University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2022/23

Last modified: 23/07/2022 17:20:10

Named Award Title:BSc (Hons) Mathematics Single

Award Title for Each Award: BSc (Hons)  Mathematics
BSc  Mathematics
Dip HE  Mathematics
Cert HE  Mathematics

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:
Maximum Period of Registration:8 years
Mode of Study:Full Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:Dr Alan J Walker

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Year 1: HIGHERS: BBBC including Mathematics plus English at SCQF Level 5 (e.g. National 5, Standard Grade (Grade 3 or above), Intermediate 2).

Year 2: ADVANCED HIGHERS: CCD including Mathematics plus English at SCQF Level 5 (e.g. National 5, Standard Grade (Grade 3 or above), Intermediate 2).


or GCE

Year 1: A-LEVEL: CCC including Mathematics plus GCSE (Grade C or above) in English.

Year 2: A-LEVEL: BBC including Mathematics plus GCSE (Grade C or above) English.


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

Year 1: relevant HNC, which includes Higher National Unit: Engineering Mathematics 1 (H7K0 33).

Year 2: relevant HND, which includes Higher National Units: Engineering Mathematics 2 (H7K1 34) and Engineering Mathematics 3 (H7K2 34).


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Year 1: Irish Leaving Certificate: BBBC2 including Mathematics or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma: 26 points (including Mathematics plus two other subjects at Higher level).

Year 2: BTEC Extended Diploma: DDM, Scottish Baccalaureate in Science: Advanced entry to Year 2 will be dependent on subjects studied and grade of award or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma: 30 points including Mathematics, four subjects to be at Higher level.


Further desirable skills pre-application

A willingness to learn, engage, and work closely with academics and peers alike.


General Overview

Mathematics, known as the Queen of the Sciences, is concerned with the description and logic of shape, quantity, change, and arrangement. This BSc (Hons) Mathematics programme presents how mathematics underpins and describes the ever-changing world around us.

This programme will provide a broad understanding of key areas of mathematics with options to individualise the content at every level. Further, it is designed to fulfil the requirements of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Mathematics, Statistics and Operational Research (MSOR) (2015) and takes cognizance of the Bond Review in 2018 (The Era of Mathematics).

The overall aim of the programme is to develop individuals with a range of transferable graduate skills, who will acquire Honours-level knowledge and skills in Mathematics. Students electing to take the relevant options at Levels 9 and 10 will also acquire Honours-level knowledge and skills in Statistics.

The programme offers the fundamentals of Mathematics and Statistics as core science. Presentations, group exercises and computer laboratory sessions develop applied practical and communication skills, preparing students for excelling in the 21st Century workplace.

Across the four years of the programme, increasingly complex understanding of Mathematics and Statistics, viz. Algebra, Calculus, Probability & Statistics, is developed. At later stages in the programme, students choose to study topics from a range of options including statistics, finance, coding and cryptography, numerical analysis, and mathematical biology.

At each level, students have the option to study modules in other disciplines, preferably Chemistry, Computing, or Physics. Examples of such choices at Level 7 can be found below. This allows for the broadening of the educational experience and an opportunity for students to interact with peers in other disciplines.

In accordance with the relevant benchmarks, graduates should be able to demonstrate:

  • a sound understanding of the basic body of knowledge for the course of study, normally including calculus and linear algebra;
  • the attainment of a suitable level of skill in calculation and manipulation within this basic body of knowledge and some capability to solve problems formulated within it;
  • the application of core concepts and principles in well-defined contexts, showing judgement in the selection and application of tools and techniques;
  • an understanding of logical arguments, identifying the assumptions made and the conclusions drawn;
  • a familiarity with the notion of mathematical modelling and the attainment of a suitable level of skill in comprehending problems, formulating them mathematically and obtaining solutions by appropriate methods;
  • an ability to communicate straightforward arguments and conclusions accurately and clearly;
  • competent use of appropriate computer technology, and;
  • the ability to manage their own learning and make use of appropriate resources.

The programme aims to consolidate and further develop, in students, a range of graduate skills and attributes that are transferable to other areas of study and professional employment. Transferable skills which graduates can expect to consolidate and further develop include knowing how to access and apply relevant research findings; communicating effectively with a range of audiences; engaging in professional dialogue with peers and senior colleagues; undertaking critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues; exercising autonomy and initiative; and working with others and taking a leading role. These are aligned with the UWS Graduate Attributes, which states that UWS graduates should be:

  • universal - globally relevant with comprehensively applicable abilities, skills and behaviours;
  • work ready - dynamic and prepared for employment in complex, ever-changing environments which require lifelong learning and resilience, and;
  • successful - as a UWS graduate with a solid foundation on which to continue succeeding and realising (my) potential, across various contexts.

The programme will encourage the student to engage in lifelong learning, study, and enquiry and to appreciate the value of mathematics and statistics to society. It will also assist the student to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and teamworking.

Following graduation from the BSc (Hons) Mathematics programme, graduates will leave UWS with the options to work in the finance, research, cyber security, and engineering industries, and much more.

Opportunities for further study

Honours graduates may choose to pursue further study of Mathematics and/or Statistics through Masters or Doctoral programmes at this or other universities. Further, graduates may choose to study for a Professional Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) Secondary, at this or other universities.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Formal lectures will be supported by a range of blended learning activities such as small group tutorials, workshops, computer laboratory classes and use of the Moodle and Aula Virtual Learning Environments (VLE).

These activities will employ a range of learning and teaching methodologies including group work, investigations, problem-based learning, student presentations and online tutor/student-led discussions. Resources such as industry-standard mathematical and statistical software packages (e.g. Maxima, Octave, SPSS and R), and interactive whiteboards, will be used, as appropriate, to develop student learning.

Students will share some modules with UWS students from a range of programmes, including, but not limited to, Mathematics with Education, Chemistry, Forensic Science, and the suite of Physics programmes.

Within the Moodle and Aula VLEs, students will experience a range of e-learning methods. They will be required to remotely access set and extension readings and other course materials, and communicate both online and asynchronously with peers, whilst being supported by tutors, to address learning tasks. Students are required to undertake and benefit from significant independent learning in each module. Student e-handbooks and other material made available to students will give more detailed information on the particular (combination of) learning and teaching methodologies that will be used for timetabled student sessions. This will clarify for students both their expectations for scheduled sessions, and their expectations for the overall balance of learning and teaching methodologies to be used during the programme.

Ongoing formative assessment across the programme will provide feedback to students on their developing thinking on subject knowledge and skills, and professional abilities. Summative assessment of academic study will take the form of class tests, written and numerical assignments, oral presentations, problem sheets, examinations, and a dissertation.

Support and Guidance

Student support and guidance is incredibly important. In addition to support provided by Programme Leaders, there are two key roles within the School’s student support network: Personal Tutors and Year Leaders. They provide guidance and advice on a range of key matters such as (but not exclusively), health and wellbeing; funding; exams and assessment; study skills; attendance and engagement; and careers. Students may also be referred for specialist advice, to the central student support teams based on each campus at the Student Hub/Link.

 


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

Graduate attributes are the skills and personal qualities to be developed in students through their university experience that will prepare for life and work in the 21st century.

Apart from the subject knowledge and expertise developed on this programme, there are many skills, abilities and qualities that will help students beyond their university studies. These will be developed in students during their studies and will help prepare them for employment and contributing to society.

The University of the West of Scotland strives to produce graduates who are UWS: that is, Universal, Work-ready (if not world-ready), and Successful. Further, the University seeks to instil, in students, personal attributes of Academic, Personal, and Professional. Particular permutations of these attributes can be seen in the University’s documentation on “I am UWS” (https://www.uws.ac.uk/current-students/your-graduate-attributes/ ). Each module descriptor listed below considers these graduate attributes and relates them to the specific mathematical topics being discussed.

Some specific examples where the programme is designed to develop students’ range of skills and attributes that are transferable to other areas of study and professional employment are

  • knowing how to access and apply relevant research findings;
  • practising in a range of professional contexts, which include a degree of unpredictability;
  • communicating effectively, both orally and in writing, with a range of audiences;
  • engaging in professional dialogue with peers and senior colleagues;
  • constructing and sustaining reasoned and coherent arguments about professional practices;
  • undertaking critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues;
  • reflecting on, and acting to improve, the effectiveness of their own practice;
  • exercising autonomy and initiative in professional activities, and;
  • working with others and, at times, taking a leading role.

Personal Development Planning (PDP) is central to the programme, which aims to develop in every student the professional qualities and capabilities of a reflective practitioner.

At Level 7, PDP/transferable skills development is an important part of the core module, Dealing with Data and the specified option module IT Skills and Mathematical Software. The aim is to enable students to become familiar with the ePortfolio that will be used, and to identify and evaluate their own range of skills and aspirations.  Students will be encouraged to take ownership and capture evidence that will demonstrate distance travelled and career-readiness.

From Levels 7 to 9, activities used for PDP/transferable skills development will be drawn from core/option module provision, to ensure that there is a strong link between PDP and the curriculum. In all aspects of PDP, the emphasis will be on students taking personal responsibility for their PDP portfolio, with support from staff as appropriate at each level.

The timetabled PDP sessions will be associated with the following modules for the BSc (Hons) Mathematics programme:

Level 7           Trimester 1: Dealing with Data
                       Trimester 2: IT Skills and Mathematical Software

Level 8           Trimester 1: Multivariable Calculus
                       Trimester 2: Differential Equations

Level 9           Trimester 1: Optional module selected
                       Trimester 2: Optional module selected

Level 10        Trimesters 1 and 2: Mathematics Project

Note that at Level 10, the PDP process is formally embedded within the Mathematics Project module. In this module, students will undertake a piece of original research or study a branch or area of mathematics or statistics unfamiliar to them. A dissertation will be written, and students will present their findings to staff and peers. Further, students will be asked to consider target setting and evaluation of their own work and will also be encouraged to reflect on personal and professional learning in academic work. The PDP process will culminate in the production of an Initial Professional Development Action Plan.

 

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

The programme delivery team will provide students with opportunities to apply their mathematical and statistical knowledge and training in work-based contexts. These will be made available through a number of vehicles, including but not limited to:

  • presentations from mathematics and statistics graduates currently working in a range of sectors;
  • application of mathematical and statistical theory to real-life data;
  • working with industry/business partners to seek solutions to contemporary work-related issues (specifically for Final Honours Projects);
  • supporting applications for summer work-related research placements within the University, and;
  • supporting the acquisition of summer placements with relevant employers.

Engagement

In line with the Academic Engagement Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on the relevant learning platform, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

Where a programme has Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body requirements these will be listed here:

Meeting a minimum threshold of engagement on 75% of pre-determined engagement points, including submission of all summative assessments.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy

The programme is appropriate for all students irrespective of age, disability, gender and gender identity, race, ethnicity, religion or belief, or sexual orientation. To promote inclusive practice, procedures and processes have been subject to Equality Impact Assessment where appropriate.

In line with the Equality Act 2010 and UWS Equality and Diversity Commitments, the School of Computing, Engineering & Physical Sciences encourages the disclosure of support requirements, including disability, at the recruitment stage and throughout the duration of the programme. Emphasis is placed on confidentiality of information, the benefits of disclosure, and that no detriment to progress will be experienced. The School will endeavour to make reasonable adjustments to teaching and learning approaches and arrangements for assessment, including in laboratory environments, where a student has disclosed specific requirements.


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of fundamentals of algebra, calculus, and statistics
A2Relate knowledge to mathematical and statistical theories, concepts and principles

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Apply basic knowledge and skills in solving routine problems in mathematics and statistics
B2Apply basic knowledge and skills in solving investigation-type problems in mathematics and statistics

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use software to tackle a range of numerical and non-numerical problems in theoretical and applicable situations
C2Present information in a variety of forms relevant to the context
C3Obtain information and data from standard sources

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Present and evaluate information and ideas in mathematical and statistical problems
D2Use a range of approaches to the solution of routine problems

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise some initiative in and take responsibility for defined activities
E2Work with others in defined group exercises

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7APPD07001ASPIRE20check markcheck mark 
7MATH07001Dealing with Data20check mark  
7MATH07008IT Skills and Mathematical Software20 check mark 
7MATH07003Mathematics of Space & Change20check mark  
7MATH07009Mathematics of Space & Change 220 check mark 
7MATH07002Sequences & Patterns20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression to SCQF Level 8 is available to students who fulfil the University progression requirements and who have obtained at least a C pass in each of the core MATH modules at SCQF 7.

In line with University Regulation 3.15, students may exit with an award of Cert HE in Mathematics, with a minimum of 120 credit points at Level 7 or above, where all Core Level 7 modules have been passed at grade C or above.
A student may exit with a Cert HE Physical Sciences, with:
• a minimum of 120 credit points achieved at Level 7 or above, and;
• at least 80 credit points are achieved from any CHEM/FORS/MATH/PHYS modules.


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge of main areas of mathematics and/or statistics
A2Display an understanding of some major core theories and principles of mathematics and/or statistics
A3Demonstrate specialist knowledge and understanding of some important mathematical and/or statistical concepts that underpin issues in classical and contemporary problems

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use a range of routine skills, techniques and practices in mathematics and/or statistics, including some advanced aspects
B2Carry out routine investigations into practical and theoretical issues
B3Present information gained through non-routine investigations which demonstrates knowledge and understanding of some classical and contemporary mathematical and/or statistical problems

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use a range of specialist statistical software packages to process and analyse data and perform statistical predictions based on analysis
C2Use mathematical software to extend the analysis of non-routine problems to those requiring numerical methods
C3Present information in numerical, graphical, verbal and written forms to a variety of audiences

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information related to the main ideas and concepts within the understanding and practice of mathematics and/or statistics
D2Use a variety of approaches to develop solutions to defined problems in classical and contemporary problems in mathematics and/or statistics
D3Display a critical evaluation of solutions and explanations of output from a range of analytical and numerical techniques

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in defined academic and professional activities
E2Take responsibility for work planning and time management within specified contexts
E3Co-operate in group working exercises

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8MATH08002Differential Equations20 check mark 
8MATH08007Linear Algebra20check mark  
8MATH08008Multivariable Calculus20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
Any other L7/L8/L9 Module   
8MATH08006Discrete Mathematics20 check mark 
8MATH08009Numerical Analysis20 check mark 
8MATH08010Probability and Statistics20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
The programme descriptor states that candidates may choose either three MATH-coded optional modules, or two MATH-coded optional modules and one optional module from outside their discipline in Year 2. This optional module can be chosen from any discipline (at Level 7 or 8); assuming that timetabling arrangements are suitable and any pre-requisites have been met.

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression to SCQF Level 9 is available to students who fulfil the University progression requirements and who have obtained at least a C pass in each of the core modules at SCQF 8.
In line with University Regulation 3.15, students may exit with an award of Dip HE in Mathematics, with a minimum of 240 credit points, where at least 100 credit points are achieved at Level 8 or above, and where all Core Level 7 and 8 modules have been passed at grade C or above. Distinction will be awarded in line with Regulations 3.25-3.26.
A student may exit with a Dip HE Physical Sciences, with:
• a minimum of 240 credit points, where;
• at least 100 credit points are achieved at Level 8 or above, and;
• at least 80 credit points are achieved from any CHEM/FORS/MATH/PHYS modules at Level 7 and Level 8.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad and integrated knowledge and understanding of major aspects of mathematics and/or statistics
A2Display a critical understanding of principal theories, principles, concepts and terminologies of mathematics and/or statistics
A3Show a knowledge of specialisms in calculus, plus at least four other chosen specialist areas in pure and applied mathematics and statistics

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Use a selection of skills, techniques and practices in the analysis of problems in mathematics and/or statistics
B2Display skills in techniques, practices and information at a specialised level in mathematics and/or statistics
B3Practise routine and more unpredictable investigations and enquiries in mathematics and/or statistics

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use suitable mathematical and/or statistical software to analyse data at a specialised level and make, and communicate, effective conclusions and recommendations
C2Communicate effectively, using a variety of media including digital technologies, and engage in professional dialogue with peers and university staff
C3Communicate and report effectively, both orally and in writing

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues in mathematics and/or statistics
D2Identify and analyse routine professional problems and issues in mathematics and/or statistics
D3Draw on a range of sources in making judgments on matters relating to mathematics and/or statistics

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in dealing with activities at a professional level in mathematics and/or statistics
E2Take some responsibility for the work of others and for the use of resources
E3Practise working in group exercises taking account of others’ roles and responsibilities

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9MATH09002Advanced Calculus20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9MATH09013Abstract Algebra20 check mark 
Any other L8/L9/L10 module.   
9MATH09009Complex Analysis20check mark  
9MATH09010Mechanics20 check mark 
9MATH09011Numerical Solution of ODEs20 check mark 
9MATH09012Statistical Estimation and Inference20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
The programme descriptor states that candidates may choose either five MATH-coded optional modules, or four MATH-coded optional modules and one optional module from outside their discipline (at Level 8, 9 or 10) in Year 3. This optional module can be chosen from any discipline; assuming that timetabling arrangements are suitable, and any pre-requisites have been met.

Criteria for Progression and Award

Progression to SCQF Level 10 is available to students who fulfil the University progression requirements and who have obtained at least a C pass in each of the core modules at SCQF 9.

In line with University Regulation 3.15, students may exit with a BSc Mathematics, with a minimum of 360 credit points, where at least 100 credit points are achieved at Level 9 or above, and where all Core Level 7, 8 and 9 modules have been passed at grade C or above (Regulation 3.15). Distinction will be awarded in line with Regulations 3.25-3.26.
A student may exit with a BSc Physical Sciences, with:
• a minimum of 360 credit points, where;
• at least 100 credit points are achieved at Level 9 or above, and;
• at least 80 credit points are achieved from CHEM/FORS/MATH/PHYS modules at every level.


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate integrated knowledge and critical understanding of a broad range of facts, concepts, principles and theories relating to main branches of mathematics and/or statistics
A2Show knowledge of specialist topics in major areas of mathematics and/or statistics, with awareness of significant issues at the frontiers of the application of statistics in today’s society
A3Demonstrate understanding of classical mathematics topics in the field of partial differential equations and their applications in today’s world
A4Demonstrate knowledge of how to access and apply relevant findings from mathematics and/or statistics

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Exhibit practical skills in classical and contemporary applications of mathematics and/or statistics, particularly in real-life situations
B2Construct and implement experimental design, and statistically analyse corresponding complex data associated with modern issues, providing recommendations based on findings
B3Execute a defined project of research, development or investigation

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Communicate effectively and engage in professional dialogue with peers, university staff and school colleagues
C2Implement specialist statistical software for the analysis of complex data associated with problems in today’s society
C3Communicate and report effectively, both orally and in writing, to a wide range of audiences, including learners, and the wider community

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues in mathematics and/or statistics
D2Justify a personal stance on issues in mathematics and/or statistics by referring to appropriate evidence from a range of sources
D3Develop record of personal professional learning and development into an Initial Professional Development Action Plan

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Exercise autonomy and initiative in academic and professional activities, including managing time and prioritising workloads
E2Work effectively with others and, at times, take a leading role in bringing about change, development and new thinking relating to an aspect of mathematics and/or statistics
E3Work, under guidance, in a peer relationship with specialist practitioners

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10MATH10011Mathematics Project40check markcheck mark 
10MATH10003Partial Differential Equations20check mark  

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
Any other L8/L9/L10 Module   
10MATH10009Coding & Cryptography20check mark  
10MATH10010Mathematical Biology20 check mark 
10MATH10008Regression Methods and Experimental Design20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
The programme descriptor states that candidates may choose either three MATH-coded optional modules, or two MATH-coded optional modules and one optional module from outside their discipline in Year 4. This optional module can be chosen from any discipline (at Level 8, 9 or 10); assuming that timetabling arrangements are suitable, and any pre-requisites have been met.

Criteria for Award

Honours degrees are classified in accordance with University Regulation 3.21.

In line with University Regulation 3.15, students who complete a minimum of 480 credit points, with at least 100 credit points from Level 10, and where all Core modules have been passed at grade C or above, will exit with BSc (Hons) Mathematics.
A student may exit with a BSc (Hons) Physical Sciences, with:
• a minimum of 480 credit points, where;
• at least 100 credit points are achieved at Level 10 or above, and;
• at least 80 credit points are achieved from CHEM/FORS/MATH/PHYS modules at every level.

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE, DipHE or BSc in Combined Studies.


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework.

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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