University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2022/23

Last modified: 24/04/2022 21:48:08

Named Award Title:BEng (Hons) Chemical Engineering (Sandwich Available) Single

Award Title for Each Award: BEng (Hons)  Chemical Engineering (Sandwich Available)
BSc  Chemical Engineering (Sandwich Available)
Dip HE  Engineering
Cert HE  Engineering Science

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:IChemE
Maximum Period of Registration:6 years (including optional Sandwich placement)
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:Andy Durrant

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Year 1: H: BBBC including Maths and Chemistry plus SQA Standard Grade Chemistry and English.

Year 2: Entry may be possible with: SQA Advanced Highers: CCD (Chemistry, Maths and Physics).


or GCE

Year 1: BBC including Maths and 1 science (Chemistry preferred), plus 3 GCSEs including Chemistry and English. GCE A-Level: CC including Maths and one science (preferably Chemistry)
Year 2: GCE A-Level: BCC (Chemistry, Maths and Physics).


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Year 2 HNC Chemical Engineering or related subject (including Process Technologies).
Year 3 HND Chemical Engineering or related subject (including Process Technologies).


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applicants may also be considered with other academic, vocational or professional qualifications deemed to be equivalent.


Further desirable skills pre-application


General Overview

The programme is designed to provide a sound fundamental knowledge of engineering and related enabling sciences, and the practical skills to operate successfully in areas such as the chemical industry, pharmaceutical industry, energy industry, environmental sector, food industry, electronic industry, as well as in academic research and teaching. Chemical engineering degrees at the university are recognised by employers as having a strong applied focus which is a good preparation for work in many industries. Professional skills are developed throughout the programme through practical and project work, problem solving activities with the aid of computer technology, group working, together with the analytical, numerical, management and communication skills which are expected of the modern engineer.
The programme combines a strong academic content with the opportunity for direct, hands-on experience in the laboratory and during industrial placement with modern processing equipment and process design and analysis software.
The programme includes an optional industrial placement which allows the development of additional skills and can enhance employability.
 

Students with an Honours degree may proceed to postgraduate studies for MSc / PhD at this or other universities.

Chemical Engineering covers a wide variety of theoretical, conceptual and practical areas, and requires its practitioners to display and exercise a range of knowledge and skills. Delivery of the programme therefore involves a diversity of teaching and assessment methods appropriate to the learning outcomes of the modules and of the overall programme, as indicated below: Lectures are used to present, discuss and evaluate subject matter and content. Tutorial work is closely integrated with the lecture material, and generally requires students to solve problems or otherwise to develop understanding of the materials presented. Investigations and case studies require students to gather, organise and evaluate numerical or non-numerical information, either individually or on a group basis (the latter specifically designed to develop team work skills). Most modules involve an element of practical work, to develop laboratory skills, to familiarise students with modern process equipment and experimental techniques and to enhance practical, analytical, investigative, evaluative and presentational skills. Assignments, investigations, laboratory results and other coursework require presentation in a variety of forms, developing skills in oral and written presentation and in the application of various forms of IT. The level and intensity of the programme is developed throughout the programme in line with SCQF criteria for each level, while the content is closely aligned with QAA subject benchmark statements at all stages. Student autonomy and individual responsibility for learning is encouraged at all levels and PDP is developed throughout the programme.

The programme and programme specification has been reviewed and updated taking cognisance of the University’s Curriculum Framework principles as discussed below.

Student Centred

Reflection on learning is inherent and credit bearing in all years of the programme.

Advanced entry to the programme is available where RPL/CPD/informal learning is evidenced.

Access to student support (programme team, peers and wider University student services) is promoted at induction, through personal tutoring/year/programme leader, group activity in all levels of the programme, SCQF Level appropriate employability and careers sessions and within modules evident in entry level of the programme.

Engagement and progress is monitored by module coordinators, this takes the form of VLE analytics, assessment engagement, on-campus activity engagement and formative and summative assessment engagement. Monthly meetings with year leads and programme leads allows the programme teams to respond appropriately and quickly both from a student and programme learning, teaching and assessment perspective.

Co-creation of curriculum is challenging due to the need to demonstrate that Engineering Council learning outcomes are met by all students. However, within a number of modules students can determine the direction of their learning with boundaries set to ensure the assessment is fit for purpose[1].

Flexible and Hybrid

Hybrid delivery of the programme is demonstrated through the recording of accessible lecture content and on-campus tutorial, laboratory or group work activity. The timetables are produced to ensure on-campus learning time is efficiently maximised.

Simple and Coherent

The programme has multiple exit award points as demonstrated in the programme specification and students are supported/counselled appropriately by the programme leader after examiners’ panels.

Programme teams are aware of the programme learning outcomes through ongoing programme development meetings. The importance of the modular outcomes and assessment approaches on the overall programme outcomes and Engineering Council’s learning outcomes, student feedback and sustainability are core to the discussions at these meetings. Students are made aware of the programme learning outcomes at induction, module introductions and programme development workshops. A capstone module is present at L10- Chemical Engineering Design Study.

Assessment, wherever possible, follows real-world activities examination is required as part of the accreditation requirements however this follows an open-book approach providing time-bound, individually assessed, unfamiliar problems- assessing content and developing a number of important meta-skills. All modules have inherent tutorial activity with formative assessment providing concurrent feedback allowing implementable feed-forward.

Academic accreditation is the mark of assurance that individual engineering programmes within higher education meet the required overall standards set by the engineering profession and defined by the Engineering Council (EngC). The programme prepares students for a career in engineering and the content is guided and evaluated by the Engineering Councils Standard for Professional Engineering Competence and Commitment.

Meta-skills are embedded in the programme as is required by the Engineering Council and these include digital skills, creativity, critical thinking, innovation, and entrepreneurship and social enterprise.

Students are assessed in a variety of ways and settings including, practical, written, oral, time-bound, group, real-world environment, creative, critical thinking and this broad approach to assessment provides a number of transferrable skills to be developed whilst assessing.

Inclusivity

The programme team have reviewed the content of the AdvanceHE Anti-Racist Curriculum Project[2] and are aware that in this regard ‘curricular reform is a continual process rather than a final destination’. With this in mind further institutional guidance is welcomed to ensure that every effort has been made to ensure the curriculum is and continues to be anti-racist and inclusive for all. 

Sustainability

Wherever possible modules are shared with other engineering programmes to maximise efficiency with specific programme contextualised components of learning, teaching and assessment. All modules have been reviewed to ensure they meet the norms around contact hours. 

[1] https://www.uws.ac.uk/media/8142/assessment-handbook-2021-22.pdf

[2] https://www.advance-he.ac.uk/anti-racist-curriculum-project


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

UWS’ Graduate Attributes focus on academic, personal and professional skills and throughout the programmes that these skills develop competent and innovative graduates who are universally prepared, work-ready and successful (https://www.uws.ac.uk/current-students/your-graduate-attributes/).

Upon completing this programme the students will be equipped with tools that will help them in their journey to be work-ready, successful and universal.

The programme develops critical thinking and analytical skills that enhance the students’ ability to deal with complicated issues and make them problem solvers. It encourages them to become motivated, innovative, autonomous, inquisitive, creative and imaginative.

The programme and the teaching approaches encourage collaborative working, effective communications, resilience and perseverance, and development of research and inquiry skills.

The aim is to produce graduates who are knowledgeable with excellent digital skills fit for the 21st century and aware of the global context in which they operate and the challenges that face humanity in the 21st century in the areas of water, food, energy, environment and well-being, who strive to lead, influence and dare to make transformational changes while being ethically-minded, socially responsible, critically aware of the environmental and social impacts of their decisions and actions, and culturally sensitive.

The professionally accredited B Eng (Hons) Chemical Engineering programme provides opportunities throughout all levels to enable these skills to be developed and focussed appropriately.

The chemical and process engineering knowledge is developed throughout the programme using a variety of means including direct contact, projects, research, simulation and other productivity software utilisation wherever possible. This allows the development of graduates who are continuous learners, adaptive, innovative and leaders with the requirements of the 21st century chemical and process industries.

Particularly, but not exclusively, in later years of the programme, critical analytical and inquiry skills are developed and used to solve industry related problems. Many of these are set in and constrained by consideration of engineering, safety, environmental protection, economics, and the over-arching regulatory frameworks for the chemical industry.

Projects and research activities  are used to prepare designs and analyse problems here incisive and innovative solutions are required to be effectively presented as part of collaborative groups or as individual autonomous learning activities.

The programme promotes cultural awareness and emotional intelligence with a variety of group exercises developing resilient, ambitious and enterprising leadership qualities whilst ensuring that group members are emotionally and culturally aware and respectful communication and behaviours are the norm.

Commercial awareness is linked to process design activities throughout the programme ensuring that costs associated with any process including capital costs, operating costs and/or decommissioning costs are evaluated and compared to other possible alternatives.

Ethical awareness and social responsibility are developed throughout as integral part of the programme. A total approach that considers impact on human, biota and the environment is followed.

Links to current University and programme research are promoted through the programme with opportunities for students to become involved in aspects of the research from the earliest opportunity either discretely or as part of an assessment.

The existing arragements for PDP (Personal Development Planning) are being phased out as the UWS replace them with a university-wide approach.  The timetabled PDP sessions will be associated with the following core modules for the Chemical Engineering programme:

Level 8:

Term 1: Chemical Engineering Fundamentals

Term 2: Design Analysis 1 and Process Modelling and Simulation

Level 9:

Term 2: Process Design, Control and Safety

Term 1: Chemical Process Principles

Level 10:

Term 1 & 2: Chem Eng Design Study

Term 2: Process Dynamics and Control

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

The programme includes a thick based approach to Workplace learning which involves a year placement between third and fourth year. If a student completes at least 36 weeks of work placed learning the student is eligible for the ‘sandwich award’ title
The programme offers a 40 credit, Workplace Learning module which must be agreed and documented according to the module descriptor before the module can be undertaken. The module is ENGG00001.

Engagement

In line with the Academic Engagement Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on the relevant learning platform, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Where a programme has Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body requirements these will be listed here:

Students are expected to attend all timetabled sessions and to engage with all formative and summative assessment elements of all the modules that are included in the programme specification as core modules as well as any optional module when applicable.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of chemical structures, reactions and equilibria, relate knowledge to chemical theories, concepts and principles, and show an awareness of the evidence base for chemical science
A2Show an awareness of the fundamentals of engineering sciences.
A3Appreciate basic issues in health and safety at work.
A4Show an awareness of the different engineering materials and their properties.
A5Develop the ability of engineering and scientific problem solving using applied mathematics.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply basic knowledge and skills in solving routine problems in engineering and chemistry
B2Demonstrate the practice of basic laboratory skills
B3Be able to carry out risk assessments before carrying out basic laboratory and workshop activities
B4Introduce the use and application of technical literature and other information sources.
B5Develop practical engineering skills acquired through individual and group project work and the use of CAD packages.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Tackle a range of numerical and non-numerical problems in theoretical and practical situations
C2Present information in a variety of forms relevant to the context
C3Obtain information and data from standard sources.
C4Present and understand graphical depiction of information and engineering drawings

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Present and evaluate information and ideas in the handling of chemical and engineering issues
D2Use a range of approaches to the solution of routine problems.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise some initiative in and take responsibility for defined activities
E2Take supervision especially in unfamiliar laboratory situations
E3Work with others in defined group exercises
E4Develop skills in planning, self-learning and improving performance, as the foundation for lifelong learning/CPD.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7ENGG07002Applied Engineering Science20check markcheck mark 
7CHEM07011Chemistry & Reactions20 check mark 
7MATH07006Engineering Mathematics 110check mark  
7MATH07007Engineering Mathematics 210 check mark 
7ENGG07001Engineering Mechanics20 check mark 
7CHEM07003Structure of Chemistry20check mark  
7ENGG07004Technical Communications20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Rules for progression are as given in the university’s regulatory framework.
A Certificate in Higher Education Engineering Science is available in accordance with University regulations. (At least 120 credits at at SCQF level 7 or above).
Progression to SCQF level 8 is subject to academic advice and module prerequisites.

Refer to Regulation 3.13 regarding progression with credit deficit, note, the decision to permit a proceed with carry is not automatic but is subject to detailed discussion at the SBE.


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of main areas of chemical engineering and develop understanding of the components of a chemical process facility and familiarity with the different equipment used in the process industry.
A2Display an understanding of some major core theories and principles of engineering, mathematics and chemistry.
A3Show some knowledge of major current issues pertaining to the process industry and appreciate the importance of safety, environmental protection and sustainability in chemical engineering context.
A4Develop an appreciation of the basic issues related to chemical and process engineering.
A5Development of knowledge and understanding of the mathematical principles underpinning chemical engineering and develop the ability to apply this knowledge to practical chemical engineering problems using process modelling and simulation.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use a range of routine skills, techniques and practices in engineering, mathematics and chemistry, including some advanced aspects
B2Use a range of routine skills, techniques and practices in chemical engineering
B3Carry out routine investigations into practical and theoretical issues.
B4Ability to use knowledge of chemical engineering to identify major hazards associated with a chemical process.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use a range of standard applications and instrumentation to obtain and process data
C2Apply and evaluate numerical and graphical procedures to laboratory and literature data
C3Present information in numerical, graphical and verbal forms to a variety of audiences

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information related to the main ideas and concepts within the discipline.
D2Use a variety of approaches to develop solutions to defined problems.
D3Display a critical evaluation of solutions and explanations of experimental data.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in defined professional activities
E2Take responsibility for work planning and time management within specified contexts
E3Co-operate in group working exercises
E4Work under guidance on current professional practice and issues

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8ENGG08022Chemical Engineering Fundamentals20check mark  
8ENGG08017Design Analysis 120 check mark 
8ENGG08021Introduction to Thermo-Fluids20 check mark 
8MATH08001Mathematics For Design20check mark  
8CHEM08001Physical Chemistry 220check mark  
8ENGG08024Process Modelling and Simulation20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9ENGG00001Sandwich Placement: Engineering40check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Rules for progression are as given in the university’s regulatory framework.
A Diploma in Higher Education Engineering is available in accordance with University regulations.
(At least 240 credits are required of which a minimum of 90 are at least SCQF level 8).
Progression to SCQF 9 is subject to academic advice and module prerequisites.
Refer to Regulation 3.13 regarding progression with credit deficit, note, the decision to permit a proceed with carry is not automatic but is subject to detailed discussion at the SBE.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad and integrated knowledge and understanding of major aspects of chemical engineering
A2Display a critical understanding of principal theories, concepts and terminologies of chemical engineering science.
A3Develop an integrated approach to chemical processing including safety, environmental issues, sustainability, economics and management.
A4Awareness of the importance of safe working practices and of risk assessment

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use a selection of skills, techniques and practices in handling chemical engineering concepts and experimental information
B2Display skills in selected equipment, techniques, practices and information at a specialised level in chemical engineering
B3Demonstrate ability to critically analyse a chemical process to identify the risks involved.
B4Practise routine and novel investigations and enquiries in chemical engineering

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Make formal and informal presentations on topics in chemical engineering by a variety of methods to a range of audiences
C2Use a range of IT applications to obtain and manage information and to process and present experimental data
C3Display the use of numerical and graphical procedures to interpret numerical information

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues in the discipline.
D2Identify and analyse routine professional problems and issues.
D3Make use of a range of sources in making judgments and decisions.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise some autonomy and initiative in dealing with activities at a professional level
E2Take some responsibility for the work of others and for the use of resources
E3Practise working in group exercises taking account of others’ roles and responsibilities.
E4Work under guidance on aspects of professional skills and ethical codes.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9ENGG09053Biochemical and Environmental Engineering20check mark  
9ENGG09037Chemical Process Principles20check mark  
9ENGG09049Computer Aided Process Analysis and Design20check markcheck mark 
9ENGG09036Process Design, Control and Safety20 check mark 
9ENGG09040Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer20check mark  
9ENGG09038Unit Operations 120 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
Students need to pass all core modules in order to progress to the final year of the BEng Hons programme

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9ENGG00001Sandwich Placement: Engineering40check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
All students undertaking the optional Industrial Placement year need to enrol on the module ENGG00001 (Sandwich Placement Engineering)

Criteria for Progression and Award

Rules for progression are as given in the university’s regulatory framework.
A BSc degree in Chemical Engineering is awarded subject to University regulations. (At least 360 credits are required with 200 in the subject area, of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF level 9).
If a student completes at least 36 weeks of work placed learning the student is eligible for the ‘sandwich award’ title.
Subject to the criteria specified in the Regulatory Framework, this award may be made with Distinction as per university regulations. A mean mark of 65% or above, or, a mean mark of at least 62% and a majority of the modules in the highest level of study at grade B1 or better, with no module graded at C.
Progression to SCQF 10 is subject to academic advice and module prerequisites.
Any student who has completed 360 credit points, 300 being in Engineering, and not as laid out above, may be entitled to exit with BSc Engineering, at the discretion of the SBE.


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Knowledge and critical understanding of a broad range of engineering principles and theories of the main areas of chemical engineering
A2Familiarity with the principles and applications of a range of modern design techniques and the ability to identify, define, and plan the steps necessary to design a chemical process and to carry out detailed design of process equipment
A3Knowledge of modern specialist topics in selected areas of chemical engineering, and awareness of major issues at the frontiers of chemical process development
A4Understanding of factors influencing the feasibility, design, commissioning and operation of chemical, process and biochemical plants including environmental and economic issues
A5Awareness of the structure of industrial organisations and economic environment in which they operate.
A6. Develop clear understanding of the importance of energy conservation and emissions reduction through knowledge of process integration and waste minimisation principles.
A7. Show evidence of the application of energy preservation principles in relation to the design process.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Practical skills in unit operations or reactor laboratory practice
B2The use of engineering software for the synthesis, design, analysis and evaluation of chemical processes
B3Investigative skills and planning of strategies in problem solving
B4Ability to use printed and other published materials as a learning resource
B5Execution of a defined programme of research / investigation / design

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Communicate effectively within a team or group, to a non-expert audience and to individuals using a variety of means
C2Information management skills, especially IT skills including on-line computer searches
C3The ability to use, interpret results, and communicate outcomes of variety of discipline specific IT products such as process simulators, process safety analysis, cost estimation, process integration, and thermal systems analysis software.
C4The ability to apply information technology to the design process.
C5The ability to use IT to facilitate collaboration and information sharing within the organisation as well as communication with clients and other stakeholders.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Development of rigour in investigation, evaluation and analysis
D2Synthesise information from a number of sources to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice
D3The ability to use analytical and modelling technique to describe and evaluate the performance of systems and processes.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Operate effectively in a group / team situation
E2Take responsibility for personal and professional learning and development
E3Management of time and prioritising of workloads

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10ENGG10031Chemical Engineering Design Study40check markcheck mark 
10ENGG10033Chemical Reactor Engineering20check mark  
10ENGG10084Energy Systems Analysis and Design20 check mark 
10ENGG10044Process Dynamics and Control20 check mark 
10ENGG10032Unit Operations 220check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
   

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Award

Standard University guidelines will be followed to decide on honours degree classification.
At least 480 credits are required with at least 240 in the subject area at SCQF level 9 and SCQF level 10 of which a minimum of at least 120 are at SCQF level 10, in line with PSRB requirements for an accredited degree.
Any student who fails to satisfy this criterion could be awarded a BSc Hons degree in Chemical Engineering subject to University regulations. (At least 480 credits are required with 200 in the subject area at SCQF level 9 and SCQF level 10 with a minimum of 100 at SCQF level 10 including all the core modules for the BSC Hons award). If a student completes at least 36 weeks of work placed learning the student is eligible for the ‘sandwich award’ title.


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework.

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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