University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2021/22

Last modified: 25/06/2021 09:25:15

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Professional Health Studies Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Professional Health Studies
BSc  Professional Health Studies
Dip HE  Professional Health Studies

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:
Maximum Period of Registration:
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Ayr
Dumfries
Lanarkshire
Paisley
Distance/Online Learning
London

School:School of Health and Life Sciences
Programme Leader:Elaine Stevens

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications


or GCE


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland (UWS) as specified in Chapter 2 of the current University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

For direct admission to Scottish Credit and Qualification Framework (SCQF) level 8 applicants will normally have 120 credits at level 7 from a health-related HNC or equivalent. Applicants holding an HNC of 96 credits will be admitted with advanced standing.

For direct entry to SCQF level 9 applicants will normally have 240 points, at least 100 points of which are at SCQF level 8 or above. This will be from a health related HND, DipHE or equivalent.

For direct entry to SCQF level 10 applicants will normally have 360 points, which is equivalent to a Scottish Bachelor award. This should be in a health- related subject such as Health Studies, Nursing, Paramedic Science or equivalent.


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applicants will normally have some experience in a health or social care related role. This may have been as part of previous learning, as an employee or a volunteer.

Consideration will be given to applicants who have gained previous academic credit within the last 5 years, where continued development in knowledge through academic studies or professional development demonstrates currency in certified learning.

Students wishing direct entry to SCQF level 10 must also provide evidence of completion of a research module at SCQF level 9 or equivalent. If there is no evidence of completion of such learning then students will have to complete the SCQF level 9 module “Critical Research Appraisal” as part of their learning at SCQF level 10.

As per current UWS regulations all applicants must have the language and literacy skills to understand and use the written materials utilised in the learning and teaching of the programme and be able to communicate clearly and accurately in spoken and written English.

For all programmes of the University, except for International Foundation, research and doctoral programmes a minimum IELTS comparable score of 6.0 or above (with a minimum of 5.5 in each component) is acceptable as evidence of proficiency in English. All International students are required to meet English Language requirements outlined by UWS, with the exception of:
• Native Speakers of English (as defined by the UKVI),
• Erasmus students (unless advised otherwise),
• Non-Erasmus students from EU partner institutions (you may provide a statement from your institution confirming English language ability in place of a formal qualification).


Further desirable skills pre-application

Digital skills, particularly the ability to use word processing programmes, internet browsers and online teaching and learning platforms, are essential for all students as modules are delivered either fully online or as blended learning. All modules include electronic submission of assessments.


General Overview

General Overview

This programme has been developed to enable those who wish to develop a career in health and social care to gain a Scottish honours degree by offering a wide range of generic and subject specific academic modules that are relevant to modern care practices (Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA), 2019). This may be those who currently work in the sector as well as those who are planning to do so. Embedded within curriculum development are the objectives of the Education Enabling Plan (UWS, 2018) which recognise the importance of flexibly delivered, partnership learning and the exchange of research and knowledge between teachers and students.

The list of award titles is outlined below:

BSc (Hons) Professional Health Studies;

BSc Professional Health Studies;

Dip HE in Professional Health Studies.

There is also recognition that students in health and social care should have access to flexible learning experiences that clearly relate to their caring role and continuing professional development. Thus, the programme design reflects current health and social care delivery where the needs of individuals are increasingly being met by a broad range of services working in partnership to deliver safe, effective, person-centred and values-based care (QAA, 2019). In addition, the programme and its modules have been developed using current strategies, policies and standards for a range of health and social care workers. E.g. World Health Organisation (2013) Transforming and Scaling Up Health Professionals’ Education and Training, Skills for Health (2010) Code of Conduct for Health Care Support Workers in Adult Health and Social Care in England, Scottish Government (2017) 2030 Nursing; A Vision for Nursing in Scotland, Department of Health (2004) NHS Knowledge Skills Framework (NHSKSF). This approach to programme development offers the potential to enhance student employability and career development as they progress through its spiral curriculum, which is defined as:

“one in which there is iterative revisiting of topics, subjects or themes throughout the course…it is not simply repetition of the topic taught. It required the deepening of it with each successful encounter building on the previous one.” (Harden and Stamper, 1999, pp. 141).

The target market for this programme includes a range of health and social care workers such as holistic therapists, support workers, nurses, social workers, paramedics, operating department personnel and other allied health professionals such as occupational therapists, physiotherapists and counsellors as well as those aspiring to work in the sector. Students from Scotland, the UK, Europe and the wider world have the ability to take this programme through blended learning and by full online learning (utilising contemporary educational technology). To maximise flexibility, the programme may also be delivered on both a fulltime and part time basis. Flexibility of delivery is a key objective in ensuring the future care workforce is suitably equipped to provide safe and effective care.

The development of professional and graduate skills and attributes, within a spiral curriculum, is an essential feature of the programme and throughout their period of study students will be enabled to become I AM UWS graduates who are universal, work ready and successful and who are prepared for life and work in the 21st century. To achieve this the programme will develop students’ academic and professional knowledge and skills, and their personal qualities and characteristics to allow them to work well in a team that supports people with a range of health or social care needs. The QAA (2019) health benchmark statements, global, national and local health and social care strategies and the Four Pillars of Practice (clinical practice, facilitation of learning, leadership and evidence, research and development) (NHS Education Scotland, 2015) were employed in the development of the spiral curriculum to ensure the aims and themes of the programme are aligned to contemporary educational standards and frameworks in what is becoming an ever-complex care environment. Consequently, in each year of study the content of individual modules re-explores generic health and social care concepts from a deeper viewpoint as well as introducing new ideas and to allow students to challenge existing views on contemporary issues affecting complex care from a range of perspectives. In doing so, students will develop the graduate attributes and employability skills required to develop professionally, so they can help shape global, national and local health and social care provision.

In order to facilitate this process, all modules within the programme are grouped under three clear themes:

Theme1: Research Skill Development,
Theme 2: Professional Development,
Theme 3: Contemporary Healthcare Issues.

To support the spiral curriculum, students are encouraged to undertake a minimum of one module from each of the themes at each academic level. That is, a research focussed module, a professional development module and a contemporary healthcare module. By participating in at least one module from each grouping, a more holistic approach to the acquisition of graduate skills is supported and built upon during programme participation.

Throughout the programme students will be encouraged to, engage in lifelong learning, develop role enhancing enquiry skills, and appreciate the value of education for themselves and for wider society. This will assist the student in developing the skills they require for autonomous practice, team-working and meeting the complex care needs of an aging population (NES, 2015; World Health Organisation, 2014). Due to the diverse nature of this programme some modules require students to be working with certain client groups. This is outlined in individual module descriptors.

In keeping with the UWS internationalisation agenda the programme is designed to be attractive to local, national and international students and encourages them to consider contemporary health and social care theories and then apply these to their local context and culture, thus developing global citizens. By the end of the programme graduates will have the ability to identify and propose solutions to problems which capitalise on the potential for health and care improvements for patients, clients, residents, and wider groups; through the development of health improvement strategies at individual, organisational and wider societal levels.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

The I am UWS Graduate Attributes were created to reflect the diverse nature of our institution and to allow for customisation and adaptation by different Schools, subject areas, programmes and levels of study, in addition to use by professional services and the Students’ Association in supporting extra-curricular based experiences.

The UWS graduates are:

Universal - globally relevant with comprehensively applicable abilities, skills and behaviours,

Work ready - dynamic and prepared for employment in complex, ever-changing environments which require lifelong learning and resilience,

Successful - as a UWS graduate with a solid foundation on which to continue succeeding and realising my potential, across various contexts.

This programme recognises the importance of the UWS graduate attributes and is designed to develop graduates with in-depth knowledge of contemporary health and social care practices at a global, national and local context (Work Ready and Universal). The programme will enhance students’ future career prospects by creating opportunities and challenges for to enable them to understand and evaluate current care practices to ensure these are safe, effective, compassionate and person-centred (Work Ready and Successful). The programme will develop students’ analytical knowledge and skills in interpreting the role of care policies and practices in different social economic environments (Successful and Universal).

Within the School of Health and Life Sciences, all modules and programmes endorse a learner-centred approach which supports and enables the student to take responsibility for the planning and development of their own learning and career development. PDP is embedded within all modules, with clearly articulated links to module learning outcomes. Subject benchmarks, Professional Standards such as Skills for Health, The Nursing and Midwifery Council and The Health and Care Professions Council and the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework level descriptors are utilised to develop students already working in health and social care as well as those who aspire to do so in a future career.

The opportunity to engage in a process of PDP, including support and guidance in the development of a reflective approach to PDP activities, is supported through the School's Personal Tutoring System. The Personal Tutoring System as integral to ensuring student confidence, resilience and attainment. All PDP activities within this programme are supported by every student being allocated a Personal Tutor (PT) at enrolment. The PT will provide the student with feedback on their engagement with PDP and respond to feedback from the students about the effectiveness of PDP support provided by the School. Feedback is designed to feed forward for the student’s module assignments and final submissions. Building on this practice, a student could reflect that they have an area of weakness or attribute for which they have no evidence of development and the Personal Tutor could assist them to identify a particular module(s) which could meet this identified deficit, which will give the student the best opportunity to improve/gather evidence of achievement.

Consequently, student success is at the heart of the programme. The programme team will support students to achieve success and encourage them to develop a proactive attitude towards their professional development, allowing them to build a successful career in health and social care.  As each student progresses through the programme, they have opportunities to engage in PDP through timetabled and other modular activities. These activities are designed to help students recognise and evidence their development of skills such as academic writing, critical discussion and analytical thinking. By providing a ‘holistic’ approach to PDP students are helped to see the link between theory and practice

In relation to employability, there are opportunities to enhance students' employability in terms of the development of care skills, leadership skills, management skills and teaching skills. The relationship between employability and learning is made explicit through the development of a range of learning, teaching and assessment approaches. Effective engagement with the PDP process and support made available by the School provides students with the evidence and understanding of how their learning relates to their. In addition, students can be supported in this respect by Careers Advisers from the UWS Careers and Employability Service (see http://www.uws.ac.uk/employability/).

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

For modules within the programme that require an element of work-based learning all students will already be working in an appropriate environment. Individual module descriptors will advise students if this is required. All students will be supported in practice by the appropriate module co-ordinator. In some modules a specific workplace supervisor is required who will participate in the assessment process but responsibility for the grading of the final assessment lies with UWS academic staff. Individual module descriptors will alert students if a supervisor is required.

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

For the purposes of this programme, this equates to the following:

Students must engage with all elements of teaching and learning, including attending face to face and online classes/tutorials, taking part in other online learning activities and submitting all assessments. Students who do not engage fully will be supported via the School's non-engagement procedure.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate an understanding of the contemporary determinants of health and wellbeing, how these affect people’s reactions to ill health and the delivery of health and social care at global, national and levels;
A2Explain the importance of evidence-based care delivery and professional development;
A3Display knowledge and understanding of the principles professionalism and how this impacts on care delivery.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply the theories of health and social care delivery to the care and support of people with a range of physical, social, psychological and emotional issues;
B2Demonstrate the importance of professional relationships and inter-professional team working and how these are applied to health and social care;
B3Evaluate a range of evidence and consider its relevance to the delivery of care globally, nationally and locally.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use a range of information technology applications to convey information to a range of audiences and for a range of purposes;
C2Display academic skills that enables clear and considered written comparisons to be made within and between healthcare systems and modes of care delivery;
C3Use and evaluate numerical and graphical data in relation to the safe and effective delivery of care globally, nationally and locally.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Use a problem-solving approach to demonstrate the changing nature of health and social care delivery and how safe and effective care can be maintained globally, nationally and locally;
D2Identify self-management skills in the development study and research exercises;
D3Evaluate the implementation of an individualised, values-based approach to the delivery of care.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Demonstrate an element of autonomous thinking and working within a multi-professional team care environment;
E2Apply quality and professional principles and standards to ensure the maintenance of high quality care at international, national and local levels;
E3Demonstrate the application of legal and ethical principles and frameworks when caring and supporting people with a ranges of needs.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8HLTH08005Contemporary and Global Issues in Health20   
8HLTH08001Evidence, Research and Academic Skills20   
8HLTH08002Health and Wellbeing Across the Lifespan20   
8HLTH08006The Psychology of Health and Wellbeing20   

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
Any other suitable module from the university catalogue subject to timetabling restrictions, pre-requisite requirements and in agreement with the programme leader   
8HLTH08004Fundamentals and Professionalism in Health20   
8HLTH08003Working in Health and Social Care20   

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

On completion of Level 8 and in accordance with UWS Regulatory Framework students can progress to Level 9. Having successfully passed all SCQF level 8 modules students may exit the programme with the award of Diploma in Higher Education Professional Health Studies.

If a student fails an option module they can make up their credit deficit by taking, at their own cost, an alternative module from the wider university catalogue.

Where 220 credits have been achieved and one core module has been failed and results in the named award being unachievable, the option to continue towards the award of Dip HE Combined Studies by selecting once only, a single module from the School’s L8 module portfolio (as advised by the Programme Leader) will be permitted.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Acquire a deeper knowledge of the social, scientific and human dimensions of health issues through using relevant global theoretical and conceptual knowledge;
A2Demonstrate critical understanding of international, national and local contemporary health and social care issues and their location within broader social, political, legal and economic contexts;
A3Recognise the need for continuing professional development and the obligation to maintain up-to-date knowledge and skills;
A4Demonstrate a broad and integrated knowledge of the principles of inter-professional working and how this affects global citizenship.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Adapt and improve practice within a dynamic evidence based framework that is applicable to practice regardless of work or geographical area;
B2Determine the needs of patients/clients/residents and their wider support network using professional and validated assessment methods;
B3Apply a range of appropriate skills to the care of patients/clients/residents and their wider support network;
B4Evaluate the impact of care on patients/clients/residents and their wider support network.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Consolidate effective communication skills evidenced in oral and written presentations;
C2Examine evidence-based databases for relevant data related to the care of specific client groups;
C3Use a range of ICT applications to analyse and report on health and social care delivery and its outcomes effectively;
C4Effectively evaluate communication with patients, carers, professionals in different settings across the world.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Critically analyse and evaluate the changing nature of multi-professional health and social care delivery in a global environment;
D2Identify and analyse issues within the workplace and have the ability to influence change;
D3Critically analyse and develop best practice through quality assurance strategies;
D4Develop and refine self-management in the planning and execution of study and research exercises.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Reflect on, and in, action to ensure care provision reflects current best practice globally and is of the highest possible standard;
E2Apply the principles of clinical governance to ensure the maintenance of standards of care;
E3Acquire multi-disciplinary perspectives on health and social care related issues across the world through the study of academic disciplines drawn from the natural and the social sciences;
E4Demonstrate leadership in the application of up-to-date care skills and the prioritisation of care with junior colleagues and other professionals;
E5Perform effectively with other professionals within multi-disciplinary agencies and teams.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9NURS09002Critical Research Appraisal20check markcheck markcheck mark

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9NURS09205An Introduction to Palliative Care20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
9NURS09164Diabetes Management20check markcheck markcheck mark*
9NURS09206Essentials of bladder and bowel care20check markcheck mark *
9NURS09207Essentials of Cancer Care20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
9NURS09229Essentials of Dementia Care20 check markcheck mark*L/P
9NURS09030Infection Control in Practice20check markcheck markcheck mark*
9NURS09177Long Term Condition Management20check markcheck mark *L/P
9NURS09214Obesity, Weight Management and Lifestyle20 check mark *
9NURS09122Pain Management20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
9NURS09227Professionalism in Health and Social Care10check mark  *L/P
9NURS09145Quality Improvement & Safety in Care20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
Subject to academic guidance and programme learning outcome fit, students may access appropriate additional option modules from the School of Health and Life Sciences module catalogue. For example: Mentorship, Non-medical Prescribing, Prescribing V150 and Positive Practice in Advanced Dementia Care.   
9NURS09179Supporting People Facing Loss20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
9NURS09208Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy Administration20check markcheck mark **
9NURS09220The Principles of Haematology20   *
9NURS09228The Proactive Learner10check mark  *L/P
9NURS09165Therapeutic Communication20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
9NURS09210Tissue Viability and Wound Care20check mark check mark*

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
* To enable flexible delivery for emerging markets these modules may run in more than one trimester. However for the “normal” delivery of the programme each module is likely to run once per year.

** This module has additional entry criteria which are presented in the module descriptor. This means that such modules cannot be options for all students within the programme.

L/P Students studying the programme full time in London and/or Paisley will study these modules.

Subject to academic guidance and programme learning outcome fit, students may access appropriate additional option modules from the School of Health and Life Sciences module catalogue. For example: Mentorship, Non-medical Prescribing, Prescribing V150 and Positive Practice in Advanced Dementia Care.

Criteria for Progression and Award

Students Exiting with a Scottish Bachelor’s Degree.
To be eligible for the award of BSc Professional Health Studies students must have successfully completed a minimum of three 20 point modules at SCQF Level 9 from the UWS portfolio of modules related to the award title. This includes successful completion of the core module “Critical Research Appraisal” or a recognised equivalent to that module. Overall, students will have gained 360 credits of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF level 9 or above to be eligible for the award of BSc Professional Health Studies.

To gain a “with distinction” award the current regulatory criteria need to be met by candidates at their first attempt and confirmed at Programme Assessment Board (PAB). Refer to current UWS Regulatory Framework for further guidance.

In order to progress to the honours award at SCQF level 10 students must meet the admission criteria and credit minima set out in the current UWS Regulatory Framework. I.e. 360 credits, of which a minimum of 90 are at SCQF level 9 or above.

Exceptionally, where 340 credit has been achieved and the core module has been failed which results in the named award being unachievable, the option to continue towards the award of BSc Combined Studies by selecting once only, a single module from the School’s L9 module portfolio (as advised by the Programme Leader) will be permitted.


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate an advanced and integrated knowledge and understanding that encompasses the principal areas, features, boundaries, terminology and conventions of global health and social care;
A2Deliver an advanced critical understanding of the key theories, concepts and principles within global health and social care;
A3Present detailed knowledge and understanding of one or more specialisms in health and social care;
A4Use research skills and enquiry techniques to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the ways in which health and social care practices are developed across the world.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Exhibit competency in identifying, selecting and utilising all of the key skills associated with global health and social care and apply these to one’s own sphere of practice;
B2Use a range of skills, practices and theories which are specialised to the student’s field of practice;
B3Execute a defined project of applying the theories form an extended literature review to an area of health and social care;
B4Experience a range of professional situations that include a degree of unpredictability and/or specialism within more complex care arenas.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Convey informally or formally newly gained knowledge to a range of professionals within the team and other agencies;
C2Communicate with peers, senior colleagues and specialists at a professional level;
C3Make use of range of ICT application to retrieve information in the pursuit of learning that can enhance the overall outcomes of care;
C4Interpret, use and evaluate a wide range of data to achieve identified goals.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Illustrate some originality and creativity in dealing with professional issues;
D2Offer professional insights, interpretations and solutions to problems and issues from across the world;
D3Critically review and consolidate knowledge, skills and practices and thinking in relation to global health and social care;
D4Make judgments related to current thinking in practice where data/information is limited and thinking in the area comes from a range of sources.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in professional activities;
E2Practice in ways that show awareness of own and other’s roles and responsibilities from different spheres of practice and geographical locations;
E3Work with others to bring about change, developments and/or new thinking;
E4Deal with complex ethical and professional issues in accordance with current professional and ethical practices from across the world.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10NURS10024The Honours Dissertation40check markcheck mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10NURS10010Effective Teaching in Practice20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
10NURS10011eHealth:Assessment from a Distance20check markcheck markcheck mark*
10NURS10028Improving Population Health L1020check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
10NURS10014Leadership in Health and Social Care20check markcheck markcheck mark*L/P
10MIDW10011Supporting Families20   **

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
*May be available in each trimester to meet market demands but in general will only be delivered once per year.

** will only be utilised for students who have a 20 credit deficit at the end of the honours year.

L/P The fulltime students on the UWS London Campus and Paisley Campus will access these modules. Such students may also access one L9 module to complete their award.

Criteria for Award

To be eligible to for the award of honours degree of BSc Professional Health Studies (SCQF level 10) students must have gained all their credit (either 120 points at SCQF level 10 or 100 at level 10 and 20 at SCQF level 9) within this programme. See the current UWS regulatory Framework for further guidance. In addition all students must also successfully complete the SCQF level 10 core dissertation module. There are no other core modules in the honours year pathway.

The minimum criterion for the award of Honours degrees is a grade of C or above in each of the modules studied at SCQF level 10 or in the final year stage of the programme (none less than SCQF Level 9). Where a student has undertaken a resit in one or more modules at SCQF level 10 or in the final year stage of the programme, then the resit mark will stand on the student’s academic record but a mark of 40% and grade C will be used in the classification of the Honours award. See the current UWS Regulatory Framework for further information.


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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