University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2020/21

Last modified: 04/05/2020 16:59:29

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Music Technology Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Music Technology
BSc  Music Technology
Dip HE  Music Technology
Cert HE  Music Technology

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:JAMES
Maximum Period of Registration:Normally 7 years full time and 11 years part time
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:Colin Grassie

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Year 1 – SCQF Level 7 entry

• SQA Highers: BBBC including Music/Music Technology.

Plus English and Mathematics or Physics at SQA standard grade, Intermediate 2 or National 5.


or GCE

Year 1
• GCE A-Levels: CCC including Music/Music Technology and Maths or Physics or Computer Science
• Irish Leaving Certificate: H3H3H3H4 including Music plus either Maths, Physics or Technology
• International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma: 24 points (including 4, 4 at HL).
• BTEC National Diploma: Music Technology.
Other European or International qualifications will be accepted where reference to NARIC demonstrates equivalency and candidates meet the universities requirements for English Language certification.


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Year 2

SQA HNC / BTEC Level 4 HNC: Sound Production; Music and Audio Production (for SQA awards, with Grade A in the Graded Unit)
SQA HND in subjects which have overlap with the programme such as HND Music
Students with non-standard qualifications will be considered on their merit.

Students must be able to satisfy the general admission requirement of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Section 6 of the University Regulatory Framework. Students in this category may have HNC, A-level, HND or non-standard qualifications and must demonstrate a cognisance of and active engagement with Music Technology at an appropriate level.

Year 3
• SQA HND / BTEC Level 5 HND: Sound Production; Music and Audio Production or relevant discipline (for SQA awards, with Grade B in the Graded Unit)


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applicants without formal qualifications, who have relevant work experience, may be considered for entry. Applicants are referred to the School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences for entry to this programme


Further desirable skills pre-application

Applicants will be expected to demonstrate evidence of active involvement in music technology at an appropriate level, for example, suitable activities may include sound reinforcement, recording, composing, performing or organising events within or outside school and college. Applicants at level 9 will be expected to provide a link to their online portfolio.


General Overview

Music Technology is a broad ranging course which provides students with the knowledge and practical experience to work in a range of areas within the music, audio and media industries. We offer areas of study through a number of content streams focussed on developing high-calibre graduates employable in the following areas:

  • Acoustics
  • Audio post-production
  • Audio software development
  • Electronic music composition
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Game audio
  • Immersive audio
  • Live sound engineering
  • Music production and Mastering
  • Sound design
  • Video production

This Honours programme is accredited by JAMES (Joint Audio Media Education Support) and is an AVID Learning Partner (offering the opportunity to gain Pro Tools certification)

Students will use current industry standard equipment and software for live sound reinforcement and acoustics analysis, studio recording and production, location recording and audio post-production, electronic music composition and sound design. They will produce and professionally process music and audio ready for distribution for applications including web and multimedia, film, animation, and computer games.

Guest speakers from industry also form part of the programme to further deepen understanding of the subject.

YEAR 1

Students will be introduced to modern audio/music recording and production techniques through creating podcasts, studio recording projects with Apple Logic and AVID Pro Tools systems and creating computer based music. Within live sound and acoustics they will work with analogue consoles and small PA systems. They will also investigate and develop an appreciation of the scope of the music and media industry.

  • Audio For Broadcast
  • Recording and Production 1
  • The Creative Computing Professional
  • Acoustics and Sound Reinforcement
  • Music Production Analysis
  • Computer Music
     

YEAR 2

Studio recording and production techniques are further developed with a deeper focus on industry technical standards. Students will study electronic music and understand MIDI control through composition and sound design in Ableton. Audio post production work enhances skills in synchronisation, editing and processing techniques for deliverable media.  Practical impulse response capture and room acoustics theory provides students with contextualised learning in reverberation, room design and acoustic analysis.  Continuing studies in sound reinforcement theory and systems will culminate with group work and the technical production of a live music event. Programming skills will be developed using a web based language.

  • Audio Post-Production
  • Electroacoustics
  • Live Sound Production
  • Recording and Production 2
  • Audio Programming
  • Electronic Music


YEAR 3

Students will work in small production teams with musicians and artists producing professional multi-song recordings (EP's), video and web content for promotional purposes for the artist. This will be used to showcase employable skills within a portfolio context. Music and media industry business and legal aspects are studied in terms of employment and entrepreneurship. Audio processing is introduced through the creation of a suite of effects developed in Max For Live for Ableton Live. Students will have an opportunity to participate in a music industry placement in the UK or abroad in a partner institution, such as the Harris Institute, or alternatively develop theoretical and applicable skills in the field of immersive audio.

  • The Music and Media Industry
  • Audio Visual Integration
  • Professional Studio Practice
  • Audio Signal Processing
  • Music Technology Project
  • Immersive Audio // Work Based Learning

Year 3 is also an entry point for students progressing from further education.


YEAR 4 (HONOURS)
 

The honours year features an extensive individual project culminating in the production of a dissertation and portfolio assets.  Students can customise their topic to enable them to develop specialised knowledge and skills developing towards their area of interest for future employment.

Students will be required to raise the quality of their work to implement professional and European standards for the delivery of audio in stereo and surround formats.

Using professional mastering software and applying critical listening skills, students will finalise stereo music tracks for multi-platform distribution. They will produce and synchronise all the audio and music assets required to complete a 5.1 surround soundtrack for a short film or animation.

Students will apply the principles of signal processing in the development of software synthesisers and generative MIDI sequencing devices using Max For Live in Ableton Live. 

Students will develop sound design and compositional skills to the specific requirements of Computer Games. An honours degree at 2:1 level or above in Music technology is a suitable qualification for progression to MSc studies.

  • Music Technology Major Project
  • Audio Mastering
  • Audio For Film & Animation
  • Advanced Audio Signal Processing
  • Computer Games Audio

Career paths in the following areas include: acoustics (graduate trainee acoustician), audio post production (sound editor/dubbing engineer), music composition (composer, electronic musician), music production (studio recording/mixing/mastering engineer); live sound or broadcast (engineer); sound systems design and installation (engineer/consultant), sound design (audio for film, animation and games), theatre-sound (technical engineer), video post-production (editor/ADR), technical sales and management,  and within further and higher education. Many graduates work as freelancers while some set up their own business.

Students may apply to progress to the full or part time MA Music framework comprising:

    MA Music (Industries)
    MA Music (Sound Production)
    MA Music (Songwriting)
    MA Music (generic programme)

or apply to register for a postgraduate research .

Examples of suitable external postgraduate opportunities for Music Technology graduates include:

MA Sound Production at the University of the West of Scotland
MSc in "Digital Composition and Performance" at the University of Edinburgh
MSc in “Acoustics and Music Technology” at the University of Edinburgh
MDes in "Sound for the moving image" at the Glasgow School of Art
MSc (online) “Sound Design” at Edinburgh Napier University

 

The teaching, learning and assessment strategy is designed to help students master the learning outcomes and also to allow them to demonstrate their highest level of competency.

Many of the learning outcomes of the programme are practical in nature and a large proportion of class time is spent in computing laboratories engaging with the appropriate tools (software, hardware etc) acquiring practical knowledge and understanding through a variety of activities. The theoretical and societal/historical knowledge and understanding underpinning the subject is mainly engendered through lectures, tutorials, seminars and by individual study. In turn the practical classes reinforce the underpinning knowledge. Active learning is promoted through a number of practical assignments. A number of classes and assignments will involve problem solving through analysis, evaluation and the synthesis of a solution, the complexity of this process increasing in level from year to year.

The Music Technology programme has the QAA subject benchmarks for computing and music as reference points.  The music benchmark includes aspects of Music technology and Industry and identifies areas which include: acoustics, music and (digital) media, and music production.

The programme delivery makes use of a range of teaching and learning methods suggested in the benchmark statements which include:

  • Lectures
  • Personal research
  • Small group teaching and group project work
  • One to one interaction
  • Computing and acoustics laboratory practical exercises
  • Studio and computer worksation (DAW) laboratory work
  • Field work, in the context of engineering live sound and location recording.
  • Peer learning through discussion of colleagues work.
  • Independent learning
  • External placements

Knowledge and understanding is assessed partly through class tests, written academic discourse and also by the structure it gives to practical work assignments and by reflective practice exercises. The applied knowledge and understanding will be obtained largely through practical work both individually and in groups.

Students are expected to undertake independent study both to supplement and consolidate what is being taught in formal classes. Much of the teaching is supported by the Moodle virtual learning environment and other online materials developed by academic staff. The framework provided to students, for independent study, develops as they become increasingly independent. In early years the students are expected to complete exercises, the nature of which is well specified. As they progress through the course and develop increasing independence the nature of the tasks becomes more challenging.

In each module scheduled labs and exercises enable students to monitor their own progress. The assessment methods address the full range of skills by combining coursework and examination appropriate for the learning outcomes being assessed. A range of course works are developed which test different competencies such as operational skills on software and hardware platforms and creativity in musical applications. The nature of the programme ensures that ICT skills are developed in most modules. Communication skills are developed through the use of reports, presentations etc. Numeric skills appear in many design and planning exercises. Practical work is a mix of individual and group work that develops the ability to work independently and as part of a group taking on different roles as required.

Students can complete many laboratory activities off campus by installing public domain software or remotely accessing specialist servers for particular modules. In some cases work performed on student resources can be saved in a standard format to be imported to the industry standard software used in the programme. Students on this programme benefit from the cooperation between the School of  Business and Creative Industries and the School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences.

Personal development and employability skills will be embedded into the modules and are incremental throughout the duration of the student experience. PDP may not necessarily be assessed but core and employability skills will be. In first year professional attitudes to PDP will be encouraged alongside the development of industry awareness. Students will be encouraged to maintain a PDP portfolio of feedback, evidence, reflection and goals. Support will be available through tools for e-portfolio development (Moodle VLE). Guidance by staff should be in the form of articulation of goals, support in actions to achieve goals, and encouragement to monitor and reflect on progress. Every student has a personal tutor.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

Employability is developed through the course.

This commences at level 7 where students gain an insight into the various roles and responsibilities within the creative technologies industry. The body of knowledge developed through the programme is well focussed on the needs of industry. Students are aware of rights issues as they apply to the music industry. There are several opportunities to develop presentation and self-promotion skills encouraged by the industrial advisory board which culminate with participation in a “Digital Futures” exhibition where honours graduates present their work to industry representatives.

The delivery of personal development planning will be based on the development of a student’s personal e-Portfolio. The principles of PDP and e-Portfolios will be introduced within a core module during level 7 Trimester 1. Thereafter PDP will be embedded within the core modules of the programme at all levels. Although PDP will be linked to learning outcomes at every opportunity it will be predominantly formative but may also draw on assessed activities. The aim is not only to encourage students to develop skills such as numeracy, language, study skills, employability and analytical thought but also to raise students' self-awareness and confidence through a process of critical reflection and planning.

The council for Industry and Higher Education (CIHE) has identified a range of employability competences which include: cognitive skills, Generic Competences, Personal Capabilities, Technical Ability, Business and organisational awareness, practical and professional elements. The Quality Assurance Agency has mapped these against the SCQF framework in its document “Benchmarking Employability: a Scottish perspective” and this feeds into the PDP programme.

Through taught modules including: “the creative computing profession” and “the music and media industry” together with opportunities for “creative technology placements” students will:

  • develop the ability to articulate their employability skills
  • become familiar with competence-based interviewing and assessment
  • enhance their CVs and portfolios
  • work on personal development planning

UK Music is the umbrella organisation which represents the collective interests of the UK’s music industry from artists, musicians, songwriters and composers, to record labels, managers, music publishers, studio producers, music licensing organisations and the live music industry.  

The members of UK Music are: AIM, BPI, FAC, Ivors Academy, MMF, MPA, MPG, MU, PPL, PRS For Music and the Live Music Group. 

UK Music (2019) Music By Numbers.[research report]London: UK Music. (Music By Numbers pulls together its forerunner reports, Measuring Music and Wish You Were Here) 

Report Highlights:  

  • The UK music industry contributed £5.2 billion to the UK economy in 2018.  

  • The total export revenue of the music industry was £2.7 billion. 

  • Industry Employment sustains 190,935 full-time jobs 

For Glasgow alone the figure was £105 Million with a total live music attendance in 2015 of 1.4 Million.  This underlines the commercial importance of live music and the Music Technology programme responds to this by providing training and opportinities to develop professional practice in sound reinforcement.

The sector skills council for the creative and cultural industries has described the music industry in terms of the size and shape of the sector, Drivers of skills demand, Education and training, current and future skills needs.

Four drivers of skills demand are identified. Rapid developments in IT and Digital Technology are pushing back the boundaries of new music. Electronic distribution creates new challenges to the protection of intellectual property. Marketing and promotion now requires high impact to access global markets. The large number of small firms requires entrepreneurial skills.

Current and future skills needs identified which this programme addresses include IT and Technical skills. The sector skills council encourages more collaboration between technology firms and universities to keep up with new developments. Live music production is seen as an area with a high demand for occupational roles. Awareness of contract law and intellectual property rights are regarded as essential. The number of musicians involved in composition is expected to rise. All of these aspects are embedded in this programme.

Despite 8% of the music industry being in Scotland the current educational provision is only 2% of the market so there is clearly scope for a programme such as this to survive however there are also warnings to bear in mind that the music industry does not see formal courses as always satisfying their needs and as a result industry courses and vendor qualifications have proliferated. It is essential that the current programme takes account of this by seeking to maximise relevance to employment and protecting the reputation which the programme has achieved in recent years.

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

The placement module is a recommended option within this programme at level 9 offering students the opportunity of a relevant work experience.

This credit-bearing module offers the student 3 ways to achieve credit: –

Industry based work
The student works in an environment that is relevant to their study and organised by the School or in co-operation with partner institutions overseas.

Project work
The students on a short-term basis are encouraged to set up their own company and undertake a relevant project. The project can be company based or created by the student and School or a combination of all three.

Mentoring
Opportunities for structured mentoring are developed through the industry advisory board.

The module reflects a commitment to both the Employability and PDP agendas and is directly related to the professional practice skills and transferable skills embedded in all programmes.

Assessment includes a report which includes a reflective review of the students’ experiences and achievements during the placement.

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Explain and describe the relationship between music technology development, digital distribution and music promotion. (MPA)
A2Explain acoustic principles and relevant health and safety issues as they apply to sound reinforcement. (ASR)
A3Demonstrate an overall appreciation of the major theories, principals and concepts within digital audio technology. (RP1)
A4Define key roles within relevant sectors of the creative industries and how these relate to each other. (CPP)

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Configure, construct and test a live sound system to pre-defined criteria. (ASR)
B2Apply some of the basic and routine professional skills, techniques, practices associted with digital music production. (RP1)
B3Record, edit, and process audio appropriately in terms of quality and final programme levels. (AFB)
B4Apply studio-based skills creatively, to produce a short folio of compositions. (CM)

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Convey complex ideas in a well-structured and coherent form related to music production, music technology, and musicology. (MPA)
C2Identify, design and specify live sound system components for a given project. (ASR)
C3Successfully plan an audio production artefact suitable for broadcast in relation to a project brief. (AFB)
C4Document compositions to show the process and structure of composition and to evaluate the result against contemporary electronic music artists and styles. (CM)

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Identify and evaluate a range of contemporary music production techniques. (MPA)
D2Analyse selected topics and concepts in contemporary media and multi-platform delivery. (AFB, RP1)
D3Use a range of approaches to address defined and routine problems and issues within a recording studio environment. (RP1)
D4Analyse the structure and content of contemporary music and computer Music. (MPA, CM)
D5Reflect on current skills development and to develop an initial personal development plan. (CPP)

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Work safely with others in support of current professional practice in live sound reinforcement under guidance. (ASR)
E2Develop the skills of working within a team. (CCP, AFB, RP1)

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7COMP07076Music Production Analysis20      
7COMP07068Recording and Production 130      
7COMP07065Audio For Broadcast20      
7COMP07071The Creative Computing Professional10      
7COMP07052Acoustics and Sound Reinforcement20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7COMP07007Computer Music20       1

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Choose 1 (20 Credit) module from the list above or other modules in consultation with the Programme Leader.

Criteria for Progression and Award

Standard UWS progression regulations will apply.

Students who achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 7 or above, including the core modules above, will be eligible for the exit award Certificate of Higher Education (Cert HE) Music Technology

Students who achieve 120 credits at SCQF level 7 or above, but do not achieve all the core credits above for the programme, may be eligible for the Certificate of Higher Education (Cert HE) in Information Technology


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate, through research, an understanding of the current methods, technologies and applications of post-production. (APP)
A2Describe the design and specification of a recording studio environment. (EA)
A3Demonstrate detailed knowledge of the use of a digital mixing desk and PA system applied to the live reproduction of sound. (LSP)
A4Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of digital studio technology in relation to equipment interfacing, software and data distribution. (RP2)
A5Develop a broad knowledge of computer programming principles and constructs and apply these to an audio programming context. (AP)

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Record, mix and produce audio to a professional standard for post-production. (APP)
B2Make physical measurements of electroacoustic devices and environment. (EA)
B3Demonstrate proficiency in the use of a range music software applications through sound design. (EM)
B4Demonstrate transferrable skills in working across simulation and measurement software provided by different equipment manufacturers
B5Apply professional working practices to product delivery in terms of formatting, final dynamic levelling and the use of metadata. (RP2)

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Successfully plan, organise and document a post-production project. (APP)
C2Research and investigate a specified live sound topic and present a referenced formal report. (LSP)
C3Use a range of audio-based ICT applications to process and obtain audio measurement data. (EA)
C4Develop programmes implementing MIDI and OSC communication protocols. (AP)

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Evaluate, specify, compare and justify the use of audio equipment in a variety of applications. (EA)
D2Analyse and respond to the technical and aesthetic requirement of visual media in the post production of audio content (APP)

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Work, under guidance, with others to acquire an understanding of current professional practice. (EA, APP, RP2)
E2Manage resources within defined areas of work (EA, APP, RP2)

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8COMP08065Live Sound Production20      
8COMP08066Audio Programming20      
8COMP08007Electroacoustics20      
8COMP08064Recording and Production 220      
8COMP08052Audio Post-Production20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8MUSC08013Creating & Producing an Event20       Ayr Campus
8COMP08009Electronic Music20       1

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Choose 1 (20 Credit) module from the list above or other modules in consultation with the Programme Leader.

Criteria for Progression and Award

Standard UWS progression rules will apply.

Students who achieve 240 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L8 or above, including the core modules above, will be eligible for the exit award Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) in Music Technology

Students who achieve 240 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L8 or above, but do not achieve all the core modules for the award may be eligible for the Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) in Information Technology.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate and understanding of the physics and psychoacoustics theory of spatial audio. (IA)
A2Demonstrate specialised knowledge in the issues involved in developing multimedia products across a range of platforms. (MTP, AVI, PSP)
A3Demonstrate knowledge, understanding and application of the basic principles of audio signal processing. (ASP)
A4Demonstrate, through research, an understanding of the current areas of employment within a given sector of the music and media industries. (MMI).

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Perform multi-channel, multi-dimensional sound recordings. (IA)
B2Demonstrate the practical ability to produce an appropriately edited, processed and compiled video sequence. (AVI)
B3Demonstrate the production skills and knowledge necessary for the creation of an online promotional portfolio for a band or artist.(MTP)
B4Demonstrate skill in using personal computer hardware and software to produce and document prototype audio software plugins.(ASP)

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Apply appropriate planning and preparation to a video sequence to be used in application for post-production sound synchronisation purposes. (AVI)
C2Successfully design and implement a website which can be used to host a media rich portfolio. (MMI)

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Reproduce and evaluate sound in a variety of immersive audio formats. (IA)
D2Evaluate the practical use of prototype plugins within a commercial digital audio workstation. (ASP)
D3Prepare a report which facilities research into a chosen field of employment (in the music and media industry). (MMI)
D4Evaluate elements of the work experience as it relates to themes and issues of academic study. (WBL 3)

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Negotiate appropriate learning objectives in conjunction with the University and the external client if appropriate. (WBL 3)
E2Demonstrate the application of planning, organisation, personnel management and project management to the completion of a substantial group work project. (MTP)
E3Take responsibility for managing the performance of external artists working within the studio environment. (PSP, MTP)

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9COMP09061Professional Studio Practice20      
9COMP09008Audio Visual Integration20      
9COMP09010Audio Signal Processing20       2
9COMP09091Music and Media Industries20       1, 2
9COMP09032Music Technology Project20       1

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
1. Within the Music Technology programme, 60 credits at level 9 may be substituted by credit gained from approved programmes of study abroad as part of the Erasmus scheme in the cognate area of Music Technology where the learning outcomes of the programme have been considered and comply with University Regulation 5.2.10b which states:
“Students taking a period of study abroad or at another institution as part of an exchange programme will require to have the modules they are taking internationally, approved and signed off by the Programme Leader, PAB Chair and
School-based Erasmus or International Co-ordinator as meeting the required level and outcomes for the University’s award (a form is available for this process from Registry). In addition, there needs to be a translation of the international partner’s grading system as part of the exchange agreement to enable candidates to have the exchange credit count towards any award with distinction and this needs to be drawn to the attention of the appropriate PAB Chair by the Programme Leader.”


Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9COMP09104Immersive Audio20      
9WRKB09002WBL 3 - Work-Based Project (20 point)20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Choose 1 (20 Credit) module from the list above or other modules in consultation with the Programme Leader.

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression with credit deficit from SCQF level 9 to level 10 is not normally permitted.

BSc Music Technology
Standard UWS progression regulations will apply. In particular, students may not progress to the Honours level of the programme until they have met the requirements for BSc award.

Students who have completed 360 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L9 or above, including the core modules above will be eligible for the award Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Music Technology

Students who achieve 360 credits of which a minimum of 90 credits are at SCQF L9 or above, but do not achieve all the core credits for the programme may be eligible for the Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Information Technology.

The award of distinction will be made in accordance with University Regulation 7.5.2 which requires:
“A mean mark of 70% or above. (The student must pass the modules at the first attempt and the mean mark to be used in determining distinction will also be taken from the module marks at the first attempt.) and none of the 120 credit points taken in the final SCQF level of the award comprises prior credit imported from outside the University, unless the prior credit derives from a student exchange or study abroad programme in which a translation of the relevant grading system into the University system has been approved by the programme leader as part of the exchange agreement.”


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a critical understanding of the principal theories, concepts and principles that are at the forefront of the subject for a defined Music Technology topic.(MTMP)
A2Demonstrate a critical understanding of the principal theories, concepts and principles of audio aesthetics and non-linear editing.(CGA)
A3Demonstrate knowledge and application of computer based sound synthesis techniques by the construction of a prototype instrument. (AASP)
A4Display critical understanding of the technologies, principles and practice of audio mastering. (AM)
A5Demonstrate a critical understanding of industry standards regarding audio-post production mixing standards & delivery methods on a local and international level.(AFFA)

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply a range of skills, techniques and practices that are specialised, advanced and at the forefront of the subject for a defined Music Technology topic. (MTMP)
B2Apply a wide range of the principal professional skills, techniques and practices through the development of audio assets for non-linear media.(CGA)
B3Demonstrate a critical and high level understanding of the appropriate application of various mastering techniques and processes. (AM)
B4Utilise a range of hardware and software to demonstrate an ability to create a finished audio-post-production artefact to a professional level, technically and creatively.(AFFA)

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Present or convey, formally and informally, information about specialised topics to informed audiences. (MTMP)
C2Demonstrate numeracy in the exercise of a computer language for audio synthesis. (AASP)
C3Interpret, use and evaluate numerical and graphical data to make judgements of equipment specification. (AM)

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Critically review and consolidate knowledge, skills, practices and thinking in a defined Music Technology topic(MTMP)
D2Evaluate and synthesise contemporary methods for music and sound design for non-linear media. (CGA)
D3Research specified aspects of audio synthesis; analyse, synthesise and implement findings. (AASP)
D4Make and justify subjective critical judgements on musical aesthetics. (AM)

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in professional/equivalent activities through the delivery of practical and written project outcomes.(MTMP)
E2Work with a high level of autonomy demonstrating standard and advanced mastering techniques. (AM)
E3Work with peers to bring about new thinking on audio issues.(AM, AFFA)

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10COMP10006Music Technology Major Project40      
10COMP10056Audio for Film & Animation20      
10COMP10007Audio Mastering20      
10COMP10008Adv Audio Signal Processing20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10COMP10009Computer Games Audio20      

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Choose 1 (20 Credit) module from the list above or other modules in consultation with the Programme Leader.

Criteria for Award

BSc (Hons) Music Technology

Students who have completed 480 credits of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF L10 or above, including the core modules as above, will be eligible for the award BSc (Hons) Music Technology

Students who achieve 480 credits of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF L10 or above, but do not achieve all the core credits for the programme may be eligible for the BSc (Hons) in Information Technology.

A Music Technology BSc(Hons) (Single) Degree may be awarded for credit of at least 480 of which a minimum of 200 in the subject as determined by core modules at SCQF 9 or an approved programme of study abroad through the Erasmus scheme and SCQF 10 of which a minimum of at least 100 at level 10.



Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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