundations of Qualitative Research Methods20check mark  
8SOCY08022Foundations of Quantitative Research Methods20 check mark 
8CRIM08002Criminology Foundations20check mark  
8CRIM08008Introduction to Policing20check mark  
8CRIM08007Deconstructing Crime & Criminality20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8CRIM08011Crime, Media & Culture20 check mark 
8CHEM08016Introductory Forensic Science20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress to L9, students must meet the criteria outlined in University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13).

For information on progression with credit deficit please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.13).

Those students entering at SCQF level 7 or SCQF level 8, and who achieve at least 240 SCQF credits of which a minimum of 90 are at least SCQF level 8, including all cores, can exit with DipHE in Criminal Justice, should they chose not to progress to the next level of the programme.

For information on the award of distinction please refer to University Regulation, Chapter 3 (3.25).


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad range of knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of official responses to crime and offending behaviour and their relationship to social change.
A2Demonstrate critical knowledge of differing forms of crime and their social organisation and responses to them.
A3Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of a number of specialised areas of criminal justice.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Demonstrate an understanding of the empirical research process.
B2Demonstrate competence in research skills though practical activities.
B3Show an awareness of ethics in the research context.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Demonstrate an understanding of alternative means of presenting information.
C2Show the ability to communicate criminal justice knowledge through oral and written expression.
C3Demonstrate computer literacy through the use of a range of software packages.
C4Demonstrate the ability to interpret and use numerical and graphical data to report research findings.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Be able to retrieve and evaluate information from a range of sources.
D2Be able to describe and critically interpret research literature.
D3Be able to identify research questions and, with suitable academic support, devise appropriate strategies of investigation.
D4Demonstrate the ability to comprehend and evaluate a variety of forms of data, including statistical data.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Be able to work in group settings to achieve specified goals.
E2Have the capacity, within a supportive system, to undertake self-directed study and show awareness of time-management.
E3Be aware of the link between ethical guidelines and their implications for criminal justice research.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9SOCY09056Designing Your Dissertation Project20 check mark 
9CRIM09005Penology & Prisons20check mark  
9CRIM09024Crime Investigation20 check mark 
9CRIM09023Policing Communities20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Core for students choosing Criminal Justice Single Degree
CRIM09005 Penology & Prisons
SOCY09056 Designing your Dissertation Project


Core for students choosing Criminal Justice (Policing)
CRIM09023 Policing Communities
CRIM09024 Crime Investigation
CRIM09005 Penology & Prisons
SOCY09056 Designing your Dissertation Project

Please ensure that ONLY students who have been accepted on to the policing specialism enrol for CRIM09023 Policing Communities and CRIM 09024 Crime Investigation. No other students should enrol for these modules.

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9SOCY09055Data Analysis for the Social Sciences20check mark  
9SOCY09058Ethnicity, Racism & Social Relations20 check mark 
8CHEM08016Introductory Forensic Science20 check mark 
9CRIM09019Youth & Gang Violence20check mark  
9CRIM09021Contemporary Studies in Criminal Justice20check mark  
9CRIM09007Youth Justice20 check mark 
9CRIM09020Criminal Careers20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Note that to enable graduation with the BA Criminal Justice or Criminal Justice (Policing), or for progression to level 10, students must accumulate at least 120 credits during this year of study, 90 of which must come from Level 9. So students must not choose any more than one optional module that is categorised as Level 8. In addition, student are not permitted to retake an option when they have already completed that module i.e. if a student completed Criminal Justice Issues in Level 8, they must not choose this again in Level 9 of the programme.

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress to L10, students must meet the criteria outlined in University Regulations, Chapter 3 (3.13).

For information on progression with credit deficit please refer to University Regulations, Chapter 3 (3.14).

Those students who initially enter the programme at SCQF levels 7, 8 or 9 and who achieve at least 360 credits with 200 in the subject area of which a minimum of 90 are at least SCQF level 9, including all cores, can exit with the BA Criminal Justice, should they decide not to progress to the next level of the programme.

For information on the award of distinction please refer to University Regulations, Chapter 3 (3.25).


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Identify Human Rights issues in relation to crime and deviance.
A2Demonstrate a critical knowledge of criminological theory and concepts to understand the role of power - political and cultural - in defining crime, victimisation and responses to crime and deviance.
A3Demonstrate knowledge of, and evaluate, the trend and effects of crime, harm and victimisation in relation to criminal justice practices.
A4Demonstrate a critical understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.
A5Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of apposite research methods - including qualitative and quantitative - used in support of criminal justice enquiry.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Identify and critically assess questions for empirical investigation, formulate appropriate research questions and operationalise constructs accordingly.
B2Have the ability to select, conduct, analyse/evaluate and synthesise a range of criminal justice materials.
B3Appreciate and demonstrate the ability to apply appropriate ethical standards to the research process.
B4Use a wide range of the principal professional skills, techniques, practices and/or materials associated criminal justice practice.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Demonstrate the ability to present information to an informed audience.
C2Demonstrate the ability to comprehend and critically evaluate numerical, statistical and other forms of data within the research context.
C3Communicate with professional level peers and subject specialists.
C4Demonstrate competencies in a range of IT skills.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Demonstrate effective information retrieval and handling skills.
D2Demonstrate the ability to describe and critically evaluate research literature.
D3Be able to systematically identify problems and formulate questions for empirical investigation.
D4Demonstrate the ability to critically analyse, evaluate and use data in a variety of forms, including numerical and statistical data
D5Critically identify, define, conceptualise and analyse complex/professional problems and issues.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Be able to work effectively as part of a team or small group and react to and accommodate interpersonal and contextual factors.
E2Demonstrate the ability to undertake and manage self-directed study to achieve specified goals.
E3Demonstrate the ability to work independently and manage one’s own time.
E4Function as an independent learner capable of adopting a self reflective approach to learning.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10CRIM10004Criminal Justice Dissertation40check markcheck mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10CRIM10010Working in Criminal Justice20check mark  
10CRIM10003Comparative Justice20 check mark 
9CRIM09021Contemporary Studies in Criminal Justice20check mark  
10CRIM10009Crime as Social Harm20check mark  
10CRIM10001Victimology20check mark  
9CRIM09007Youth Justice20 check mark 
9CRIM09019Youth & Gang Violence20check mark  
10CRIM10005Security in a Global Age20 check mark 
9CRIM09020Criminal Careers20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Note that to enable graduation with the BA (Hons) Criminal Justice, students must accumulate at least 120 credits during this year of study, 90 of which must come from Level 10. So students must not choose any more than one optional module that is categorised as Level 9. In addition, student are not permitted to retake an option when they have already completed that module i.e. if a student completed Youth Justice in Level 9, they must not choose this again in Level 10 of the programme. Please note that choosing an option from level 9 is ONLY permitted if there is no timetable clash with the other level 10 scheduled modules, and that no timetable alterations can be made to accommodate level 10 students should there be such a clash, in that event level 10 students must choose another module that does not clash.

Criteria for Award

The award of BA (Hons) Criminal Justice / BA (Hons) Criminal Justice (Policing) is awarded to students who have at least 480 credits of which a minimum of 180 points are at SCQF Levels 9 and 10, and of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF Level 10.

Honours Classification will be awarded in line with the University Regulations, Chapter 3 (3.20 – 3.24).


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework.

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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