University of the West of Scotland

Undergraduate Programme Specification

Session: 2021/22

Last modified: 21/04/2021 13:46:31

Named Award Title:MEng (Hons) Aircraft Engineering Single

Award Title for Each Award: MEng  (Hons) Aircraft Engineering
BEng (Hons)  Aircraft Engineering
BEng  Aircraft Engineering
BSc  Aircraft Engineering
Dip HE  Engineering
Cert HE  Engineering Science

Awarding Institution/Body: University of the West of Scotland
Language of Instruction & Examination: English
Award Accredited By:Seeking accreditation from Institution of Mechanical Engineers
Maximum Period of Registration:6 Years Full Time
Mode of Study:Full Time
Part Time
Campus:Paisley

School:School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
Programme Leader:Tony Leslie

Admission Criteria

Candidates must be able to satisfy the general admission requirements of the University of the West of Scotland as specified in Chapter 2 of the University Regulatory Framework together with the following programme requirements:

SQA National Qualifications

Grades A, B, B, B @ Higher including Mathematics and Physics



or GCE

Grades B, B, B @ A level, including Mathematics and Physics.


or SQA National Qualifications/Edexcel Foundation

An appropriate HNC/HND award with the level of entry and/or credit awarded being subject to the content of the HN programme.


Other Required Qualifications/Experience

Applicants may also be considered with other academic, vocational or professional qualifications deemed to be equivalent. We welcome applications from international students with equivalency of qualifications. Scholarships may be available on application.


Further desirable skills pre-application

NA


General Overview

Aims and Objectives

  1. Develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills to prepare the student for graduate employment;
  2. Enable the student to engage in lifelong learning, study and enquiry, and to appreciate the value of education to society;
  3. Assist the student to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working;
  4. Develop a critical understanding of fundamental natural laws and their relevance to general aircraft engineering, design and associated specialisations;
  5. Develop the ability to apply this understanding (iv), in conjunction with observed information, to the solution of aircraft engineering and design problems
  6. Develop the ability to undertake typical computer aided design, appreciating the variety of design solutions possible
  7. Develop knowledge and appreciation of the science, engineering and properties of materials used in engineering and design;
  8. Develop the ability for group project work and individual project work;
  9. Develop the ability to communicate clearly and concisely by means of all the currently recognised communication media;
  10. Develop the ability to communicate clearly and concisely by means of all the currently recognised communication media;
  11. Create awareness of the continuing development of engineering technology and an appreciation of the need for continued study, ethical behaviour, personal and professional development throughout a career leading to Chartered Engineer status.
  12. Promote an understanding of the position and responsibilities of engineers in society.

Graduates from this programme are equipped to enter careers in a variety of aircraft engineering sectors or to progress to further study. Graduates from this programme should find employment in the local, national and international aerospace industry. The teaching and learning methods employed by staff in the delivery of the module portfolio covers a wide range of established and some novel approaches. Traditional lectures and tutorials still forming the basis for much of the teaching within engineering but ‘flipped’ classroom and online content, video recording of sessions is now found in a number of modules. Extensive use is also made of laboratories, seminars, group work, independent learning and demonstrations. More use is now being made of problem-based learning materials in the teaching environment. One of the main objectives in this area is to keep teaching materials as interesting and as relevant possible to ensure student enthusiasm for the subjects being presented. Staff make full use of all technologies when delivering material to students including high quality notes, use of multimedia presentations and use of the internet/electronic technology.

The Engineering, Design and Manufacture group has a policy of using small tutorial groups in key subject areas and either sub-divides cohorts into small groups or increase staff numbers in classes or laboratories. All modules are taught by subject experts with staff making use of materials and topics raised through their professional activities whether prior industrial experience, research or consultancy based. Many case studies and examples of applications are taken from live industrial situations. The School of Computing, Engineerign and Physical Sciences has always taken a lead in the use of IT to either deliver material or to supplement and reinforce the traditional teaching and learning approaches. At the Paisley Campus Engineering has its own extensive networks to support all of the area’s activity. Students have access to 100+ high specification PC workstations in state of the art air- conditioned laboratories dedicated specifically for Engineering students. Indeed, all modules are now supported electronically, providing notes, copies of lectures, models, sample simulations etc. The standard system for providing a VLE (Virtual Learning Environment) within the University is Moodle, which is used by all staff. This system is used mainly for dissemination of materials and information regarding module administration but is also used for online formative and summative assessment, assessment submissions and discussion forums. A variety of assessment methods are used throughout programmes. These range from class tests, laboratory reports, design assignments, individual and group presentations and formal examinations. Both group project work and individual project work are incorporated into the curriculum so that students develop the learning skills associated with group and independent working as well as giving presentations on their work. Formative feedback and constructive comments are given to the student on their coursework submissions. Anonymous marking is undertaken, where possible. Mixtures of formative and summative methods are used in the assessment of student performance within the group. It is recognised that while most of the assessments are summative in nature but an increase in the use of formative assessment, which delivers regular feedback is now commonly adopted. The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in alignment with the Engineering benchmark statements and the Engineering Council’s UK Spec.


Graduate Attributes, Employability & Personal Development Planning

Graduate Attributes

UWS’ Graduate Attributes focus on academic, personal and professional skills and throughout the programmes that these skills develop graduates who are universally prepared, work-ready and successful. The Aircraft Engineering programme provides opportunities throughout the levels to enable these skills to be developed and focussed appropriately.

Aircraft Engineering knowledge is assembled throughout the programme and wherever possible digital literacy skills and ability to provide effective solutions is enhanced utilising industry standard appropriate technologies such as MATLAB, MATHCAD, CAD, FEA and CFD software.

Particularly, but not exclusively, in later years of the programme, critical analytical and inquiry skills are developed and used to solve industry related problems. Many of these are set in and constrained by consideration of aerospace regulatory body design specifications such as CS25. 

Aerodynamic and structures design and analysis exercises are utilised where incisive and innovative solutions are required to be effectively presented as part of collaborative groups or as individual autonomous learning activities. 

The programme promotes cultural awareness and emotional intelligence with a variety of group exercises developing resilient, ambitious and enterprising leadership qualities whilst ensuring that group members are emotionally and culturally aware and respectful communication and behaviours are the norm. 

Commercial awareness is linked to aircraft design activities during the programme ensuring that costs associated with staff, materials, manufacture, in-service and decommissioning are considered when developing transformational/innovative solutions with commercial potential. 

 Ethical awareness and social responsibility is developed throughout and is formalised in 4th and 5th years during project studies where School/University ethical approval is sought if required.

Links to current University and programme research are promoted through the programme with opportunities for students to become involved in aspects of the research from the earliest opportunity either discretely or as part of an assessment.

Employability

The local aerospace market contains a number of international companies such as BAE Systems, Spirit AeroSystems United Technologies, British Airways, Woodward etc and the programme has been developed with feedback from those local companies. Such is the diversity of the work these companies undertake the skills the graduates gain from undertaking the programme are internationally transferrable.

The majority of the final year projects are offered in collaboration with these partner industries and this in tandem with short term placements at the end of third year with many of the local companies is providing graduate employment opportunities at the end of the students' studies.

The programme is also organised to allow part time entry allowing those in employment to undertake degree award on a day release manner and thereby supporting employers to increase qualification levels of their employees manageably.

Personal Development Planning

Across the programme of study, the Personal Development Planning (PDP) process gives the opportunity for engagement of students with a set of core activities, which include reflection on prior experience, personal attributes and goals; audits of skills and feedback on their development; opportunities and guidance on the recording of achievements; the identification/development of learning goals;

opportunities to reflect on this material and to gain feedback; opportunities (and guidance) on presentation of evidence for different audiences and planning of future learning and career development (such as CVs); maintaining an effective PDP record.

Work Based Learning/Placement Details

A number of local employers are offering short term unpaid placements at the end of year 3 and this is leading to further opportunities for paid internships at the end of year 4.

This programme offers a 20 credit, level 9, Workplace Learning optional module which must be agreed and documented according to the module descriptor before the module can be undertaken.

Engagement and Attendance

In line with the Academic Engagement and Attendance Procedure, Students are defined as academically engaged if they are regularly engaged with timetabled teaching sessions, course-related learning resources including those in the Library and on Moodle, and complete assessments and submit these on time.

For the purposes of this programme, this equates to the following:

Students are expected to attend all timetabled sessions and to engage with all formative and summative assessment elements of all the modules that are included in the programme specification as core modules as well as any optional module when applicable.

Equality and Diversity


The University's Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Procedure can be accessed at the following link: UWS Equality and Diversity Policy


Programme structures and requirements, SCQF level, term, module name and code, credits and awards ( Chapter 1, Regulatory Framework )

A. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of the key areas of aircraft engineering, and its underpinning science and mathematics.
A2Demonstrate a basic knowledge and understanding of introductory principles and contexts with respect to multi-disciplinary aspects of aircraft engineering.
A3Knowledge and understanding of the relevant materials, equipment and processes and technologies underpinning aircraft design.
A4Demonstrate an understanding of the commercial context and sustainability of aircraft engineering activities.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Be able to apply appropriate quantitative science and engineering tools to the analysis of aircraft and other engineering problems.
B2Apply acquired knowledge and understanding and practical engineering skills in appropriate laboratories, workshops and individual and group projects.
B3Use and apply technical literature and other information sources.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Develop an appropriate range of transferable skills in communication, the use of IT facilities and information retrieval.
C2Use computer software relevant to aircraft engineering.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Apply appropriate quantitative science and engineering tools to basic problems.
D2Develop an appropriate range of transferable skills and apply these in problem solving.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Develop an initial appreciation of the social, environmental, ethical, economic and commercial considerations affecting the exercise of engineering judgment.
E2Develop transferable skills that will be of value in working with others.
E3Develop skills in planning self-learning and improving performance, as the foundation for PDP, lifelong learning and CPD.
E4Demonstrate an understanding of the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
7ENGG07002Applied Engineering Science20   
7ENGG07004Technical Communications20   
7ENGG07011Aircraft Aerodynamics, Structures and Systems20check mark  
7MATH07006Engineering Mathematics 110   
7ENGG07001Engineering Mechanics20 check mark 
7ENGG07018Aircraft Simulation and Programming10 check mark 
7ENGG07019Aircraft Flight Studies10 check mark 
7MATH07007Engineering Mathematics 210 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress from SCQF Level 7 to SCQF Level 8 in this programme, students are normally required to obtain 120 credits from the above programme and achieve an average of all modules of >=60%.

All pre-requisite modules must be passed before progression is allowed.

Refer to Regulation 3.13 regarding progression with credit deficit, note, the decision to permit a proceed with carry is not automatic but is subject to detailed discussion at the programme award board.

Students obtaining 120 credits at SCQF Level 7 or above, with 100 from the programme are eligible for the exit award of the Certificate of Higher Education in Engineering Science.


B. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a deeper knowledge of the engineering concepts of statics and dynamics
A2Demonstrate an extended knowledge of the different types and characteristics of engineering materials
A3Demonstrate a knowledge of primary and secondary manufacturing processes
A4Demonstrate an extended knowledge of mathematical principles appropriate to aircraft engineering.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Select appropriate materials and manufacturing methods for a range of aircraft and broader engineering components.
B2Determine the appropriate method of manufacture for aircraft and broader engineering components.
B3Design a suitable jig, fixture or component for an aircraft engineering component.
B4Undertake appropriate design calculations for different aspects of engineering artefacts
B5Demonstrate skills in the application and use of computer aided design software

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Communicate design ideas through the use of 3D modelling software
C2Demonstrate the ability to communicate engineering ideas and concepts through the use of presentation software
C3Demonstrate the ability to analyse engineering data through the use of application software
C4Demonstrate the use of web technology to communicate product information to a selected audience
C5Demonstrate an understanding of the computer techniques available to enhance the communication of engineering ideas and concepts

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Use appropriate quantitative science and engineering tools to the analysis of basic engineering problems.
D2Demonstrate the ability to monitor, interpret and apply the results of analysis and modelling.
D3Demonstrate the ability to apply basic quantitative methods relevant to aircraft engineering design problems.
D4Demonstrate the ability to define a problem and identify constraints.
D5Demonstrate the ability to use appropriate codes of practice and industry standards.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Develop an enhanced level of transferable skills that will be of value in working with others in more complex situations
E2Recognise the role and contribution of team members when carrying out and evaluating tasks
E3Understand the need for the consideration of Sustainability at the initial stage of product design

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
8ENGG08002Computer Aided Design CAD20   
8ENGG08028Principles of Aerodynamics20check mark  
8MATH08001Mathematics For Design20check mark  
8ENGG08001Materials & Manufacture20 check mark 
8ENGG08017Design Analysis 120 check mark 
8ENGG08029Thermofluids for Aircraft Engineers20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress from SCQF Level 8 to SCQF Level 9 in this programme, students are required to obtain 240 credits from the above programme and achieve an average of all modules in the year of >=60%.

All pre-requisite modules must be passed before progression is allowed.

Refer to Regulation 3.13 regarding progression with credit deficit, note, the decision to permit a proceed with carry is not automatic but is subject to detailed discussion at the programme award board.

Students obtaining 240 credits of which 100 are at SCQF Level 8 or above from the programme are eligible for the exit award of the Diploma of Higher Education in Engineering.


C. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Knowledge and understanding of scientific principles and methodologies necessary to underpin relevant technologies, methods and developments in aircraft engineering applications;
A2Knowledge and understanding of mathematical principles and techniques necessary to underpin their education in aircraft engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notation in the analysis and solution of aircraft engineering problems;
A3Knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of engineering materials and components and the ability to apply them to the analysis of key engineering components;
A4Knowledge and understanding of the principles of IT and specialist software relevant to engineering and design, particularly CAE and the ability to use such software to the analysis and design of components and systems;
A5Understanding of manufacturing and operational practice relevant to engineering and design and the ability to apply them to analyse key engineering processes.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Select and apply appropriate mathematical and computer based methods for modelling and analysing engineering and general design problems;
B2Apply scientific principles in the development of engineering solutions to practical problems;
B3Apply scientific principles in the modelling and analysis of systems, processes and products requiring engineering solutions;
B4Ability to monitor, interpret and apply the results of analysis to develop, maintain processes or products in order to bring about continuous improvement;
B5Produce solutions to problems through the application of mechanical/aircraft engineering;

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Apply appropriate mathematical and analytical techniques in the solution of engineering and design problems;
C2Demonstrate the ability to use relevant test, modelling, and measurement equipment in the laboratory;
C3Demonstrate the ability to use appropriate engineering and design IT tools to solve engineering problems;
C4Ability to apply a systems approach to engineering problems through know-how of the application of relevant technologies;
C5Apply project management techniques and tools to an engineering problem;

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Demonstrate problem solving skills appropriate to a mechanical, aircraft or design engineer;
D2Assess the requirements of International Standards and their impact on system design
D3Develop the ability to work independently or as part of a team;
D4Develop the ability for effective use of information technology;
D5Develop effective technical based communication skills;

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Knowledge and understanding of project planning and time and resource management techniques.
E2Recognise the need for professional and ethical conduct in engineering and awareness of environmental issues
E3Investigate and apply relevant International Standards to a particular design study.
E4Understanding of the requirement of Risk Assessments, and demonstrate the ability to compile a risk assessment
E5Understand the need for career development and lifelong learning.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9ENGG09004Project Management20check mark  
9ENGG09020Design Analysis 220check mark  
9ENGG09027Aircraft Design and Performance20check mark  
9ENGG09028Aircraft Design, Modelling & Analysis20 check mark 
9ENGG09011Analysis & Simulation 120 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
9ENGG09018Independent Study20check markcheck markcheck mark1
9ENGG09019Applied Intelligent Systems20 check mark 1

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes
1. Applied Intelligent Systems ENGG09019 & Independent Study ENGG09018 optional for Part-Time students only. Applied Intelligent Systems remains core for Full-Time students.

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress from SCQF Level 9 to SCQF Level 10 in this programme, students are required to obtain 360 credits of which 100 credits are at SCQF Level 9 from the above programme to achieve an average of all modules of >=60% in 2 of the first 3 years of study inclusive of SCQF Level 9.

All pre-requisite modules must be passed before progression is allowed and no student will be allowed to progress to Level 10 with credit deficit.

Students obtaining 360 credits of which 100 are at SCQF Level 9 or above from the programme are eligible for the exit award of the BEng in Aircraft Engineering.
The award of distinction can be made to a student obtaining a pass degree as stated in the University Regulations.

Any student who has completed 360 credit points, 300 being in Engineering, and not as laid out above, may be entitled to exit with BSc Aircraft Engineering, at the discretion of the PAB.


D. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1Demonstrate a detailed and innovative knowledge and understanding in the integration of a range of engineering techniques through project activity
A2Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of design principles and apply them to the development of an engineering design
A3Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of advanced aircraft engineering principles.
A4Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of aerodynamics as applied to aircraft design,
A5Demonstrate a clear understanding of the scope, application and limitations of Finite Element Analysis and Computational Fluid Dynamics.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Integrate a number of engineering principles through a major individual project and group project.
B2Undertake a design, evaluate, manufacture and test team based project
B3Apply computer based simulation to optimise component or process designs
B4Investigate experimentation techniques for validation of aircraft systems
B5Undertake static and dynamic assessments of a range of aircraft engineering components or equipment

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Use computer simulation to communicate design solutions
C2Analyse and evaluate engineering data as a means of optimising a component or system
C3Use computer software to present project results to a variety of audiences including peers, academics and industrialists
C4Ability to apply a systems approach to engineering problems through know-how of the application of relevant technologies;
C5Apply project management techniques and tools to an engineering problem;

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Demonstrate creative skills in preparing engineering design solutions
D2Demonstrate the ability to investigate and solve engineering problems through the use of computer simulation
D3Assess the requirements of international standards and how they impact on aircraft and component design
D4Carry out individual and group projects in a professional, responsible and ethical manner
D5Develop effective technical based communication skills;

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Practice project planning, time and resource management techniques
E2Working with peers demonstrate a high level of ability to function effectively as a team member,demonstrating leadership when required
E3Undertake and complete an individual aircraft engineering project
E4Investigate and apply relevant international standards and requirements to a particular design study.
E5Analyse the risk involved in the design and operation of a component, system or process.

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10ENGG10019Analysis & Simulation 220check mark  
10ENGG10021Composite Structures20check mark  
10ENGG10001Final Year Project40check markcheck mark 
10ENGG10027Advanced Aerodynamics20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
10ENGG10038Model Aircraft Design Group Project20check markcheck mark 
10ENGG10020Design Analysis 320 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Progression and Award

To progress from SCQF Level 10 to SCQF Level 11 in this programme, students are normally required to obtain 480 credits from the above programme and achieve an average of all modules of >=60% at SCQF Level 10.
Students obtaining 480 credits of which 240 are at SCQF Level 9 and SCQF Level 10 from the above programme including all core module but do not satisfy the requirements for progression to Level 11 are eligible for the BEng (Hons) Aircraft Engineering Award.
The Classification of BEng (Hons) Aircraft Engineering will be determined by University Regulation 3.20-3.24.


E. Learning Outcomes (Maximum of 5 per heading)

Outcomes should incorporate those applicable in the relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Knowledge and Understanding

A1An overall professional knowledge and integration of the main areas of the Aircraft Engineering profession in relation to its disciplines and specialisms into the overall design and development of associated projects.
A2A Critical understanding and embedment of the main theories, concepts and principles within Aircraft Engineering towards the practice of the profession.
A3Comprehension, appreciation and critical understanding of a range of specialised theories applied to the dynamic nature of Aircraft Engineering Knowledge towards understanding each individual project undertaken.
A4Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of aerodynamics and structural analysis and their interaction as applied to aircraft design,
A5Extensive, detailed and critical knowledge and understanding of aircraft structural analysis of advanced materials and complex loading.

Practice - Applied Knowledge and Understanding

B1Gain expertise in using a significant range of the principal professional skills, techniques, practices and/or materials associated with the Aircraft Engineering Profession.
B2Demonstrate originality and creativity, related to Aircraft Engineering practice and application within a wide and often changeable environments.
B3Develop expertise in a range of specialised Aircraft Engineering contemporary skills, techniques and practices.
B4Planning and executing a significant group project of Aircraft Engineering investigation or development.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

C1Communicate, using appropriate methods, to a range of audiences with different levels of knowledge/expertise.
C2Communicate, using appropriate Aircraft Engineering methods, to a range of audiences with different levels of knowledge/expertise
C3Use a wide range of ICT applications to support and enhance work at this level and adjust features to suit the purpose of the associated task.
C4Undertake critical evaluations of a wide range of numerical and graphical data.

Generic Cognitive Skills - Problem Solving, Analysis, Evaluation

D1Identify, conceptualise and define specific problems and issues in Aircraft Engineering Design and Development.
D2Develop original and creative responses to problems and issues within an Aircraft Engineering context.
D3The Application of critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis to current issues, or issues that are informed by current developments in Aircraft Mechanical Engineering.
D4Handle complex issues and make informed judgements in situations in the absence of complete or consistent data/information

Autonomy, Accountability and Working With Others

E1Take responsibility for own work and also take significant responsibility for the work of others within a team environment
E2Take responsibility for own work and also take significant responsibility for the work of others within a team environment demonstrating leadership when required
E3Manage complex ethical and professional issues and make informed judgements on issues not addressed by current professional and/or ethical codes or practices

Core Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
11ENGG11033Advanced Fluid Mechanics and CFD20check mark  
11ENGG11048Aircraft Structural Analysis20check mark  
11ENGG11050Group Project for MEng40check markcheck mark 
11ENGG11049Aeroelasticity20 check mark 
11ENGG11022Applied Finite Element Analysis20 check mark 

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Optional Modules
SCQF Level Module CodeModule NameCreditTermFootnotes
123
               

* Indicates that module descriptor is not published.

Footnotes

Criteria for Award

To be eligible for the award of MEng (Hons) degree a candidate must hold 600 credits, including 360 at SCQF Levels 9, 10 and 11 from the above programme.
The Classification will take into account students' performance at Level 9, Level 10 and Level 11.
The composite mark is given by:
20% from Level 9
30% from Level 10
50% from Level 11
The classification will be determined as follows:-
First Class >=70% Average
Upper Second Class (2.1) >=60% Average
Lower Second Class (2.2) >=50% Average


Regulations of Assessment

Candidates will be bound by the general assessment regulations of the University as specified in the University Regulatory Framework .

An overview of the assessment details is provided in the Student Handbook and the assessment criteria for each module is provided in the module descriptor which forms part of the module pack issued to students. For further details on assessment please refer to Chapter 3 of the Regulatory Framework.

To qualify for an award of the University, students must complete all the programme requirements and must meet the credit minima detailed in Chapter 1 of the Regulatory Framework.

Combined Studies

There may be instances where a student has been unsuccessful in meeting the award criteria for the named award and for other more generic named awards existing within the School. Provided that they have met the credit requirements in line with the SCQF credit minima (please see Regulation 1.21), they will be eligible for an exit award of CertHE / DipHE or BA / BSc in Combined Studies.

For students studying BA, BAcc, or BD awards the award will be BA Combined Studies.

For students studying BEng or BSc awards, the award will be BSc Combined Studies.



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