University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2021/22

Last modified: 28/09/2020 16:22:59

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Physics with Nuclear Technology (Sandwich) Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Physics with Nuclear Technology (Sandwich)
BSc  Physics with Nuclear Technology (Sandwich)
Dip HE  Science
Cert HE  Science

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:Institute of Physics
Maximum Period of Registration:6 Years Full-time, 8 Years Part-time
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:John F. Smith

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Grades BBBB at Higher including Physics and Maths. English at least at standard grade.


or GCE

Grades BCC at A Level in Physics and Maths and including English at GCSE.

Grades BBB at A Level (including Physics and Maths) will normally qualify applicants for direct entry into the second year of the programme.


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

An appropriate HNC/HND award with the level of entry and/or credit awarded being subject to the content of the HN programme. Normally, suitably applicants with HNC
will qualify for direct entry into the second year of the programme and applicants
with HND will qualify for direct entry into the third year of the programme.


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applicants may also be considered with other academic, vocational or professional qualifications deemed to be equivalent.


Further desirable skills pre-application


General Overview

The BSc (Hons) (Sandwich) Physics with Nuclear Technology programme presents a unique opportunity for the students to study the core elements of Physics together whilst obtaining specialist knowledge and training in the area of Nuclear Technology. Physics and Nuclear Technology are experimental subjects dealing with fundamental concepts. Some of the individual modules that will be studied are focused on applied aspects at the interface of Physics and Nuclear Technology, incorporating the delivery of physics fundamentals whilst being underpinned by active research programmes in nuclear physics.

The distinct selection of modules meets the expectations of the QAA Subject Benchmarks for Physics and related criteria set out by the Institute of Physics. The Physics programme at UWS was accredited by the IOP in 2009. The Physics with Nuclear Technology programme will be included in the renewal of the accreditation in late 2011. The QAA document states: “Honours degrees should be awarded to students who have demonstrated: (1) A basic knowledge and understanding of physical laws and principles, and some application of these principles; (2) An ability to identify relevant principles and laws when dealing with problems; (3) The ability to execute and analyse the results of an experiment or investigation." This programme meets all of these criteria with a selection of Modules that are not only benchmarked with modern topics in physics research and on industry demands.

The programme includes in the first two years an intense study of the core principles of traditional physics - mechanics, heat, electromagnetism, waves, optics & electronics, modern physics. In addition, relevant modules in mathematics are provided and the student can chose an optional module. The third and fourth year focus on Nuclear Technology as well as core Physics. The Physic topics covered include atomic, nuclear and particle physics, special relativity, quantum mechanics, solid-state physics, electromagnetism and thermodynamics. Modules relating to Nuclear Technology include a Modules devoted to Imaging and Nuclear Medicine in third year, and Research Topics in Nuclear Physics and applications of Nuclear Physics in fourth year.

In the final year students perform project work in the nuclear-physics research group, or with a relevant project in one of the other UWS Physics research groups. Alternatively students may be able to carry out a placement in a local company. In this research-related feature of the delivery students should be able to gain a high degree of independence throughout their studies.

As such all Modules promote the evaluation of results and comparison with theoretical predictions or published data. The delivery of the programme is carried out by traditional lectures and laboratories. Small size tutorial classes are used to unfold learning outcomes and engender staff/student discussions. After graduation, students will be able to pursue scientific careers in the form of MSc or PhD qualifications. The student may start a career in the nuclear industry; this may be employment directly in the nuclear-power industry, or in one of the related sectors. Knowledge of Physics with specialist knowledge in the areas of Nuclear Technology will allow graduates to gain a competitive edge in the current competitive job market, especially since a successful sandwich-placement will give the student valuable experience in the nuclear industry or a related sector.

Teaching and learning methods employed on this programme include lectures, tutorial and problem classes, laboratory classes, project work, computer aided learning, textbooks, journals, and online resources including the Blackboard virtual learning environment. Assessment methods include examinations, essays, coursework, project reports, oral presentations, and problem sheets. Students are required to undertake significant amounts of self-study and independent learning in each module and assessment is via a mixture of coursework and final examination. Additional Contact Time All Physics staff practise an “open door policy” with regard to additional contact time for students. Small group tutorials are scheduled at all Levels in order to encourage student-staff interaction. A guideline to the content of the tutorials is presented below, level-by-level. Level 7: Tutorials are focussed on core scientific problems and a general introduction of students into Higher Education. Development of PDP skills such as critical evaluation of scientific concepts, mathematical and scientific skills, time management and core concepts of e-learning are also important. An introduction to core university regulations (e.g. plagiarism) is also provided. Level 8: Tutorials are focussed on problem solving, literature review and scientific writing, including an introduction to e-learning facilities in the university and the internet, and a continuation of PDP skills. Level 9: Tutorials will have a focus on advanced topics of modern physics, report writing and information retrieval using e-environment of university. Preparation for honours project-work is implicit. Advice and discussion of possible placement options can be given at this stage. PDP skills continue to develop, for example a discussion of interview skills. Level 10: Time can be scheduled for discussion of the project work. Contact time can be used for project one-to-one supervision and an introduction in specialist high-level aspects of PDP (e.g. career and small-finance planning). The normal period of registration for the BSc(Hons) Physics with Nuclear Technology programme is four years. Students should refer to Section 5.4 of the UWS Regulatory Framework for regulations regarding duration of study and authorised interruptions.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

Employability skills can be summarized as: a high level of technological expertise geared towards problem solving and project progress, numeracy, literacy, transferable skills with regard to computer use, project leadership, team work and management of peers, dissemination of scientific results. Graduates will have specialized knowledge and skills in the area of Nuclear Technology in addition to core Physics.

Timetabled PDP activities will be associated with some of the core modules in the programme, such as PHYS07005 Skills for Physics in first year, and PHYS10003 Project and Professional Skills in fourth year.

The employability skills which students will gain during the sandwich placement will be those identified by The Council for Industry and Higher Education (CIHE) (2006) as the key competencies which employers value as defined below.

Cognitive Skills (attention to detail, analysis and judgement)

Demonstrate the use of their knowledge, understanding the skills, in both identifying and analysing problems and issues and formulating, evaluations and applying evidence-based solutions and arguments; undertake critical analysis, evaluation and/or synthesis of ideas, concepts information and issued; identify and analyse routine professional problems and issues; draw on a range of sources in making judgements

Generic competencies (planning & organisation, influencing, written communication, questioning, listening, teamwork, interpersonal sensitivity, organisation sensitivity and lifelong learning and development)

Well developed skills for the gathering, evaluation, analysis and presentation of information, ideas, concepts and quantitative and/or qualitative data, drawing on a wide range of current sources. This will include the use of ICT as appropriate to the subject; Communication of the results of their own and other work accurately and reliably in a range of different contents using the main specialist concepts, constructs and techniques of the subject; Identifying and addressing their own learning needs including being able to draw on a range of current research, development and professional materials; Interpreting, using and evaluating numerical and graphical data to achieve goals targets; Making formal and informal presentations on standard/mainstream topics in the subject/discipline to a range of audiences; Work under guidance with qualified practitioners; Practice in ways which take account of own and others’ roles and responsibilities; Take some responsibility for the work or others and for a range of resources.

Personal capabilities (creativity, decisiveness, initiative, adaptability/flexibility, achievement orientation, tolerance for stress and leadership)

Application of their subject and transferable skills to contexts where criteria for decisions and the scope of the task may be well defined but where personal responsibility, initiative and decision-making is also required; Exercising autonomy and initiative in some activities at a professional level.

Technical Ability (knowledge of key trends in modern technology and experience of using modern technology)

Use of a range of IT applications to support and enhance work.

Practical and professional elements (professional expertise, process operation and image)

Show familiarity and competence in the use of routine materials, practices and skills and of a few that are more specialised, advanced and complex; practise in a range of professional level contexts which include a degree of unpredictability; deal with ethical and professional issued in accordance with current professional and/or ethical codes or practices, seeking guidance where appropriate.
 

We have defined a set of Graduate Attributes that are the skills, personal qualities and understanding to be developed through your university experience that will prepare for life and work in the 21st century (https://www.uws.ac.uk/current-students/your-graduate-attributes/). The Graduate Attributes relevant to this module are listed below.

Academic: critical thinker; analytical; inquiring; knowledgeable; digitally literate; problem solver; autonomous; incisive; innovative

Personal: effective communicator; influential; motivated

Professional: collaborative; research-minded; enterprising; ambitious; driven

 

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

All students on the programme will take the 40-credit point Module at Level 10 (4th year) entitled Project and Professional Skills. Students will have the opportunity to carry out their projects outside of the university at, for example, local relevant companies or hospitals.This will provide the opportunity for credit-bearing work-related learning.

Students on the BSc (Hons) (Sandwich) Physics with Nuclear Technology will have the opportunity for a one-year placement in industry or a research institution in the UK or abroad. The Physics staff will be happy to initiate contacts with known providers of sandwich placements. Details will depend on the chosen project.

The sandwich placement is primarily designed for students to gain work experience. The experience may also contribute towards meeting the membership requirements of a professional body. Students carrying out a sandwich placement are required to continue their PDP programme and to maintain a portfolio from which they will be required to produce a comprehensive “learning log report” charting their development during placement. This is assessed on a pass/fail basis only with the majority of ongoing assessment being formative in nature. The student will be required, through reflection,
to explore their own role within their placement organisation and to take account of the roles and responsibilities of themselves and others in the context of the structure in which they operate. On successful completion of the placement, the student will be more employable as a result of having developed their ability to integrate essential generic skills and attributes with subject-related knowledge.

The placement will be governed by a tripartite learning agreement between the student, placement provider and the university. The agreement will define the learning outcomes and confirm elements of support and commitment from all parties. The agreement will be signed by each party prior to the start of the placement and it is expected that Schools will continue to use their existing placement systems for the management of such agreements.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the placement the student will be able to:

• L1 Critically relate elements of the placement work experience to the main themes and issues of academic student of physics relevant within the workplace and be confident in articulating this to others.

• L2 Analyse organisational cultures and structures with particular relevance to the current workplace and exhibit the ability to critically evaluate employee roles in an applied setting.

• L3 Recognise, critically assess and be able to clearly demonstrate to others the personal development and application of essential employability skills and attributes within a real work situation.

Assessment

Assessment will be based on pass/fail only and all assessment elements must be passed for progression as part of the Sandwich programme. Assignments will be open to external examiners in accordance with university regulations.

In order to submit for assessment students need to:

• Attend the workplace(s) in which they have been placed for a minimum total of 36 weeks (180 full working days) and have their employer(s) confirm their attendance.

• Receive a satisfactory assessment of work performance from their workplace supervisor(s) and academic tutor (based on two interviews and other evidence as required).

• Maintain a PDP portfolio and use this to submit a satisfactory “learning log report” reflecting on the placement experience (minimum 2,000 words).

• Successfully complete a subject related project (minimum 3,000 words or equivalent).

Where a student’s sandwich placement is made up of two separate planned periods of work experience (i.e. a “Thin Sandwich”), the PDP portfolio report and subject related report will normally be submitted and assessed during the second period of placement.


Assessment of the first period of placement will relate to satisfactory performance in the workplace.

Extenuating circumstances will be taken into consideration in accordance with University regulations.

Reassessment

• Minimum period in work: It is essential that the student completes at least 36 weeks (180 working days) in employment. If the student does not meet this minimum requirement then they cannot pass the placement.

• Catch up: Where through no fault of their own a student has been unable to attain at least 36 weeks placement experience they will be entitled to secure the additional work experience required through a suitable additional period of work experience provided this is agreed in advance with the Programme Team.

• Retake of Placement: a repeat or alternative placement will only be considered on health or other mitigating grounds or where the placement is terminated due to no fault of the student. In such cases the student will receive counselling from the placement tutor on how best to proceed.

• Satisfactory Performance: The first interview will be used to assess the student’s progress. If it is considered that the student’s performance is less than expected at that stage, the student will be advised of this and of the elements of their performance that need to improve. If the student’s performance is assessed as unsatisfactory at the second interview then the student will be given further advice on the steps they need to take to achieve a satisfactory assessment and will be reassessed through a third interview at the end of their placement period. Interviews will normally be conducted within the workplace unless a suitable alternative method is agreed by all parties.

• Reflective Report from PDP: If the reflective report is unsatisfactory, the student will be given the opportunity to resubmit in line with University regulations.

• Subject related report: If the subject related report is unsatisfactory the student will be given the opportunity to resubmit in line with University regulations.

Progression/Award

• Placement students will be assigned to a specific Subject and Programme Panel.

• The relevant Programme Panel will consider the performance of each sandwich placement student enrolled on that Programme and decide eligibility for reassessment, progression and awards in accordance with University Regulations, in particular Regulation 7.10.4

• A student who fails the sandwich placement after reassessment will no longer be eligible for a “with sandwich” award. They will either progress to level 9 or 10 (as appropriate) of a non-sandwich equivalent programme or exit with an equivalent non-sandwich award.
 

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad general knowledge of the Physics topics covered (mechanics, electromagnetism, waves, heat, gravitation, modern physics) and core mathematics
A2To apply knowledge and understanding to solve relevant numerical and non-numerical problems
A3Record simple experimental procedures in individual work

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use the skills of observation, recording of measurements and problem solving in both theoretical and practical situations
B2Use skills to plan and perform small scientific projects in the laboratory
B3Use some of the basic and routine professional skills, techniques and practices

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use a range of forms of communication, both spoken and written
C2Use graphical and numerical skills in combination
C3Be able to summarise and present scientific individual work effort for critical peer evaluation

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Use a range of approaches to address problems in a routine context within Physics
D2Critical analysis of obtained experimental data
D3Present and evaluate arguments, information and ideas in physics
D4Use a range of numerical and graphical skills in combination

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise initiative and independence in practical situations
E2Work in partnership with others in practical classes, taking account of each other’s roles and responsibilities
E3Work with others in support of current professional practise under tutorial guidance

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7PHYS07006Introductory Physics A20check mark  
7MATH07003Mathematics of Space & Change20check mark  
7PHYS07005Skills for Physics20check mark  
7PHYS07007Introductory Physics B20 check mark 
7MATH07009Mathematics of Space & Change 220 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
Any level 7 module   Tri 2
7PHYS07008Introductory Astronomy20 check mark Recommended Option

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression to level SCQF 8 is available to students who fulfil the university progression requirements and who have obtained at least a C pass in each of the core modules at SCQF 7.
A student may exit with an award of Cert HE Science, with a minimum of 120 credit points.


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of physics at the appropriate level, with detailed knowledge in some areas
A2Demonstrate understanding of a limited range of core theories, principles and concepts

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Carry out routine investigations in a lab situation
B2Adapt routine practices within accepted standards

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Convey complex information on a topic to an audience
C2Use a range of applications to obtain, process and interpret data

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Understanding core issues of depicted physics problems
D2Solving of smaller scale theoretical and hand-on laboratory work problems

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Work in close partnership with peers on problems

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8PHYS08007Classical Mechanics and Special Relativity20check mark  
8PHYS08002Optics & Electronics20check mark  
8PHYS08006Mathematics for Physicists20check mark  
8PHYS08003Oscillations, Waves & Fields20 check mark 
8PHYS08004Properties of Matter20 check mark 
8PHYS08008Mathematics for Physicists 220   

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression to level SCQF 9 is available to students who fulfil the university progression requirements and who have obtained at least a C pass in each of the core modules at SCQF 8. A student may exit with award Dip. HE Science, with a minimum of 240 credit points.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad and integrated knowledge and understanding of the main areas of Physics and Nuclear Technology (quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics,
special relativity, thermodynamics and statistical physics, Particle, electromagnetism, imaging & nuclear medicine, applied nuclear technology)
A2Demonstrate a critical evaluation of modern day physics knowledge

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Practise routine methods of enquiry in a lab setting, including topics with a degree of unpredictability
B2Use information retrieval system present at the university for further reading and understanding of modern day physics concepts
B3Discuss outcomes in detail with peers and supervisors

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Write formal reports which include elements of interpretation and evaluation of numerical data
C2Be able to make a formal presentation on a topic as a member of a group
C3Be able to lead own project

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis; evaluate information and synthesise ideas
D2Benchmark own findings with standard results as depicted in modern day physics
D3Critical evaluate sources of uncertainties and limits of modern day physics understanding

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in practical classes and in intermediate problem solving exercises
E2Work with others in a group to produce a presentation of intermediate level

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9PHYS09011Atoms & Nuclei20 check mark 
9PHYS09003Electromagnetism20check mark  
9PHYS09009Imaging & Nuclear Medicine20 check mark 
9PHYS09008Quantum Mechanics20check mark  
9PHYS09007Thermodynamics & Statistical Physics20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9PHYS09012Mathematics for Physicists 320   
OR   
Any other other 20-credit L8/9/10 module   Trimester 1

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression to level SCQF 10 is available to students who fulfil the university progression requirements and who have obtained at least a C pass in each of the core modules at SCQF 9. Students may, subject to availability, be able to undertake a sandwich placement for one academic year, before proceeding to SCQF level 10.


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate knowledge that integrates the principle topics in advanced physics at the required level (project, advanced topics in experimental and theoretical physics)
A2Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of at least one specialism

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Execute a defined project of research or investigation and identify relevant outcomes
B2Use a range of skills and practices associated with a specialist area of study

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Make a formal presentation on a specialised topic to an informed audience
C2Be able to defend own project results under peer scrutiny
C3Be able to communicate with peers and senior colleagues

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Be able to make judgements where data is limited, in a practical or theoretical situation
D2Critically identify, define and analyse complex physics problems and issues

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in practical classes and in advanced problem solving exercises
E2Work with others in a group to produce a presentation of advanced level

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10PHYS10012Applications of Nuclear Physics20 check mark 
10PHYS10001Nuclear & Particle Physics20check mark  
10PHYS10003Project & Professional Skills40check markcheck mark 
10PHYS10010Research Topics in Nuclear Physics20check mark  
10PHYS10009Solid State Physics20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Award

Students will exit with an award of BSc (Hons) Physics with Nuclear Technology with a minimum of 480 points. Students who have done a sandwich year will be entitled to BSc (Hons) (Sandwich) Physics with Nuclear Technology. Honours degrees are classified in accordance with University regulations


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



Version Number: 1.10